Tag Archives: OBI Creative

A Gallery of Artists Showcasing Their Crafts

January 20, 2020 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

At OBI Creative, walking up the stairs to the second floor as the hallway rounds the bend leads to floor-to-almost-ceiling glass panes reflecting sunshine from the west basking the hallway in a glow of warm, white light.

A wall of glass panes encases the office. Where a ceiling would normally hit is a row of rectangular mirrors extending from the glass wall at an angle that grows larger as it stretches the length of the entrance. The effect reflects the words ‘hope is not a strategy’ on the ground.

“The idea [behind the mirrors] was that we understand that you as a client or a prospective client, this is about you,” said Mary Ann O’Brien, founder and CEO of OBI Creative. “It’s not about us.”

OBI Creative produces aesthetically charming work. The office is a showcase of that brilliant work—with light gray concrete floors and crisp white walls accented with an array of saturated pink, green, blue, and purple jewel-tones. But nothing in this office exists solely for pleasure. Every detail is intentional—from the dark brown plank brought from their previous office in Midtown that hangs outside O’Brien’s office as a reminder to be brave to a writable wall with artwork depicting the right and left brain in the main collaborative space.  The wall’s artwork is a visual to help the strategic and creative sides of the business to come together and share ideas.

The open office concept is a hit at OBI Creative. It allows them to have the kinetic energy that comes from organic collaboration that O’Brien feels is essential for a business. It is something they didn’t have at their old office.

The old office also didn’t have a lot of natural light. When designing the office at the Lumberyard District in Millard, having lots of natural light was non-negotiable.

The office has so much light coming from the windows on both sides of the building, the skinny fluorescent lights hanging diagonally across the exposed white ceiling are hardly noticeable.

As things are rarely straightforward in advertising and marketing, at the OBI office, 90-degree lines are hardly visible.

“Nothing’s normal at all,” O’Brien says. “I don’t like predictable at all. Even the way we hung the lights was by design. There’s lots of angles. I like color and lights. I wanted everything to be art.”

giant Lite Brite at OBI Creative

That goes for the overall design of the office space, as different textures of wood and concrete mix with plaster and plastic as well as physical artwork on the walls like the custom giant Light Brite that spans from floor to ceiling to the lion spirit animal made of the brand’s colors to a framed shattered glass pane representing breaking the glass ceiling. It’s not beautiful for beauty’s sake. It’s functional art with intention.

A big theme at OBI is that everyone is an artist of their own craft. And what does every artist need to thrive? Inspiration.

O’Brien knows that, which is why it’s her intention to have everything in the office “light you up.” In the same way walking through a gallery and stopping to admire pieces of art gives perspective and sparks the imagination. Creativity gets results.


Visit obicreative.com for more information.

This article was printed in the February/March 2020 edition of B2B. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

the lobby at OBI Creative

This sponsored content appeared in the December 2018/January 2019 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/bb1218_flipbook/30


According to a 2010 study by the U.S. Department of Labor, women comprised 47 percent of the total U.S. labor force. That same study found that women comprise 91.1 percent of registered nurses, but also 66.1 percent of tax examiners, collectors, and revenue agents, and 59.3 percent of all insurance writers.

The National Association of Women Business Owners revealed in 2015 that women-owned firms account for 31 percent of all privately held firms.

The women on these sponsored pages own or represent a variety of businesses, from those that have been traditionally male-dominated, to those run by all-female teams, to those that encourage diversity in the workplace. They are advertising professionals, real estate agents, urban planners, and more.


ASHLEY PERKINS
COX COMMUNICATIONS

11505 W. DODGE ROAD OMAHA, NE 68154
402.934.3223
cox.com

GAIL DEBOER
COBALT 

7148 TOWNE CENTER PARKWAY PAPILLION, NE 68046
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REVELA TEAM
REVELA

1508 LEAVENWORTH ST.
Omaha, NE 68102
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revelagroup.com

MEDIA BUYING TEAM
OBI CREATIVE 

4909 S. 135th ST., SUITE 200 OMA

HA, NE 68137
402.493.7999
info@obicreative.com
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SHAYNE FILI
AUCTION SOLUTIONS, INC.

