Tag Archives: RDG Planning and Design

This sponsored content appeared in the December 2018/January 2019 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/bb1218_flipbook/30


According to a 2010 study by the U.S. Department of Labor, women comprised 47 percent of the total U.S. labor force. That same study found that women comprise 91.1 percent of registered nurses, but also 66.1 percent of tax examiners, collectors, and revenue agents, and 59.3 percent of all insurance writers.

The National Association of Women Business Owners revealed in 2015 that women-owned firms account for 31 percent of all privately held firms.

The women on these sponsored pages own or represent a variety of businesses, from those that have been traditionally male-dominated, to those run by all-female teams, to those that encourage diversity in the workplace. They are advertising professionals, real estate agents, urban planners, and more.


ASHLEY PERKINS
COX COMMUNICATIONS

11505 W. DODGE ROAD OMAHA, NE 68154
402.934.3223
cox.com

GAIL DEBOER
COBALT 

7148 TOWNE CENTER PARKWAY PAPILLION, NE 68046
402.292.8000
cobaltcu.com

REVELA TEAM
REVELA

1508 LEAVENWORTH ST.
Omaha, NE 68102
712.322.1112
revelagroup.com

MEDIA BUYING TEAM
OBI CREATIVE 

4909 S. 135th ST., SUITE 200 OMA

HA, NE 68137
402.493.7999
info@obicreative.com
obicreative.com

SHAYNE FILI
AUCTION SOLUTIONS, INC.

7811 MILITARY AVE. OMAHA, NE 68134
402.571.0393
auctionsolutionsinc.com

KELSEY ELMAN GOLDSMITH
ELMAN PRINT

6210 SOUTH 118TH ST. OMAHA, NE 68137
402.346.0888
elmanprint.com

VICKI KOVAR 
BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

331 VILLAGE POINTE PLAZA OMAHA NE 68118
402.660.9300
vickikovar.com

GRETCHEN RADLER
BLOOM COMPANION CARE

9290 W. DODGE ROAD, SUITE 102 OMAHA, NE 68114
402.342.3040
bloomcompanion.com

ANGELIA THOMAS
LEYDEN, THOMAS AND ASSOCIATES

17310 WRIGHT ST., SUITE 102 OMAHA, NE 68130
402.697.7320
ameripriseadvisors.com/team/leyden-thomas-associates

BARBARA CHRISTIANSON
INGERSOLL RAND

13205 CENTENNIAL ROAD OMAHA, NE 68138
402.330.5831
ingersollrandproducts.com

ROBIN SPENCER
TLR COACHING

robin@tlrcoaching.com
tlrcoaching.com

LORI KIRKPATRICK, TAHNEE CHEDEL
HEARTS AND FIRE

11015 ELM ST. OMAHA, NE 68144
402.884.1106
@heartsfireco on Facebook

STEPHANIE CLARK
NAI NP DODGE

12915 WEST DODGE ROAD OMAHA, NE 68154
402.255.6070
nainpdodge.com

CRYSTAL CUNNINGHAM, LEA SCHUSTER,
AMY HAASE
RDG PLANNING & DESIGN 

900 FARNAM ST., SUITE 100 OMAHA, NE 68102
402.392.0133
rdgusa.com

NOREEN THELEN
LOMBARDO’S

13110 BIRCH DR. OMAHA, NE 68164
402.884.9800
lombardosomaha.com

KELLY BURNS
PAYROLL PROFESSIONALS

2829 SOUTH 88TH ST. OMAHA, NE 68124
402.618.2804
payrollprofessionalsomaha.com

JILL DAVIE
TEAM SOFTWARE

407 S. 27TH AVE. OMAHA, NE 68131
800.500.4499
teamsoftware.com

Circles of Support, Cycles of Life

November 21, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

A giant ‘3801’ sign—the one hanging off the sleek new headquarters of Omaha’s Women’s Center for Advancement at 38th and Harney streets—stands out against the gray brick backdrop of this recently renovated property. Bold, rounded numbers point to the nonprofit’s updated building, where they provide aid to victims of domestic abuse.

The roundness of the numbers’ font is one of the organization’s many ways of telling the public there is an ongoing cycle of violence, while the size screams “We’re here.” The oversized loops of text were so large, the WCA needed to convince the city council that the sign’s height is appropriate, despite city codes restricting its placement.

“They have to know where it is!” CEO Amy Richardson explains, referring to clients and WCA supporters alike. “It’s really important that we’re identifiable. We’re not hiding this problem.”

Walls of rectangular glass panels wrap around the eastern corner of the building, reflecting that sense of transparency as sunlight passes though them and into the curved lobby. “Light is very healing,” Richardson says, and cites a need for it as the incentive behind a custom window film used throughout the building. Patterns of opaque dots, rings, and circles balance brightness with a sense of privacy, providing a one-way mirror effect for meeting rooms.

That circular theme is built into the very heart of the WCA’s home, where a cylindrical beam sprouts from the center of the building and through the middle of the client lobby, Richardson’s favorite addition to the new digs. Halos of light hang from a curved ceiling above various seating options arranged with intention—it’s almost impossible to look at one another while sitting in them—another piece of privacy in the clients-only space.

