Tag Archives: Omaha theater

January/February 2020 Stage Performances Calendar

January 7, 2020 by

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm. 


Stage Performances

Les Misérables
Jan. 14-19 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. One of the most popular productions in theater history, this is the story of former convict Jean Valjean’s life in 19th-century France. Tickets: $40-$125. Times vary. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

Les-Miserables-Photo-Matthew-Murphy

A Raisin in the Sun
Jan. 17 through Feb. 9 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Set in South Side Chicago, this show follows the Younger family as they fight against poverty and racism. An unexpected insurance check could lead to a better life, but how should they use it? Tickets: $24+ adults, $16+ students. Times vary. 402.553.0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

Cirque Mechanics
Jan. 21 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Aerialists soar up to 42 feet in the air in this modern take on a traditional circus. Tickets: $18-$35. 7 p.m. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

Cirque-Mechanics acrobats

Is There a Doctor in the House?
Jan. 26 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. The orchestra is sick and they need the audience to help them feel better. Tickets: $15. 2 p.m. 402.345.0202.
ticketomaha.com

Women Laughing Alone with Salad
Jan. 27 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. A staged reading by award-winning playwright Sheila Callaghan about the oppressive and unrealistic cultural expectations that women face in society. This event is free and open to the public. 7 p.m. 403.553.0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

WAKEY, WAKEY
Jan. 30-Feb. 23 at Bluebarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. This show talks about time, gratitude, childhood, and the million miracles at work in the world. It includes pictures, music, and cake. 7:30 p.m. most days, Sundays vary. $35 general admission; $30 seniors, educators, military members. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Howie D: Back in the Day
Jan. 31-Feb. 16 at Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Howie Dorough explores what life was like as a middle schooler trying to fit in-long before he became a member of the Backstreet Boys. Tickets: $25 non-members, $12 members. Times vary. 402.345.4849.
rosetheater.org

Todd Barry
Feb. 1 at the Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. International comedian and actor Todd Barry visits Omaha and brings his unique brand of standup with him. Tickets: $20 advance, $25 day of show. 8 p.m. 402.345.7569.
theslowdown.com

Opera Omaha: Abduction from the Seraglio
Feb. 7 and 9 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This comedic, yet ultimately tragic, opera is the story of two men rescuing their lovers from a Pasha’s harem. Tickets: $19-$99. 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 7 and 2 p.m. on Feb. 9. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

A Bronx Tale
Feb. 11-16 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. An energetic show about a young man who finds himself caught between his love for his father and the mob in the Bronx in the 1960s. Tickets: $32-$90. Times vary. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

Young Calogero, Sonny, A Bronx Tale

Native Gardens
Feb. 14-Mar. 15 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. A minor disagreement about property lines escalates into a much bigger battle between two neighbors. Tickets: $36+ students, $18+ students. Times vary. 402.553.0800.
ticketomaha.com

The Little Engine That Could
Feb. 15-Mar. 8 at Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. The timeless tale of believing in yourself comes to the stage in a show for all ages. Tickets: $12 non-members, $10 members. Times vary. 402.345.4849.
rosetheater.org

Mystery Science Theater 3000
Feb. 18 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Creator Joel Hodgson embarks on his final tour, complete with movie riffing robots. Tickets: $30-$300. 7:30 p.m. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

Blood at the Root
Feb. 19-22 at UNO, 6001 Dodge St.
Feb. 28-29, Mar. 1 and 6-8 at The Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 N. 24th St. This performance recounts the story of the Jena Six and looks at racial double standards in America. Tickets: $16. Times vary. 402.554.7529.
unomaha.edu

The Crystal
Feb. 21-22 & Feb. 28-29 at the Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. This interactive theatrical performance explores space and time. 7 p.m. Tickets: $25, includes dinner. 402.884.0135.
apollonomaha.com

