Tag Archives: beauty

Fashion: A Sophisticated Tune-Up

July 22, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Model Joanna Kingsbury of Omaha shows off beautiful summer styles from Gramercy in Countryside Village, Garment District in The Shops of Legacy, and The Mix in Countryside Village. Hair by Kali Rahder of Sirens at the Loft. Makeup by Chevy Kozisek of Sirens at the Loft. Special thanks to Ben McDonnell for providing the Honda S2000.


Photo 1: Corey “Cara” Shift Dress ($182) and NYC Jewelry Bracelets ($30-38) and Earrings ($38) from Gramercy, 8711 Countryside Plz. 
Stuart Weitzman “Glossy” Pump ($435) from The Mix, 11740 Stonegate Cir.

Photo 2: Rory Beca Roller Top ($136) and James Jeans “Twiggy” Jeans ($160) from Garment District, 16939 Wright Plz. #123. Sam Edelman “Opal” Heel ($125) from The Mix, 11740 Stonegate Cir

Photo 3: Parker “Lila Dress” ($238), Belgo Lux Ladies Belt ($25), and NYC Jewelry Chain Link Necklace ($38) from Gramercy, 8711 Countryside Plz.

Body Image

June 20, 2013 by

Q: My teenage daughter is trying to diet because all of her friends are on diets. I’m worried she’s developing an unhealthy attitude about her body, as well as food, and I don’t want her to starve herself. How can I discuss my worry with her and get her to think more positively about her body?

A: Your relationship with your daughter will affect your approach. When you have a good opportunity, try mentioning to your daughter that you’ve noticed several of her friends are dieting. Ask her what she thinks or how she feels about it and give her time to answer. If she mentions feeling bad about her body, try asking how long she’s been feeling that way or if she can tell you about when it started. Pay attention, be interested in her responses, and stay neutral. If your daughter feels like you’re judging her or her friends, her defensiveness could lead to an argument, or she’ll simply be done talking.

Depending on the situation, some of the following ideas may be applicable:

  • If your family meals or eating habits really could use a makeover, approach it as an entire family without singling out your daughter.
  • Work on body image together with your daughter, keeping each other accountable regarding negative body image statements.
  • Write a note for your daughter sharing what you’re feeling. Be positive in the words you choose and let her read it on her own time.
  • Affirm your daughter’s strengths and her beauty. Be specific so she knows you’re sincere.
  • Avoid putting value on food. It isn’t good or bad; it’s just food. And she’s not good or bad based on what she eats.
  • Finally, what is YOUR attitude toward food and your body? Don’t underestimate the influence you have on your daughter. Think about how your answers to the following questions affect your daughter’s self-image, as well as your own:
  • Do you think and speak positively about your body?
  • Are you critical of other women’s appearance or of what/how much they eat?
  • When you receive a compliment regarding something appearance-related, do you disagree, and then start pointing out other things you don’t like about yourself?
  • Do you make negative comments about a body feature you share with your daughter? You may realize that this is a great time to work on your self-image as well.

Deb Fuller is a mental health therapist with Real Life Counseling in Omaha.

Tan Without Damaging Your Skin

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

When Coco Chanel returned from a luxurious vacation in 1929, she declared “The 1929 girl must be tanned,” starting a beauty revolution that changed the sun-kissed look from being a sign of working-class status to chic, wealthy fashionista. Surprisingly, this trend has stuck around for nearly 85 years and has only grown as a desired beauty trait among women (not to mention its growth as a major cash-cow for the beauty industry).

The problem is more and more women are getting skin cancer while trying to achieve this look, even those in their early 20s who should barely have had time to damage their skin. With too much natural sun exposure, as well as tanning booth UV exposure, this beautiful look seems a little too dangerous. But as it’s the time of year again for swimsuits, women are lining up to get that perfect tan.

So how can we get the bronzed look without actually harming our skin?

