Tag Archives: future

Sales Insider

April 5, 2017 by

I love sales. It is a career where you, the sales professional, determine your income based on how skillfully you execute the duty. It has a feel of independence, ownership, and entrepreneurship, and it can be extremely rewarding. Professional selling is regarded as one of the top-earning careers on the the planet. Note to you business owners out there: If your salespeople are making more money than you, don’t be jealous, be excited because they are building your business and increasing its value.

The term “commission” is familiar to ranks of sales professionals. However, I want you to think about your income a little differently. Rather than earning commission when a sale is made, think about your pay as an hourly wage. What makes your hourly pay different from the familiar, traditional hourly jobs is that your hourly rate will change based on the activity you happen to be doing at the moment. For example, in my previous career, for every 10 presentations I made, I would close on, and get paid commission for, three orders. On the three projects I won, my hourly rate was great, but on the projects I lost, my hourly rate was $0/hour. I thought “this is just how it is in sales,” so I did little to change or improve my sales performance until I was taught to think of my compensation as hourly. Spending 60 hours per week on sending proposals to my customers meant missing out on my kids’ activities and time with family, all so I could get paid for 30 percent of my time. That made me angry. This is madness, yet a vast majority of salespeople would give you a similar story.

I think there is a better way to sell that will pay more per hour, which means one can earn their desired wage in less time. I just need to figure out how to get rid of the seven prospects who don’t buy quickly and only spend time on the three who will buy. If I can figure this out, then I will close the three orders, so my pay is the same as before, but I do not spend much time on the seven who do not buy. Can you see how my hourly wage more than doubles?

Since your time is just as valuable as your prospects’ time, only the prospects who plan to buy from you get any of it. In order to do this, you must sort all prospects who talk to you as either buyers or window shoppers. The first step in doing this is to recognize that there are four possible outcomes of a sales call: yes, no, maybe, and clear future. Let’s examine each one.

Yes: Congratulations! You achieved an order and you will earn money.

No: Shoot! Shake it off. There are plenty of other customers out there who will buy. Did you know that “no” outcomes are good, and they can actually make you money? If you get a “no,” that opportunity no longer consumes your time, which means you can divert time to those who buy, and your hourly rate actually increases.

Maybe: Stay away from the dreaded “I need to think it over.” These outcomes represent the “window shoppers” and will cost you money. These prospects waste your time and consume your resources. Therefore, when a prospect stalls, push them to “no.”  At least a “no” will make you money.

Clear future: Sometimes your product or service cannot be sold in one call. You might need multiple meetings to formulate the solution and make the sale. This positive outcome is for those prospects who see value in your solution, are willing to move the process forward, and want the sales conversation to continue on a specific day at a specific time.

Thus, the rule is “No more maybes.” If you can make this rule part of your selling system, you will increase your hourly rate and significantly grow your sales. You effectively sort the buyers from the window shoppers and spend more time on those who buy. Now, I close three out of four presentations I make, my income has increased by triple digits, and I spend less time doing it all.

So, what is you hourly wage?

Karl Schaphorst is a 27-year veteran of sales who now specializes in training other sales professionals. He is the president of Sandler Training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This article was printed in the Spring 2017 edition of B2B.

Making the Cut

May 5, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

This article appears in May/June 2015 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Film and video production is still a rather male-centric domain, but the realm of editing is much more gender-balanced. Omaha native Taylor Tracy, a music video editor for L.A.-based London Alley, feels right at home in a long lineage of women cutters.

“At the start of the film industry, women were very prominent as film editors,” Tracy says. “It was an extremely delicate process. They used scissors to precisely cut the film. It’s interesting how that role for women as editors has carried through to today’s digital revolution.”

Tracy, whose work can be seen at TaylorTracy.com, has edited videos for Nicki Minaj, Busta Rhymes, Future, Rich Gang, Ciara, K. Michelle, SoMo, Ariana Grande, and Jess Glynne.

Even in the youth-driven music video field, the 2007 Millard West graduate is young at 25. Before landing on the Left Coast, this lifelong music lover earned her chops in music, theater, dance, and photography, teaching herself to shoot and edit video.

She heeded her creative instincts making comedic shorts that gained YouTube followings. She honed her craft at Omaha Video Solutions.

“I knew I wanted more,” says Tracy, who moved to L.A. in 2013 to intern with London Alley director Hannah Lux. It was a homecoming for Tracy, who was born in Long Beach. She shadowed Lux on set and performed post-production duties. She’s still enjoying the ride.