Camille A. Brown & Dancers
Feb. 21 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Broadway choreographer Camille A. Brown blends hip-hop, ballet, and tap in this performance. Tickets: $20-$38. 7:30 p.m. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

five Camille A. Brown dancers

Buzzing About Bugs!
Feb. 23 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. An original work by 11-year-old Winston Schneider of Omaha, presented in partnership with Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium. Tickets: $15. 2 p.m. 402.345.0202.
ticketomaha.com

Shen Yun
Feb. 25 & 26 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Combining ancient legends and modern technology, this troupe brings a unique performance of Chinese dance to the stage. Tickets: $80-$165. 7:30 p.m. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

Once
Feb. 28-March 22 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. An Irish musician falls in love with a Czech immigrant. Based on the Oscar-winning film. Tickets: $24+ adults, $18+ students. Times vary. 402.553.0800.
ticketomaha.com

The Diary of Anne Frank
Feb. 28-March 15 at Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. A live stage performance of the story of Anne Frank. Tickets: $20 non-members, $12 members. Times vary. 402.345.4849.
rosetheater.org

Stomp
Feb. 28 & 29 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Traditional instruments make way for matchboxes, wooden poles, garbage cans, hubcaps and more in this inventive performance.Tickets: $25-$85. 7:30 p.m. 402.661.8501.
ticketomaha.com

drummers, percussion on fence in STOMP

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This calendar was printed in the January/February 2020 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe

May 2019 Stage Performances

April 16, 2019 by and

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.


Stage Performances

Dragons Love Tacos
May 3-5 & 10-12 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. In this hilarious adaptation of Adam Rubin’s giggle-generating book, Boy and his faithful fido, Leroy, are swept up into the “Dos & Don’ts” of serving tasty treats to big beasts. Times vary. Tickets: $22.50. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Men on Boats
May 3-26 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Led by an all-female cast, this is the “true-ish” story of 10 explorers charting the course of the Colorado River in 1869. Guided by a one-armed captain, the outlandish but loyal crew encounters various disasters, conflicts, and harrowing adventures along the way. Times vary. Tickets: $30. 402-345-0606.
omahaplayhouse.com

Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert
May 3-4 at the Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. The Star Wars saga begins in Omaha with the groundbreaking blockbuster screened with John Williams’ Academy Award-winning score performed in its entirety. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$89. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Star Wars poster, A New Hope

Star Wars: A New Hope

The Wizard of Oz
May 4 at the Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. In a world premiere production, American Midwest Ballet takes us dancing down the Yellow Brick Road in this imaginative full-length ballet. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $27-$67. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

One Man, Two Guvnors
Through May 5 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. When out-of-work Francis becomes employed by two men, he goes to great lengths to serve both employers without them finding out about each other. But soon, cases of mistaken identity and the introduction of several unusual characters begin to thwart his plan. Times vary. Tickets: $36. 402-345-0606.
omahaplayhouse.com

Vietnam Ghosts
May 9-25 at the Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. It’s 1969 and the U.S. is embroiled in the Vietnam War. Private George Andrews has been killed in action, but before his spirit can move on, he has some unfinished business that needs to be completed. Times vary. Tickets: $30+. 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

Alex Gemignani
May 11 at the Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Celebrated actor Alex Gemignani brings his talent to the intimate setting of the 1200 Club in the Holland Center. This actor, director, and composer (who you may know from his work in Carousel, Chicago, Les Miserables, Sweeney Todd, or Hamilton) brings the glitz of Broadway to Omaha. 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $40 advanced, $45 day of show. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Alex Gemignani

Alex Gemignani

Imomsohard: Mom’s Night Out Round 2
May 12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Moms, best friends, and funny ladies Kristin Hensley and Jen Smedley are the creators of the web series, #IMOMSOHARD. 8 p.m. Tickets: $49.25-$199.25. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Woodsman
May 16-June 16 at Bluebarn Theatre, 1106 10th St. A re-imagined tale of the origin of L. Frank Baum’s The Tin Woodman of Oz, The Woodsman gives the darkly beautiful, haunting, and heartbreaking story a new life through music, storytelling, and puppetry. Thursday-Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 6 p.m. or 2 p.m. Tickets: $35 general admission, $30 senior. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Samuel J. Comroe
May 16 at FunnyBone Comedy Club, 17305 Davenport St. A Los Angeles native and winner of Rickey Gervais’ comedy competition, “Just Sayin,’” Comroe’s comedy is made up of the trials and tribulations of living with Tourettes syndrome after being diagnosed at age 6. Tickets: $20-$30. 7:30 p.m. 402-493-8036.
omaha.funnybone.com