If you’re attempting your own self-tanning experience, try Here Comes the Sun™ ($28), one of the many Philosophy skin care products available at Sephora in Village Pointe Shopping Center. According to Sephora’s website, “This self-tanner provides a sun-inspired golden glow within hours of application while an amino acid complex helps firm and tone for smooth, healthy-looking skin. The oil-free, streak-free formula is easy to apply for even, mistake-proof coverage. Skip the sun, and go for the glow.”

Cheaper options—like Jergens Natural Glow, L’Oreal Sublime Bronze, or Sally Hansen Airbrush Leg—usually range from $7-15 and are available at Walgreens, Target, or Walmart. But always read the product reviews first! While these products will save you money, they can sometimes spread unevenly or leave your hands, arms, knees, ankles, and feet looking too brown or awkwardly orange. A few minutes of online reading can be the difference between countless hours of frustrated scrubbing in the shower and a thrifty, beautiful glow.

If you don’t trust your own handiwork to get the desired effect, most local tanning salons have spray-on tanning available. Best of Omaha® winner Ashley Lynn’s Tanning, which has 11 locations in Omaha, is known for its “sunless tan” spray-on tanning.

A “sunless tan” at Ashley Lynn’s only takes a few minutes. Clients can go fully nude or wear swimsuits. Single sessions cost $30, but the tanning salon currently has a $39 special for three sessions.

“We use the VersaSpa spray tan booth,” says Dana Morinelli, director of marketing with Ashley Lynn’s. “There’s a clear treatment and a bronzer treatment. The bronzer is topical. [It] washes off so you can see it right away. Both are composed of skin-firming agents to give you long-lasting color.” Morinelli adds that the color in the clear treatment develops four to eight hours after the session, and both treatments usually last about five to seven days, depending on skin type and daily skin care routines.

Though the bronzer treatment isn’t recommended if you’re getting a quick spray-on tan during your lunch break before heading back to the office, Morinelli assures that the treatments are water-soluble, so clothes won’t be stained.

“If you’re looking for quick color with fewer sessions, then [sunless tan] is perfect. It’s completely cosmetic, and it gives you that immediate tan,” says Morinelli.

Fashion: Roomies

April 25, 2013 by
Photography by Christian Behr

We’ve all lived with a roommate or two who was a little less than ideal. That one was high-maintenance, this one was a slob, and that one was just plain loud. But sometimes to chase after what we want—a new job downtown, a presence in the music scene, a competitive arts fellowship—we have to live with some setbacks. For now. At least we can look fabulous doing it.

Models Sidney, Carey, and Mariah of Sasha Models wear fashions provided by Nouvelle Eve, Souq, Ltd., and The Flying Worm. Hair & Makeup by Cassie Broniecki with Bungalow/8. Thanks to Ally Behr and jLofts on the Market.


Photo 1: Watercolor Dress ($90) and Gold Chain-Mail Necklace ($38). Nouvelle Eve, 1102 Howard St. – nouvelleeve.com
Photo 2: Denim Jacket ($68), Gray Tank ($46), Denim Shorts ($89), Leather Band ($115), Bridle Belt ($99), and Bullet Necklace ($18). Nouvelle Eve, 1102 Howard St. – nouvelleeve.com. Tights from Flying Worm, 1125 Jackson St. – omahavintage.com
Photo 3: Floral Hi-Lo Hem Dress ($98) and Owl Necklace ($18). Nouvelle Eve, 1102 Howard St. – nouvelleeve.com. Peace Wrist Corsage ($175) by Michelle Zacharia with Souq, Ltd., 1018 Howard St. – souqltd.com

Rebecca Forsyth

March 25, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

“I think I always wanted to be a hairdresser,” says Rebecca Forsyth, 26.

With a mother as a receptionist in a hair salon, it’s no wonder that Forsyth aspired to work in a salon, as she spent a good deal of her childhood in one. As Forsyth got older, she veered from the cosmetology path and attended a traditional, four-year college. “At the end of it all, having cut all of my friends’ hair in my kitchen since high school, I realized hair was still where my heart was.”