“I love doing music videos because you get to be so creative with your edit,” Tracy says. “With each project I’m trying to find a new style for the specific video and push and grow my style personally.”

All editing is about rhythm, perhaps especially so for music videos.

“I love to let the music guide me. I listen to the undertones of the songs, I follow what I feel in the music. If there’s a nice, long instrumental, I love to see slow motion footage, maybe a nice gradual close-up rather than very quick cuts and lots of movement.”

She says the “demanding, fast-paced environment” allows only a week to condense hours of footage into a three-minute video. Tracy also assists with visual effects and coloring. Additionally, she helps directors complete visual treatments for pitching labels and artists.

Tracy meets some of the artists whose videos she cuts. Despite their often misogynist personas, she says the male hip hop and rap musicians she’s met have been “gentlemanly-like and professional.”

The most viral of videos she’s worked on are Future’s “Move that Dope” and Ariana Grande’s “Love Me Harder.” Her personal favorite is Grammy-winner Jess Glynne’s “Hold My Hand.”

“I really enjoyed the pacing of it. It starts out very slow, with very long cuts. It’s like you’ve spent an entire day with Jess Glynne. I love getting inside the artist’s head and really giving the viewer a chance to see who the artist is and take them on a journey.”

Tracy has ambitions beyond editing music videos. “I’d love to experiment with television—editing a TV show.”

Directing interests her, too.

“That’d be a really great step,” she says. “Seeing the directors in action on set, I’ve learned exactly what goes into making a production happen.”

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Nostalgia

March 9, 2015 by

Originally published in March/April 2015 Omaha Magazine

So an old friend said to me, “I used to like living in Omaha, but now it’s too big.”

Putting aside for the moment the imprecise nature of what “big” is exactly, I do get it. When I got here in 1967, the town’s west side ended at 79th Street. Omaha was referred to proudly as a “15-minute town.” You could get anywhere in 15 minutes. I remember the shift to “a 20 minute town.” Now I think we may have crept up to the half hour mark. But my friend’s problem isn’t distance, or traffic, or sprawl—he’s simply stuck in the past.

It’s impossible to avoid nostalgia.

Oh, there was a day when nostalgia had a bad name, but that was a long time ago, back when we all looked to the future for comfort. (Yes, I do plan to write about irony in my next column.) But back to the future—what went wrong with that?

For a start, every election we’d hear about how “our children are our future.” Now that seems to be an obvious platitude…unless those of us who’ve had children stopped to think for a second about a world run by our kids. When we considered the implications of that seemingly benign premise, the prospect filled us with a deeply felt sense of doom. None of us want to admit it, but the truth is that parents know at a very primal level, despite all of the love and pride we have for our gifted offspring, that these benighted little creatures have no brains.

We’ve observed the tykes at close range over a significant period of time. We’ve observed behaviors that give us cause to examine their skulls for leaks. On top of that we remember when we were “the future.” Look where that got us.

So this whole “future” thing makes us quake in our boots—or, tremble in our Birkenstocks if that is the lifestyle we chose back when we were vacant-minded adolescents.

I loved Popular Science magazine with its glossy, Technicolor artist renderings of flying cars full of happy nuclear families jetting out of the towering spires of some utopian megapolis into the peaceful green countryside where shiny robots milked the farmer’s cows and fed his bright pink pigs. The future? Well, I’ve lived in big cities and I’ve worked on farms. I know there are very few sparkly spires, pink pigs, or perfect families, and there sure as heck aren’t any flying cars.

So we gave up on the future. And that left us only the past—nostalgia.

We long for that fabled 15-minute city, part of some Golden Age, enlightened, peaceful, stable. These yearnings comfort us only so long as we don’t read history, research the ancestral tree, or recall that when we could get around town in a quarter hour, there was really nowhere to go.

For me, the final straw regarding the past occurred when it came to my attention recently that my days on rock radio were part of someone’s idyllic past. “Remember when Otis and Diver had that big election party at Peony Park?”

Oh, the horror! I had become nostalgia personified. The revelation had the same impact as waking up to discover I was a large cockroach. Thank you very much, Franz Kafka.

The future is scary, the past is a dream, and we are left in the unexpected position of having to choose the present…today…the now.

So, my humble suggestion, get in the car and go to Fontenelle Forest. Wander down the walkway to the trails and head down towards the river. Find a spot in the trees and sit down on an old stump. Listen. That’s the now welcoming you.

