August 29, 2019 by

Nebraskans are known for their hospitality and generosity, exemplified by their involvement with countless charitable endeavors. This list of nonprofits–led by members and volunteers–helps young professionals find the right organization in which to serve, network, and grow professionally.


Greater Omaha Chamber Young Professionals

402.346.5000
omahachamber.org
Annual dues: None

Greater Omaha Chamber YP

Greater Omaha Chamber Young Professionals cultivate volunteering and outreach opportunities for the area’s young professionals, and aim to attract similar, like-minded individuals from other cities to Omaha. Volunteers organize the annual YP Summit, which will celebrate its 15th anniversary in March 2020, and connect individuals with nonprofits suited to their interests through the organization’s website.

Omaha Habitat Young Professionals

402.884.6858
habitatomaha.org
Annual dues: $45

Omaha Habitat YP
Members aim to promote homeownership in the metro area through volunteerism, advocacy, and fundraising. Beyond building affordable housing, the Omaha Habitat Young Professionals host DIY events and “friend”-raisers—events to boost membership—and volunteer at Habitat for Humanity ReStores. These young professionals organize the annual benefit concert Band Build and help with Brew Haha, a fundraiser featuring local breweries and restaurants, to support Habitat for Humanity and homebuilding efforts.

Urban League of Nebraska Young Professionals

402.453.9730
urbanleagueneb.org
Annual dues: $50

Urban League YP
Members of the Urban League of Nebraska Young Professionals focus on promoting, training, and developing young professionals of color and participate in community events such as North High’s Career Expo and community cleanup days. Benefits include a general membership in the Urban League of Nebraska, leadership and professional development training, and invitations to young professional and National Urban League events.

Omaha Jaycees

785.410.8871
omahajaycees.org
Annual dues: $75

Jaycees YP
Omaha Jaycees was the first young professionals organization in Omaha, as they were established in 1921. They represent the U.S. Junior Chamber. Jaycees organize the Beer and Bacon Festival and Hometown Holidays donation drive each year, and volunteer for local organizations such as the Siena/Francis House and Habitat for Humanity. Members also host an annual Young Professional Education Day to equip individuals with life skills such as filing taxes. Membership benefits include free entry to monthly social events, access to member-only quarterly outings, free or discounted tickets to Jaycees’ fundraising events (such as Beer and Bacon Festival), and professional networking opportunities.

40 Below

402.661.8454
omahaperformingarts.org
Annual dues: $99

40 Below YP

Young professionals passionate about supporting the arts can become members of 40 Below. Membership dues help support Omaha Performing Arts in attaining educational and community engagement initiatives such as Jazz on the Green. The group hosts the summertime social Twilight on the Terrace each year, drawing inspiration from next season’s performances. Membership benefits include meet and greets; backstage tours; discounted tickets at networking events, shows, and fundraisers; and invitations to special events.

United Way of the Midlands Emerging Leaders

402.342.8232
urbanleagueneb.org
Annual dues: $250

Emerging Leaders, United Way
The Emerging Leaders participate in all major United Way volunteering opportunities such as the Day of Action and Holiday Helpers. Other volunteer opportunities include the spring concert—which featured speaker Peter Buffett this year—and the annual United Way of the Midlands Golf Tournament. They also partner with Book Trust, a national literacy initiative benefitting school children from kindergarten to third grade, by providing local elementary schools with books. Members fundraise to ensure each child gets $7 a month to purchase books through the Scholastic Reading Club and read with the children once the books are delivered to classrooms.


This article was printed in the September 2019 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.