Forsyth moved to Omaha about five years ago from Sioux Falls, S.D., to attend cosmetology school at Capitol School of Hairstyling and is currently a stylist at Bungalow/8 off 105th and Pacific Street. “It’s a fabulous and beautiful space, and I couldn’t dream of a better fit,” she says of the salon. “Everyone working there is so inspired and passionate.”

Hair color is Forsyth’s specialty. She’s an American Board Certified Haircolorist, an honor only attained by 1,700 stylists in the U.S. But she also has interests in styling. “I collaborate with a lot of photographers, fashion designers, and other creative types locally in both photo and video work, so I’m constantly working to help others realize their vision.” In addition to her hair coloring and styling credits, Forsyth has also developed a number of hairstyling tutorials with Sarah Lorsung Tvrdik, co-founder of Hello Holiday, an Omaha womens wear ecomerce site. The tutorials have been seen in magazines, reblogged, and pinned thousands of times on Tumblr and Pinterest.

“I haven’t worn pants in like seven years. I’m very into femininity but certainly a bit country and a bit rock and roll.”

From braids to blowouts to beehives, Forsyth says she loves it all. “My love of styling has really helped me to find ways to work on teaching my clients while they’re in my chair how to style their own hair at home. Before I was a hairdresser, I was always so frustrated that my hair would look great when I’d leave the salon, but I would be clueless about what to do with it when I was at home in front of the bathroom mirror. I’ve made it my mission to try to bridge that gap.”

Her clientele is very diverse, ranging from men and women, young and old. She also sees many clients with long hair and red hair. “I was a redhead myself for many years, which is likely where my eye for red comes from.”

As for her personal style, Forsyth describes her look as “a mixture of Brigitte Bardot, a Bradley doll, Dolly Parton, and a 1960s airline stewardess.” She explains that she’s very influenced by the late ‘60s big hair, lipstick, and winged eyeliner. “I haven’t worn pants in like seven years. I’m very into femininity but certainly a bit country and a bit rock and roll. You are as likely to find me in cowboy boots or a square dancing dress as you are to find me in a fabulous jumper and pair of heeled Mary Janes.”

Her favorite styling products and tools include:

  • Mason Pearson Popular Mixture hairbrushes—“It’s the Rolls Royce of brushes and has helped me produce amazing styling results.”
  • Kerastase’s Ciment Thermique—“Many of my blonde clients will tell you I’m also a huge fan. [It’s] a product that protects from heat and helps to rebuild broken and damaged hair. I’ve seen incredible results with it.”
  • Bumble and bumble Spray de Mode—“It holds fabulously and provides great texture and body but is still dry and brushable, which is great for re-styling and avoiding that 1980s shellac-ed look.”

Here Comes the Bride

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Just as April marks the arrival of springtime, so, too, does it signal the beginning of wedding season—typically viewed as mid-April through mid-October—and the onset of “wedding fever” for many excited soon-to-be and wanna-be brides.

Regardless of whether your nuptials are a year away or far off in the distance, wedding season is a great time to attend Omaha bridal fairs and visit bridal boutiques, floral shops, and other wedding businesses in the metro and start making a list of all your must-haves for your special day. After all, creating your dream wedding takes time and planning—why not get started now?

To celebrate wedding season, we’re spotlighting three metro businesses that provide distinctive products and services for Omaha brides: gown boutique, Rhylan Lang; accessories vendor, Inez Gill; and floral service, Flowers for Special Occasions. All three are owned by local, young women who are not only on top of national trends, but in fact are leading the way in the Midwest with unique, high-end wedding fashions and accessories.

Rhylan Lang

The goal of upscale bridal boutique, Rhylan Lang, is simple—to make sure that each bride leaves with a dress that is as amazing as the memories created. “Every dress in the store is made from silk fabrics,” says owner Tracy Ponec, 29, of her unique collection. “If there is beading, it is Swarovski. If there is lace, it has intricate details. I want brides to be able to tell the difference in quality.”

Ponec, who has a joint degree in textiles and journalism from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has been working in the wedding gown industry for nine years. “In college, I [did] bridal alterations,” she says. “I never thought I was going to make a career out of it.”