From my house the drive is exactly 29 minutes.

Otis XII’s newest book, Tales of the Master: The Book of Stone will be released this summer by Grief Illustrated Press.

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Christian Gray

April 25, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

As director of inCOMMON, a nonprofit organization located at 13th and William streets, Christian Gray thrives on building relationships in the Omaha community. Growing up in the affluent suburbs of Orange County, Calif., Gray was rarely exposed to the hardships many Americans face, but somehow he got the message that material wealth is not what life is about.

“When I began to juxtapose a wealthy lifestyle with the lifestyle of millions around the world, and even here locally in the United States, it began to bother me,” Gray admits. “It began to make me uneasy about what life is, and I began asking questions like ‘What is the purpose of life? Is it to be comfortable? Successful?’ I began to challenge a lot of those notions that I think were just part of the culture growing up.”

After graduating from the University of Arizona, where he met his wife, Sonya, Gray began seeking out places where he could help. His passion for helping the poor has taken him from Romania to India to South Africa and back to the U.S. During the process, he had time to really self-reflect on the bigger picture.

“I’m still trying to figure it out, but I think the purpose of life is to live wholly and richly,” he says. “That doesn’t mean you have a ton of stuff or even a ton of success. It means you’re an authentic person, and you care about other people, and you’re part of a greater global community and humanity. I think that’s the answer. I think the way we go about that all looks differently. Locations can change and reflect how we can live that out. I think that’s the purpose of life, to really be a part of enriching the global community.”20130321_bs_8688

Once settled in Omaha, Gray got to work on inCOMMON, which specializes in uniting and strengthening vulnerable neighborhoods. He spearheads many subsidiary programs, such as The Listening Project and Neighbors United.

inCOMMON incorporates Asset-based Community Development (ABCD) practices into its work. ABCD is a best-practice that dates back to the 1970s. “We try to build upon a neighborhood’s pre-existing strengths,” he explains. “We have the Listening Project, where we train volunteers to go into the community and hear from its residents and try to build solutions to their problems.”

As a result of information gathered from The Listening Project around the Park Avenue neighborhood, inCOMMON is preparing to open a community center in June called Park Avenue Commons. Located on the corner of Park Avenue and Woolworth Street, the dilapidated Acme Rug and Carpet Cleaning building is getting a new life as a part of Gray’s vision.

“When I began to juxtapose a wealthy lifestyle with the lifestyle of millions around the world, and even here locally in the United States, it began to bother me.”

“I had a growing compassion for the condition of people that are poor, and I wanted to be a part of creating better futures for our communities in that way,” Gray says. “Park Avenue Commons will provide easier access to social services, emergency and preventative services, and a place to come together as a community.”

Gray has many dedicated volunteers that share the same passion for helping the less fortunate. For example, Omaha resident Leslie Wells is gearing up for a recycling program, in which he provides bikes for the homeless to collect recyclables from downtown businesses. Gray emphasizes it’s about building those relationships in order to cultivate community development and empowerment.

“‘The single greatest cause for sustained poverty is isolation,’” he says, quoting Dr. Robert Lupton of FCS Urban Ministries. “If we look at poverty, at least in an urban context, as people living in an isolated community that are cut off from opportunities, then relationships are key because they allow people to bridge outside their limited ranges to a greater opportunity. Strong neighborhoods require that people know each other and people are cooperative with one another and working to solve problems together. The key to overcoming poverty is to have residents that know each other and work together.”

Comprehensive Assessment

February 25, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

“Our family will forever be indebted to Suzanne,” says Melanie Miller of Suzanne Myers. It was Myers whom Miller turned to when her ailing father needed help. With Miller in New York City, her brothers also living out of Nebraska, Myers, owner of Encompass Senior Solutions, filled in where needed.

“Hands down, she is one of the best people I have ever worked with,” Miller praises.

Myers was basically an extension of their family, caring for Miller’s father in Omaha until he passed away last July. She took care of everything from providing a personal driver when his car keys were taken away to bringing in hospice as his health failed. Myers even helped plan the funeral.

Myers worked with Miller’s 88-year-old father, a prominent lawyer in town who’d been living in his own home, still driving his car, and even going into the office on a weekly basis. Everyone in his life thought everything was fine.