7811 MILITARY AVE. OMAHA, NE 68134
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KELSEY ELMAN GOLDSMITH
ELMAN PRINT

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BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

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BLOOM COMPANION CARE

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ANGELIA THOMAS
LEYDEN, THOMAS AND ASSOCIATES

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ameripriseadvisors.com/team/leyden-thomas-associates

BARBARA CHRISTIANSON
INGERSOLL RAND

13205 CENTENNIAL ROAD OMAHA, NE 68138
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ingersollrandproducts.com

ROBIN SPENCER
TLR COACHING

robin@tlrcoaching.com
tlrcoaching.com

LORI KIRKPATRICK, TAHNEE CHEDEL
HEARTS AND FIRE

11015 ELM ST. OMAHA, NE 68144
402.884.1106
@heartsfireco on Facebook

STEPHANIE CLARK
NAI NP DODGE

12915 WEST DODGE ROAD OMAHA, NE 68154
402.255.6070
nainpdodge.com

CRYSTAL CUNNINGHAM, LEA SCHUSTER,
AMY HAASE
RDG PLANNING & DESIGN 

900 FARNAM ST., SUITE 100 OMAHA, NE 68102
402.392.0133
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NOREEN THELEN
LOMBARDO’S

13110 BIRCH DR. OMAHA, NE 68164
402.884.9800
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KELLY BURNS
PAYROLL PROFESSIONALS

2829 SOUTH 88TH ST. OMAHA, NE 68124
402.618.2804
payrollprofessionalsomaha.com

JILL DAVIE
TEAM SOFTWARE

407 S. 27TH AVE. OMAHA, NE 68131
800.500.4499
teamsoftware.com

Moving Day

March 16, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

The days of building an office park in the suburbs are gone.

Companies in Omaha and across the country are picking up and moving to hip urban hubs of their respective cities, letting go of a long-standing notion that most of the nation’s workers want to work and live in slower, quieter areas of town, far away from the noise, crowds, and chaos of city life.

Today, as executives strive to attract tech-minded young professionals who want to work, shop, eat, and play in the same neighborhood, Omaha companies are increasingly mindful that a key way to do that is to relocate to some of the fastest-growing—and just plain coolest—areas of the city. Even if they were not in the suburbs before, corporations are seeing that relocating in the most popular areas of town is good business.

“People like urban,” says developer Jay Noddle, president and CEO of Noddle Companies, which is working with engineering and architecture firm HDR Inc. on building a new site for Kiewit Corp.’s new headquarters in north downtown Omaha. “It’s pretty hip, and it’s important for companies to be in walkable communities. They need to be able to retain their workforce and they want to be able to use their office environments as a working tool.”

The trend is so hot that even suburban areas are transforming into urban oases. OBI Creative will be an anchor tenant at the burgeoning Lumberyard District at 135th and Q streets. The six-block district includes an Eat Fit Go, First American Title Co., and Local Beer & Patio, and is attempting to attract young creatives and professionals.

Executives at OBI Creative, which is currently located near the popular Midtown Crossing, thought the area resembled more urban locations like Dundee or Benson yet was more convenient for their staff.

“The majority of our employees live west of 90th Street,” says Lana LeGrand, vice president—OBI leadership and operations. “At the same time, the location afforded us easy interstate access to serve our clients regardless of the location.”

The Lumberyard District was the perfect setting for an advertising agency, she says. 

“When we saw this area, not just the potential of the office space, but the vibe of the neighborhood, we felt we had found a location where our employees would thrive and our clients would love to visit,” LeGrand says.

And while HDR is helping other companies move, the architecture firm itself is moving its corporate headquarters from 84th Street and West Dodge Road to one of the most hip and bustling areas of the city—Aksarben Village—later this year. The new, 245,000 square-feet of office space will house retailers and employ more than 1,100 people. HDR opted to move because it had outgrown its longtime location and its executives’ desired to bring as many people as possible to the location. They also want to provide plenty of parking and entertainment amenities for workers and clients.

“I’m excited for our employees that we will be moving to a new headquarters by the end of this year,” HDR Chairman and CEO Eric Keen says. “It’s an exciting new chapter for us as we begin our second century here in Omaha.”

Rex Fischer, HDR’s senior vice president and corporate relations director, says Aksarben Village will “fit our needs and will serve us well into the future. We stand to be more effective in how our people work and collaborate…a modern headquarters stands to be an excellent recruiting tool.”

Kiewit’s new downtown location, which is expected to be ready as early as 2020, was chosen because of its closeness to Kiewit University, the company’s new training center. Noddle says company leaders were mindful of the move’s potential influence on north downtown.

“It’s full of hotels, restaurants, and entertainment venues, and this can only benefit those businesses,” he says. “Moving a major business in a community is one of the things leadership might think about. Others will follow, I think, as it will inspire other businesses to look very hard at that area where everything is growing.”

Adds Noddle, “The image of bringing 600 new, stable, and well-compensated jobs to north downtown can and will have a positive impact in that area.”

Noddle says Kiewit’s move to north downtown will help open up its current space in the growing Blackstone District, which has been booming in recent years. Young professionals will be more attracted to Omaha when they see there are diverse urban areas for them to work and live in.

“It’s very attractive to current and future employees,” he says. “They could go anywhere, but they will choose to come here.”

HDR’s headquarters under construction in Aksarben Village

This article was printed in the April/May 2018 edition of B2B.