Waves and arches loop into the ceiling of the first-floor, guiding visitors past wall embellishments made from reclaimed wood and a modern, neutral palette combined with pops of color. New additions include a clothing boutique, an emergency entrance with an attached medical clinic, and legal workshops. Director of Marketing and Public Relations Elizabeth Powers points out how these services empower victims.

Richardson credits the vision behind the space in large part to project manager Andrea Kathol. “She was the conductor of all of it.” Other key players included RDG designer Alysia Radicia and Lund Ross Construction.

Kathol says her favorite part of the project was getting to work closely with such a great team.

“And the day the doors opened—just to see how proud everybody was of what we accomplished,” she says. “To understand what this means to Omaha to have a beautiful, healthy place for victims to go.”

The organization also realizes they need a circle of donors and volunteers from the community to help provide a vast array of services, including a medical clinic, legal workshops, temporary housing, and more. As a sign of gratitude, names of those who contribute are added to their donor wall, a collage of circular wooden art showcasing dozens of supporters.

On the upper floors, open office doors show comfy puppy beds and bouquets of birthday balloons orbiting staff and volunteer spaces, all pieces of a positive workspace intended to lessen the strain of dealing with trauma on a regular basis. Their goal? To unmask this issue, to provide a safe space for those in need, and to break this cycle of violence. In its comfortable, inviting new space, the Women’s Center for Advancement works round the clock to make Omaha a safer place for all.


For more information, visit wcaomaha.org.

This article was printed in the December 2018/January 2019 edition of B2B. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Pingpong, Popcorn, and Pops of Colors

September 17, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Ervin & Smith’s office resembles an aquarium floating above the Aksarben Village street level. But instead of fish, there is a full-service advertising and public relations firm occupying the second floor of 1926 S. 67th St., Suite 250.

Pedestrian passersby can catch a glimpse of ad agency life through bare full-wall windows wrapping along the southeast side of the modern office building. 

Ervin & Smith’s stand-alone popcorn machine beckons from the corner of the second floor overlooking Lotus House of Yoga and the new HDR headquarters. 

The suite’s bare-glass southern wall faces Genesis Health Clubs with a row of pod workstations—partially enclosed, high-backed club chairs in teal and gray upholstery. The east wall of the office space features three house-shaped semi-private spaces with bar tables and chairs.

Heidi Mausbach, president and CEO of Ervin & Smith, says the current design is the result of a collaborative process focused on fostering an environment conducive to teamwork and community engagement.

Mausbach challenged the local architectural office of RDG Planning and Design to build an office space that encourages fun, collaboration, and community involvement. Everyone on the Ervin & Smith team participated in RDG’s research to provide insights on an ideal working environment for a diverse workforce.

“People wanted more private space, more collaborative space, more comfortable space, but many didn’t want an open environment. So we really dug into what’s the problem and heard that a lot of times in an open environment it’s just flat desks all the way across, there is very little privacy,” Mausbach says.

RDG tackled the assignment with a variety of mobile dividers, private offices, and myriad café- style booths. A mix of materials—plywood, metal, and textiles—were incorporated into the designs to serve as visual buffers. Soundproof materials ensure a quiet workplace to the agency’s staff of 42 employees.

When Mausbach was thinking about effective ways to use the new office, she decided to invite clients and representatives of other companies to use Ervin & Smith’s meeting space. For example, employees who serve on the boards of nonprofit organizations can do community impact work in the large conference room. And if more space is needed? The garage door separating the large conference room and multifunctional kitchen can be put up for more people to gather.

Ervin & Smith was named in Best Places to Work by Ad Age in 2014, 2016, and 2017. The Omaha-based advertising and PR firm also earned a Top Company Cultures award from Entrepreneur magazine in 2017, and it received a Business Excellence Award for Leadership from the Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce in 2018.

“We want to continue to have a culture that people want to work here, so we can recruit and retain the best talent. We put a lot of emphasis on making it a great place to work,” says Mausbach, adding that Ervin & Smith sought to foster career, social, financial, physical, and community well-being among its employees, based on research from Gallup.

“With Gallup, they have five different categories of well-being, so we’re looking at creating perks that align with those,” she says. “This year, we bring in lunch twice a week. Free lunch aside, it brings together coworkers for a little bit of downtime and builds social relationships outside of the work that we are doing.”

And then there is that free snack. “The popcorn machine is used every single day,” Mausbach says. So is the pingpong table in front of it.

One of the team’s associate creative directors, Aaron Christensen, enjoys both. He even keeps a recurring appointment with Don Aguirre, one of the agency’s senior copywriters. These creative staffers bounce ideas off each other during their daily pingpong contests. And they keep score.

“For me, the daily pingpong game serves as a brain break,” Christensen says. “It gets me away from my desk and gets the blood flowing a bit. I haven’t had any amazing creative breakthroughs, but just taking the time to stop thinking about things is an important way to come back and get a new perspective on a problem I’m trying to solve.”

“Playing pingpong is my daily reminder of just how great of a gig I have at Ervin & Smith,” Aguirre says. “It’s just a fun way to give myself a mid-afternoon brain-break.”

“That playful, give-your-brain-a-break type of environment, sometimes that’s where the best ideas come from,” Mausbach says.


Visit ervinandsmith.com for more information.

This article was printed in the October/November 2018 edition of B2B. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.