After graduating, she moved to Kansas City. “I had done a few internships that were more in-line with fashion-related public relations, but there wasn’t a lot of opportunity for that in the Midwest.” But with years of bridal alterations experience on her résumé, she took a shot and applied to the highest-end bridal salon in Kansas City, even though they weren’t hiring. Of course, she got hired. She even had the opportunity to do some professional training in New York with bridal design teams for Vera Wang and Reem Acra. “The owner [of the salon] and I made a great team. I learned so much from him. A few months in, he told me he thought I was born to do this.”20130227_bs_7349 copy

When Ponec returned to Nebraska, she saw the bridal market with new eyes. “Knowing how many of my brides in Kansas City were from Omaha, it was pretty obvious there was something missing for these brides in the Nebraska market.” She worked a bridal position for a short time but then decided it was time to bring her vision to life. A few years later with a business plan in hand, Ponec opened Rhylan Lang.

The name “Rhylan Lang” is actually a play on Ponec’s maiden name, Rhylander. “There is part of me in the name, but [the brand] isn’t about me. It’s about the brides,” she says. Because she cares about her brides, Ponec wanted her gown collection—which starts at a range of $1,600 to $6,000—to be exclusive in the state. From there, it was important to that the dresses were the highest quality fabrics and finishes available at each price point.

“During an appointment, a professional stylist will help select gowns from our inventory based on what a bride is looking for and their budget. The experience here is more intimate and far less chaotic than brides are used to. It’s a pleasant change for those that have been shopping a lot.”

For more information, visit rhylanlang.com or call 402-933-3510.

Inez Gill

Courtney Zurcher, 24, got the itch to start her own accessories business after making scarves for her family and friends. Today, she is the owner and designer at her accessories business, Inez Gill. Since starting Inez Gill, Zurcher’s accessories have been featured in Omaha’s Wedding Essentials and on Daily Candy, an e-mail newsletter and website devoted to what’s new and hot. She’s even designing accessories for the Daily Candy editor’s wedding.

“Inez Gill actually came from a combination of family names,” she explains of her business’ name. “My grandfather’s mom, Inez, was the kind of woman who just painted everything. She even painted the fridge once. She was very eccentric. Gill was my grandmother’s last name. She was a traditional mom and did needlework to make clothing.” Zurcher likes the combination of Inez and Gill because “one was artsy and one was practical,” which is how she’d like to approach her business.

When it comes to weddings, more brides are willing to pay for high-end products that are unique. That’s where Inez Gill accessories come in. “Accessories have a lot of life because you can put it on and it will change an outfit completely,” says Zurcher, who recently displayed her work at Omaha Fashion Week. Most of Zurcher’s bridal accessories are for the brides who want really fun, colorful looks. “I want [my pieces] to feel like accessories from a 1920s hat shop down the street—things that tailors and seamstresses would custom-make.”20130227_bs_7349 copy

While most designers and bridal vendors ship in their accessories, Zurcher creates and designs each piece. “Some designers draw sketches, but I just think of what I have, and then I put it together. I do have to put a lot more thought into how I design an accessory though because I take so many different pieces and put them together. I have my own system, and I don’t buy anything pre-made, unless it’s like a vintage leaf or something.”

With suppliers coming from everywhere (even some out of England), Zurcher has a lot of unique pieces to work with in creating each accessory. Natural stemming, vintage leaves, rhinestones—she finds all kinds of items from her suppliers and antique shops. “I don’t really follow a particular style,” she says of her mix-and-match work.

But just because Zurcher makes her accessories by hand doesn’t mean they look handmade. In fact, she prefers to spend more time making each accessory have a high-end look, even if it takes her more than the usual three to five hours. “I just like making things that make people feel good.”

For more information, visit inezgill.com.

Flowers for Special Occasions

“We have a strong passion for floral design,” says Jessica Pitt, 29, owner and designer at Flowers for Special Occasions. “We are always reinventing our work to stay fresh and in touch with the ever-changing fashion of the [wedding] industry.”

