Tag Archives: Hulu

The Break-Point Generation

June 20, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

It’s not an uncommon tradition. The Roemmich family gathers every year for a reunion. It’s also not uncommon at such reunions to have boxes of black-and-white photos of family members no one can identify any more.

So Ron Roemmich decided to create a video cataloging all the family he and his siblings still could name—a historical record for the younger generations.

Just one problem. Ron didn’t know how to create this video.

Ron and his wife, Berdeen, signed up for a movie-making class at Metro Community College. Their class was taught by Laurie Brodeur, a semi-retired Millard teacher who now leads six technology courses in Metro’s continuing education curriculum.

Although Brodeur was “very gracious with senior citizens,” Ron admits to feeling behind the other eight or nine students—and like he was taking up a lot of Brodeur’s attention during the class period.

“I suppose the real confession is: We had her come back and help us after the class was over,” he says.

“We’re kind of the break-point generation. People 10 years younger than us are probably okay. But anybody over 60, I bet 50 percent know what they’re doing [with computers].” – Ron Roemmich

Having a project with a firm deadline made learning the program an imperative goal. “It was fun, but it would be desperately frustrating if you didn’t have a goal,” Ron says. And though they had 500 photos, “It was not gonna whip us.”

The Roemmiches were pleased with their final product. In fact, they made two more videos for a reunion of Ron’s doctoral classmates, making good use of their new movie-making skills.

Even so, Ron says, “We’ve explored I’d say 1 percent of what a computer can do for us.”

The Roemmiches do have a Facebook account but only check it when their kids tell them to. After checking their 100-200 e-mails per day, Berdeen says, “you don’t want to go on Facebook. You’re just tired.”

“We’re kind of the break-point generation,” Ron says. “People 10 years younger than us are probably okay. But anybody over 60, I bet 50 percent know what they’re doing—or would that be 20 percent? Not a lot.”

It doesn’t take much to fall behind in technology. “When it could have burst open for me,” Ron says, “would have been in the ’80s maybe. But my boss was afraid of computers, so he told the rest of us we should leave them alone. So we really got behind. And now we don’t even know the language.”

Along with computers are phones, televisions, and other electronic systems. Like the DVR the Roemmiches got for Christmas and don’t really understand how to use.

Asking people for help is the best way Berdeen knows to learn something new. That and practicing. “You just have to keep using it and trying different things,” she says.

Brodeur is one of those people the Roemmiches will ask for help. And she would agree with Berdeen: Practice and patience are key.

“Students can see their progression from one class to the next and enjoy being able to go home and try their skills and return to the next class in the series with questions.” – Emily Getzschman, marketing and media relations manager with Omaha Public Library

Among her Metro classes is a series of technology update courses for seniors (although non-seniors are of course also welcome). The first class is broad, covering things like the difference between a browser and a search engine; the many uses of Google; and introductions to some sites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Hulu. It helps students become comfortable using the computer.

Exploring those sites is important, Brodeur says, because “you can use Google and YouTube to learn how to do almost anything on your computer.”

The second and third levels help set students up with Facebook accounts and learn more and more about using the program.

Brodeur loves to see her students have an “aha” moment and tries to always stress that no question is a stupid one. This is important, because adults rarely like to admit when they don’t know something. Overall, she says, it is a very positive experience because her students come eager to learn with optimistic attitudes.

Omaha Public Library also offers computer classes for beginners and older adults. OPL partners with AARP for a series that gives an introduction to computers, including training on Microsoft Word, e-mail, and the internet. Seniors who are not new to computers can take classes for specialized software to manipulate photos, create greeting cards, and learn how to use social media tools, like Facebook and Pinterest. Classes can even aid seniors who are unexpectedly re-entering the job market.

Emily Getzschman, marketing and media relations manager for OPL, says that the introductory classes offered in a series are very well-attended. “Students can see their progression from one class to the next and enjoy being able to go home and try their skills and return to the next class in the series with questions and to build on their new computer experiences,” Getzschman says.

Classes are free, with no limit on the number of times you can take them. And they’re offered every month.

Like at Metro, the library class instructors strive to make students feel supported, never stupid. Getzschman has heard students say the instructors “were patient and let the student work at a comfortable pace.”

 

A resource guide for seniors can be found at http://guides.omahalibrary.org/Seniors.

What’s All the Hoopla About Hulu?

February 25, 2013 by

Just to set the stage in the simplest of terms: Hulu is streaming TV (and a movie service with original content, but put this part aside for a minute). News Corp. and NBCUniversal started Hulu as internet video in 2007 as a single website offering the previous night’s episode of The Simpsons. From those humble yet visionary beginnings, the service has grown dramatically. This year, it’s on pace to exceed $600 million in revenue. Most of Hulu’s 25 million unique visitors access Hulu for free, but more than 2 million willingly pay $7.99 a month to access Hulu’s full library of programs from all six major broadcast networks and more than 400 content providers. That’s a reported 5,482 TV series and film titles, 181,020 videos, and more.

Put in even simpler terms, Hulu is TV—just watched differently by time-crunched, multi-screen viewers. And this is where the traditional businessperson who wants to reach people has to put her head. Not-so-traditional marketers are adding Hulu to media plans to supplement the reach of TV gained the traditional way via network, cable, and spot schedules.

Hulu serves up ads to both free access and paying viewers. Before the requested program streams, ads are served up for view. Users show tolerance for ads and are even asked if the ads are “relevant” to them. If they are, they may get an ad of similar relevance served up that they can sit through or skip. According to ComSource.com July 2012 online video rankings, Hulu leads the way serving 46.4 ads per viewer per month. Hulu says 96 percent of those ads are watched in full. Average age of viewer: 38, skewing younger and about even male/female.

The young digital natives likely made it what it is today, but the user demos are expanding in age and showing a solid $85,000 average household income with 33 percent over $100,000. That’s why Hulu’s roster of more than 1,000 advertisers is growing, too, including national brands Geico and Toyota.

Don’t misunderstand: Network and cable TV are nowhere near dead. But viewership is down 12.5 percent since Hulu’s launch and 3.6 million U.S. residents have abandoned pay-TV for internet video in the last five years. Ask the people under 30 in your office if they even own a TV…

Hulu is one way to reach the multi-screen, time-shifted viewer. And at just four minutes of ads served up pre-program streaming vs. average eight minutes of ads on commercial breaks on network TV, Hulu brags that general, brand, and message recall plus likability are all higher among their viewers. Not bad attributes once you can get your head around “Hulu is TV.”