Derek Hough
May 21 at the Orpheum Theatre, 409 S. 16th St. Fans will journey through a true fusion of dance and music as Derek Hough explores styles ranging from ballroom and tap to salsa and hip-hop and everything in between. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $49.50+. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Derek Hough

Derek Hough

Omaha Improv Fest 2019
May 23-26 at multiple locations. This seventh annual event will host over 70 shows with teams and performers from all over the U.S for four nights of improv fun, including Katie O’Brien and her group the Katydids, who produce the hit sitcom Teachers, and Bob Wiltfong from The Daily Show. Times vary. Tickets: $5-$20 per show. 402-720-7670.
omahaimprovfest.com

Marilyn Maye
May 24 at the Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Highly praised actress and singer Marilyn Maye brings her talent to the intimate setting of the 1200 Club in the Holland Center. This Grammy-nominated recording artist, actress, director, arranger, and educator brings her art of song and performance to Omaha. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $30. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Love & Laughter Comedy Show
May 26 at Jesse’s Place, 2311 N. 24th St. Laugh with Vanessa Fraction of Def Comedy Jam and Tony Woods of BET’s ComicView at their upcoming show. Live music from Enjoli & Timeless, an R&B band from right here in Omaha. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Tickets: $25 advanced, $30 day of show, $45 VIP. 402-819-7773.
@jessesplace on Facebook

Miss Saigon
May 28-June 2 at the Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Experience the acclaimed new production of this legendary musical. This is the epic story of a young Vietnamese woman named Kim who meets an American G.I. and changes her life forever. Times vary. Tickets: $35-95. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Miss Saigon

Miss Saigon

Ragtime
May 31-June 30 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Set in the melting pot of New York City at the turn of the century, the lives of a wealthy white couple, a determined Jewish immigrant, and an African-American ragtime musician intertwine, creating a rich tapestry of American life. Times vary. Tickets: $42. 402-345-0606.
omahaplayhouse.com

My Fair Lady
May 31 & June 1-9 at Chanticleer Community Theater, 830 Franklin Ave. Known as “the perfect musical,” My Fair Lady is based on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. Classic characters Eliza Doolittle and Henry Higgins illuminate this story of a poor flower girl’s rise to royalty. Times vary. Tickets: $80 adults, $64 seniors, $40 students. 712-323-9955.
chanticleertheater.com

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This calendar was printed in the May edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Curtain Calling

March 2, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Growing up, Laura Leininger-Campbell was an introverted bookworm who dreamt of being an actor and had an imagination that ran as wild as her naturally curly hair. She would go on to establish her own singular course in the arts, with a steadfast love of theater and storytelling acting as her compass.

Leininger-Campbell avidly participated in high school plays before earning a degree in theater from Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. She’d have her first run-in with the legacy of famed playwright Eugene O’Neill there—though it wouldn’t be her last.    

“[Connecticut College] had a great theater program and many ties to the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center the next town over in Waterford,” she says. “New London is actually where O’Neill lived. His childhood home—the Monte Cristo Cottage, [depicted] in Long Day’s Journey Into Night—is there.”

After college, Leininger-Campbell moved to New York City, where her expectations of an acting career were humbled by the reality of paying the bills. Three years later, she realized her day job with hat designer Tracey Tooker left little time for auditions and the then-nebulous-to-her concept of networking.   

“They do a much better job teaching kids to manage creative careers now,” she says. “I ended up getting pretty fried, so I gave up on it, moved back to Omaha, and started over. I told myself I wouldn’t do theater anymore, and tried to make peace with that.”