Although Pitt studied Fine Arts at College of Saint Mary and Behavioral Sciences at Bellevue University, she says that the floral business is in her blood. With four generations of her family having been involved in florals, it was only natural for Pitt to take up the business. “I grew up in my mother’s flower shop, spending afternoons as a child playing in the shop and eventually working there from the time I was 15 through college.”

A customer actually gave the business its name. “We were trying to establish ourselves as a vendor who worked exclusively with weddings and other special events. The name just sort of stuck,” Pitt says. But the business is also known as the Flower Design Studio, which Pitt explains comes from their days as a co-op with two other businesses.20130227_bs_7197 copy

Pitt says Flowers for Special Occasions is unique because they custom-make floral arrangements. “None of our work is based on cookie-cutter bouquets,” she adds. “We work with the client to develop a special feel for the event, and we create our pieces based on our collaborations.” Budgets of all sizes are welcomed by the Flowers for Special Occasions team. It doesn’t matter if a couple is working on a small or large budget—Pitt says the floral arrangements will look beautiful.

“We have built a very loyal following through the years. We work primarily through word of mouth. I believe [that] our happy clients and their referrals are what has built and sustained our company, making it the success it is today.

“Since we are a family business, we all have a personal stake in wanting our business to succeed. We never cut corners,” she says. “We have one chance to get it right, so we always strive to give each wedding something very special.”

For more information, visit flowersforspecialoccasions.webs.com or call 402-891-1602.

Quit Aging Yourself

Every year, we spend tons of money to keep our faces looking youthful and tight. But what we don’t realize is that some of our bad beauty habits are actually making us look older than we are. Here are some seemingly “no-brainer” tips that will help you keep your face looking young and beautiful without spending a fortune on anti-aging products:

Find the Right Foundation.

Every woman has been guilty of those embarrassing foundation lines at some point in her life. What you might not know is that the appearance of those lines is usually a signal that you’re not using the right kind or color of foundation. Even worse, using the wrong foundation can speed up the process of aging of your skin. The best way to prevent both of these problems is to find the best foundation for your skin.

Before you even think about brands, you need to determine what kind of foundation works best with your skin type. Have dry skin? Look for “moisturizing” or “hydrating” foundations. Have oily skin? Look for “oil-free” or “matte” foundations. Have a combination of oily and dry skin? Look for “cream-to-powder” foundations. Or if that seems like too much of a hassle, look for mineral foundations, which go great with any skin type—especially sensitive skin.

After determining the right kind of foundation, you need to match the color to your skin tone. Despite what you might have heard about testing the color on your wrist, the best place to test a foundation color is actually on your jawline, as this is the area where foundation is most noticeable (Remember those lines?). Make sure you’re as close to natural light as possible—like outside or near a window—while testing colors since indoor lighting can make you choose to dark of a color. Whichever color blends or disappears into your skin tone during the test is the color you should get.

Don’t Overpluck Your Brows.

Some women prefer professional eyebrow threading or waxing. But for those of us that prefer to save cash and time, plucking is the way to go. The only problem with plucking is that, too often, we overpluck our brows, giving us an aged look. Actually, the fuller the brow, the more youthful you look. Now, “fuller” doesn’t mean you let your eyebrows go ungroomed—just don’t pluck them too thin.

Before plucking, wash your face, brush your brows up and out with a brow brush (a clean toothbrush works, too), and sit near a window with a good mirror. To determine your brow thickness, use an eye pencil and draw a line along the bottom edge of your brow, following the fullest, natural shape. Any hairs that fall below this line are okay to pluck. The general rule with plucking is to make sure your brow begins in line with the inner corner of your eye and ends in line diagonally with the bottom edge of your nose and the outer corner of your eye. You can use a ruler (or your tweezers, if they’re long enough) to check if everything is aligned. Any hairs outside of these measurements can be removed.

If your brows are naturally too-thin, or if you’ve overplucked and are trying to grow your brows back out, use powder or an eyebrow pencil to fill in the shape. Just make sure to match the powder or eyebrow pencil shade to your natural hair color so you don’t age yourself any further—or look like a cartoon villain.

