Tag Archives: Morgan Stanley

Matt Darling

April 27, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

The Omaha Community Foundation was designed to pool donations into a coordinated investment and grant-making facility dedicated to Omaha’s social improvement.

Learning and/or knowing the people of the community to help improve Omaha’s social services is an especially vital skill for OCF’s vice president of donor services, Matt Darling. Darling’s job is multi-faceted; ultimately, he is responsible for helping donors achieve their desired level of giving.

When people determine they want to give money, no matter how big or how small, Omaha Community Foundation starts an account for that donor. The money itself is held at Wells Fargo, and the OCF executive staff works with their board of directors to manage the assets. Donors opening accounts of at least $25,000 then have a donor advised fund. That fund is exposed to market trends, meaning it could go up or down with the stock market.

The donor services work involves collaborating with Omaha’s community of financial advisers to help bring funds into the foundation, often answering questions about where is the best place to use funds. Each account is individualized, so donors are able to manage their own money. Some donors want OCF to keep track of how their account is doing, while others know exactly where they want their dollars to be spent. It involves creating relationships with each donor and figuring out what they want, a skill in which others say Darling excels.

“Matt doesn’t need to have the right idea in the room, but he’ll find the right idea,” says Kevin Welsh, senior vice president of the Welsh Friesen Group at Morgan Stanley. “He wants to get it right. There’s no alternative motive with him other than what’s right for the situation.”

That desire to get it right comes from the desire to work for the community. It’s a switch from his previous job as co-owner of Paramount Parking. In 2013, with a fiancée and a desire to start a family, Darling began considering the idea of working at a nonprofit.

He reached out to Sara Boyd, OCF executive director, for a lunch meeting—one that turned out to have longtime implications.

“The first lunch we went to, I knew he was the right fit [for OCF],” Boyd says. “He is smart and business-savvy, as well as kind, artistic, and analytical.”

Although she did not have a  job opening at the time, she hired him as director of donor services later that year.

A larger part of this work is building relationships with the 1,500 OCF donors, whether they are giving $100 or $1 million.

“Matt’s really thoughtful,” Welsh says. “You can talk to him, or someone with $5-6 billion can talk to him, and they are the same to him.”

It’s a necessary skill for the job that requires a unique quality, as the donor services department works with people from all walks of life. Darling takes it in stride.

“When you think of philanthropy, you think of a wealthy man in a suit. That’s not necessarily the case,” Darling says.

Using OCF to discover where to give means engaging in a network of like-minded philanthropists and philanthropic organizations. The donor relations team researches specific nonprofits to provide donors (and potential donors) with in-depth details about nonprofit programs, leadership, target populations, goals, and uses of funds. They also research issues and causes that donors and potential donors identify with and let people know what organizations would work well for them.

While the donor relations team works with individuals and corporations, Darling particularly enjoys working with families in the areas of family giving and succession planning, in which one family will choose a specific charity to give to throughout various family members’ lifetimes.

“It’s very satisfying,” Darling says. “We’ve been working with some families now for two, three generations.”

Navigating the wishes of multiple generations can be tricky. The first generation’s idea of the perfect nonprofit may not be the same as the second generation’s idea, and the second generation sometimes sits back and feels ignored.

Darling refuses to let that happen.

“Matt is excellent at bringing people to the table and asking what is meaningful to the individuals and taking something that will be meaningful to people on all sides of that conversation,” Boyd says.

He already had a bachelor’s degree in business and studio art from Hastings College. But to learn more about nonprofit funding, Darling enrolled in American College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. He earned a Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy designation, learning about family wealth dynamics and nonprofits.

He didn’t stop there; he now helps to facilitate CAP study groups with SilverStone Group’s Mark Weber. The facilitator role keeps him connected with the local financial advising community.

“The lectures are online. At the OCF, I brought the idea to them to host study groups of professional advisers,” Weber says. “(Darling) helps invite guests, helps facilitate the classes…We’ve had panels of nonprofit directors. We’ve had panels of heads of private foundations. I’ve had panels of professional advisers on how best to work together, and a number of high-profile philanthropists who have shared their life story about their philanthropy.”

Darling brings people together for the common good of trying to strengthen the amount of giving in the community. He uses his knowledge to work with his OCF team, which includes CFO Melisa Sunde and vice president of community relations Kali Baker, among many others. Through the team effort, the organization has enabled more than $1 billion to be donated throughout Omaha since its inception in 1982. That means the city that is 42nd in size in America is the 17th highest for charitable dollars.

“I’ve never worked in a place where the entire staff is so focused on doing good,” Darling says. “The team is second to none.”

He, along with his team, takes a great pride in making this community a better place for everyone.

“I live an incredibly fortunate life,” Darling says.