But her calling kept calling. A role in Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre’s The Cherry Orchard helped her establish strong ties there, which extended throughout the Omaha theater community as she took on more roles. Leininger-Campbell found herself living the dream on her own terms. 

“I was actually enjoying a life of theater and making a living,” she says.

Leininger-Campbell’s next star turn emerged when her career as a playwright germinated. She says it began with several adaptations she wrote for the Joslyn Castle Literary Festival: Wuthering Heights, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and The Jewel of Seven Stars.   

“At that point, I really liked the idea of writing—taking specific ideas from the [original] writer and putting them on the page in a compelling way,” she says. “My acting background really helped me understand the structure of compelling scenes and what makes for good conflict.”

Playwright Ellen Struve noticed her knack for theatrical storytelling and encouraged her to create original script work.

“Ellen was instrumental in getting me going. She gave me a little notebook and said, ‘I think you have real stories in you. Go write them down.’ She was very influential, and she was the first person I called when I was done. I said, ‘I think I wrote something.’ And that something I wrote was Eminent Domain,” Leininger-Campbell says. 

The play employs wit, humor, and powerful emotion to tell the poignant story of a Nebraska family whose farm is threatened by the construction of an oil pipeline. Leininger-Campbell spent lots of time on her own family’s farm growing up. The agrarian inspiration motivated her to write something inspired by news about the Keystone XL pipeline.        

“I wanted to write about a farm family…and those memories of people who just remain in your heart. That story fit so perfectly with what I saw happening with KXL,” says Leininger-Campbell. “Much of my impetus to start writing comes from outrage, and once I identify my outrage, I try to understand both sides and expose them so people have something to talk about on the way home from the theater…I tried to depict both sides in Eminent Domain.”

Eminent Domain progressed from a notebook to a reading at the Shelterbelt Theatre to its world premiere, sold-out run at the Omaha Community Playhouse in 2017. Leininger-Campbell’s next touchpoint with the legacy of Eugene O’Neill came when Eminent Domain was named a 2016 Eugene O’Neill National Playwrights Conference finalist.     

“Laura’s script came to my attention after its public reading at Shelterbelt Theatre, and I fell in love with it immediately,” says Kimberly Faith Hickman, artistic director at Omaha Community Playhouse. I’m proud and honored to see this story enter the canon of American theatre, and for Omaha Community Playhouse to have been the home for its world premiere.”

“The reaction we had at the Playhouse was great,” says Leininger-Campbell, who’s sent queries nationwide for the piece. “Part of it’s about the pipeline, but really it’s about a family that has to join together in trying times, and I can’t think of a better time than right now, when people are so polarized, to see a polarized family having to cleave together to solve their own problems. It’s a Nebraska story, but it’s an American play.”

Leininger-Campbell credits director Amy Lane for helping to clarify and enhance aspects of the script, and the cast for bringing the show to life. She also cites her husband, author/musician Michael Campbell, who was the first to read the play and later contributed the production’s music.

“He wrote these beautiful, amazing tunes, just on the knowledge of what he’d read about the characters. I was really lucky to have him as a collaborator,” says Leininger-Campbell.

KXL pipeline fighter Jane Kleeb attended the Shelterbelt reading—offering helpful feedback afterwards—and the Playhouse premiere.

While she plans to do some acting in 2018, Leininger-Campbell is fully embracing the role of playwright. This year, audiences can anticipate Leininger-Campbell’s Terminal. The comedy tells the story of a group of people stuck inside an airport terminal who “get on each others’ nerves and slowly their humanity begins to melt away.”

Leininger-Campbell says her biggest wish is more time to write, and while time is a finite resource, she has ideas aplenty.

“I like to identify stories and then just tuck them away to mine later,” says Leininger-Campbell. “I love the process of writing and bringing those stories to life.”

Learn more about Laura Leininger-Campbell at lalaplaywright.com.

This article was printed in the March/April 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.