It wasn’t until Miller was in town visiting her father that she realized that things just weren’t right. From bills going unpaid to the house being in disarray, Miller says, she and her brothers knew they needed to find some assistance for their “fiercely independent” father.

“I called Encompass, and Suzanne returned my call that night.”

With a background in social work and experience working with seniors in hospital settings, Myers says that she has witnessed her fair share of seniors being “railroaded” into a bad situation. “I just saw a lot of people giving the wrong information, and I broke out of that.” Three years ago, she opened Encompass Senior Solutions with the focus of giving her clients the whole picture of options available to them, rather than a limited view that may be benefiting someone else’s agenda.

“[I wanted to] make things right for seniors, give them a choice, because some people don’t give them the whole truth,” says Myers. “And, lo and behold, if you give people all the information, they make really good decisions.”

Myers explains that at Encompass, she gives her clients comprehensive assessment, helping them to evaluate the situation that they are currently in and what options will best serve their needs in the future.

“Ultimately, what people want to know is if they can remain in their home and how they can make staying at home a safe option for them.” – Suzanne Myers, Encompass Senior Solutions

Along with an RN, Myers meets with everyone involved in the senior’s care, as well as the senior if they are able. “My preference is for everyone that loves and cares for the person to be available.” Of course, this is not always possible, and Myers understands that. She is very adept at working with out-of-town relatives and considering the feedback and concerns of all those involved.

The Encompass team looks at the medical and psychological history of the senior, their finances, their power of attorney, and living wills. They consider the environment they are currently living in and if the senior can continue living on their own.

“Ultimately, what people want to know is if they can remain in their home and how they can make staying at home a safe option for them.” Things as simple as rugs, stairs, and placement of furniture are assessed, as well as more involved concerns, such as medications, hoarding, substance abuse, and dementia. “No question is too small or too big,” says Myers.

As to what triggers to look for or when is the right time to consider seeking assistance, Myers says the right time is anytime there is a concern. “There’s not necessarily a crisis, but you feel that something’s not right.” It could be weight loss, poor hygiene, lapses in memory, or any number of issues.

Encompass offers full assessments and targeted assessments. “In a targeted assessment, a decision has been made to move somewhere, and we can be brought in to make the best decision regarding that move,” she says.

Changes, no matter how big or how small, can be difficult for seniors and their families to accept. But Myers says that it’s often the family members that are the most apprehensive to address the issues. She says that most seniors being assessed, when confronted with the concerns, realize that there is a problem. “Fifteen to 20 minutes into the assessment, they figure out, ‘Wait a minute…she’s on my side. She’s not trying to pack me up and send me somewhere.’”

She says that often, the senior is able to stay in their own home, even those with memory issues. Myers and her staff make recommendations on what will be best for the senior, both in near and distant future. Rehab may be a necessary as a short-term solution, but they may be able to return to their home at a later time. Myers says she works with all scenarios and with all timeframes.

After years in the field, she has a wide network of resources allowing her to cover all the bases for her clients. From personal drivers, cooks, and housekeepers, to physicians and living communities, she will contact the right people for the specific situation. “We’ve done a lot of creative things for people to allow them to stay in their home.”

“[Suzanne] understood both sides of [my dad]…that he had dementia and was still a person. She made it the best it could possibly be.” – Melanie Miller

Such was the case with Miller’s father, who was able to stay in his own home but had to relinquish his car keys when Myers presented the situation to him. “Dad was able to accept from her what might have been very difficult to accept from his kids,” says Miller.

Miller appreciated the fact that Myers saw her father as a whole person, not simply as someone with dementia that could be difficult at times. “She understood both sides of him…that he had dementia and was still a person. She made it the best it could possibly be.”

Darold Jordan is another client of Myers’ who has been working with her for several years. Referred to Myers by a friend, Jordan hired Encompass to assist him and his wife when they needed some extra help around the house. “They’re flexible…they’ll do as much or as little as needed.” Jordan explains that Myers would spend four hours a day with his wife, helping her with her needs and tidying up around the house.

“[Encompass has] been very satisfactory and they have fulfilled our needs for a couple of years now,” he says. “They have several phases of assistance, which makes it adequate for most people’s needs.”

When Jordan’s wife died in June, Myers continued to help him with sorting through his home. He is currently in the process of downsizing and moving into an independent living community in the near future. The assistance that Encompass and Myers brought to Jordan and his late wife made a world of difference for which he is extremely grateful. “We actually got to stay in our own home,” he adds, obviously pleased.