Visit omahafoundation.org for more information.

This article appeared in the May/June 2017 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Matt Darling

The Welsh Group at Morgan Stanley

October 21, 2013 by

What is your philosophy on what it means to be a financial advisory practice?
We believe: Clear and consistent communication is paramount; our word is our bond; in transparency; investments should not be driven by emotion; CNBC will not change our plan; process and procedure are cornerstone; in managing debt as well as equity; diversification is a key to reducing risk.

What is the process you take each customer through?
We take each client through the 13 Wealth Management Issues. 1. Investment Issues 2. Insurance Issues 3. Liability Issues 4. Qualified Retirement Plan Issues 5. Stock Option Issues 6. Business Succession Issues 7. Durable Power of Attorney/Will 8. Gifting to Children/Descendant Issues 9. Charitable Gifting Before and After Death 10. Title of Assets Issues 11. Executor Trustee Issues 12. Distribution of Wealth 13. Charitable Inclinations at Death.

In your own words, describe your practice’s financial planning process.
The Welsh Group has a defined financial planning process.  We start with the 13 Wealth Management Issues.  After discovering clients’ current and long term needs and positions, we drill down on areas that need work and then provide solutions for those issues.  After implementation, we continually monitor plans to make sure we are on track to achieve goals and expectations.

How is your team different?
We design, implement, and maintain comprehensive financial solutions for clients with complex financial needs. These clients are business owners, executives, and retirees with those backgrounds. Our unique service model monitors every aspect of the tailored financial plan for each client, including investing, insurance, lending services, and estate planning strategies. We ensure adjustments are made in order to maintain the course of action agreed upon to accomplish every goal set forth in that plan.

What are the responsibilities of each individual on the team?
Kevin’s focus is in the capital markets. He buys and sells all of the fixed income for the client portfolios. Along with Patrick, he designs and develops individual strategies for client portfolios. Patrick is a CFP®. He and Kevin collaborate on plan design and strategy for each client. Patrick is in charge of implementation and maintenance of the investments and financial plan. Dawn is in charge of all aspects of administration in our practice. Morgan Stanley invests hundreds of millions in capital every day and provides access to the markets, research, private placements, alternative investments, insurance, and lending services. This access helps us implement our clients’ plans and achieve their definition of success.

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC offers insurance products in conjunction with its licensed insurance agency affiliates. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“Morgan Stanley”), its affiliates and Morgan Stanley Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice.

The Welsh Group at Morgan Stanley
13625 California St., Ste. 400

Omaha, NE 68154
402-399-1541
morganstanleyfa.com/thewelshgroup

The Militti Group at Morgan Stanley

What is your client mission and how do you provide added value?
On a proactive basis we deliver the finest financial thinking, solutions, education and client services to help our clientele achieve their retirement and wealth management needs. We are focused:  our practice is high net-wealth investors seeking solutions to complex wealth scenarios. Typically, this means corporate executives, highly compensated professionals, business owners (and their business), as well as those who come into inheritance. Because we work with high net-wealth people we are experienced in arenas such as trust set-up and management, estate planning and tax-advantaged gifting strategies. We are also well-versed in setting up and administering foundations and endowments designed to fulfill our clientele’s passionate philanthropic dreams. Our clients truly want to make a meaningful difference in the lives of others. So to help them, we take a deep dive with each client and immerse ourselves in what is meaningful in their life.  The outcome:  each client is delivered an ownable, unique plan. Importantly, we believe an air-tight wealth management plan includes a great deal of time spent on risk-management strategies—so we manage both sides of a client’s balance sheet. This means we assist our clientele with customized insurances, as well as retail and commercial banking and lending solutions through our access to Morgan Stanley Private Bank.

How does your team differentiate itself from other wealth advisory groups?
Our team is unique in that we are a true family practice: father, daughter and son. That’s not common in this business.  In addition, because we focus our efforts on high net-wealth clientele we often accomplish our mission by introducing a client (or referral) to our firm’s Wealth Planning Center. Together, the Militti Group and the Wealth Planning Center bring tremendous experience and perspective to help develop and execute highly sophisticated retirement and multigenerational wealth strategies. It is great to see our clientele wowed with the breadth and depth of services we and our firm can offer them. The truest satisfaction we see is our clientele worry less, so they spend more time enjoying their life and family.

Morgan Stanley and its Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice. Individuals should seek advice based on their particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC offers insurance products in conjunction with its licensed insurance agency affiliates. Private Bankers are employees of Morgan Stanley Private Bank, National Association, Member FDIC. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

The Militti Group at Morgan Stanley
13625 California Street, Ste. 400

Omaha, NE 68154
402-399-1513
morganstanleyfa.com/milittigroup