Remove Makeup and Wash Your Face.

It’s hard to get in the habit of removing our makeup and washing our faces every night when we’re tired and just want to get in bed. But not removing your makeup or washing your face is one of the quickest ways to age your skin. Just think about the fact that the average woman today begins wearing makeup at age 12 and wears makeup into her 70s and 80s. That’s long-term damage.

If you don’t use all-natural makeup, there are tons of harsh chemicals in your makeup that can damage your skin. Not to mention your skin is exposed to dirt, pollution, and germs throughout the day. Imagine all of those things collecting on your pillows as you sleep. If you think that’s gross, then why are you leaving those things on your face? At night, the skin needs oxygen to repair the damage done throughout the day. With your pores clogged, your skin can’t go through its natural exfoliation.

Also, our eyes start showing age the earliest because the skin around them is the thinnest. Going to bed with your makeup on dries the skin around your eyes out and weakens the hairs in your eyebrows and eyelashes, causing them to thin and fall out. Remember—it’s a lot easier to remove your makeup and wash your face than it is to undo aging and regrow your eyebrows and eyelashes.

There Are NO Fashion Rules!

February 25, 2013 by
Photography by Jim Scholz

I can’t tell you how many times people come to me with a question regarding whether or not they can wear a certain, usually trendy style of a jacket, pant, skirt, top, etc. My reply is always, “It depends on what you wear it with.”

Too many people follow the trends too closely, thinking that, in order to be fashionable, they have to wear what they see, as they see it. Fashion is a lot more forgiving than most people think. It’s more general than specific, more enabling than disabling. It’s “change” that you are in “charge” of! There are no fashion rules, just styling relationships to pay attention to.

When it comes to color, some people still believe there are only certain colors they can wear. The only colors that matter are the ones next to your face. I happen to look horrible in almost every shade of pink, but if I wear a shirt or a scarf in a flattering color under a pink sweater, pink works for me! I don’t look good in beiges either, but if I stack silver necklaces and wear silver earrings with beige, it goes from terrible to terrific on me. So if you’re worried that you won’t look good in emerald, the color of 2013, play with what you pair it with or limit emerald to your skirts and pants.

If you care about looking your best, your shape and the shapes of clothes you wear need to be compatible. Short women often tell me that they cannot wear long jackets. They usually determine that when trying them on over pants and skirts of a different color, which usually does make a short person look top-heavy and shorter. However, if you are short, the right long jackets can and will work over matching bottoms.

When it comes to skirts, the length makes a big difference. Length is always individual, and it varies according to what it’s worn with. Women with heavy lower legs usually look better in pants, but in fall and winter, they can wear dark tights and boots, and be confident about looking great in almost any skirt! In summer, ankle-length skirts with flat sandals are best.

The cut of your pants and jeans is very important. Never buy a pair of pants without examining how they look in back from a three-way mirror! Whether you can wear a wide leg, a tight leg, or a flared one depends more on what you wear it with than on the shape of you.

The shapes of what we wear shape us! I have proof of that. In 1991, when I was the Ak-Sar-Ben Coronation designer for the first time, the fashion look focused on waistlines. Pants, skirts, and dresses were wide-banded and belted at the waist. Almost all of the princesses and countesses had small waistlines. In 1997, when I did the ball again, fashion hadn’t changed enough to make much of a difference in body shapes. By 2002, when jeans were worn at the hip and below, girls had lost the definition of a waistline. Even thin and tiny girls had waist measurements considerably larger than those of girls their size in 1991. My relationship advice based on that is “beware of the comfort zone.” Clothes that are too comfortable are dangerous not only after a person is 60, but always!

I welcome your feedback and invite you to send questions to sixtyplus@omahapublications.com.

Mary Anne Vaccaro lives in Omaha. She designed and made couture clothing for an international clientele of professionals and socialites of all ages. She created ready-to-wear collections that were sold from her New York showroom, and she designed for the bridal industry. She designed for three Ak-Sar-Ben Coronation Balls and ran a fashion advertising business in five states for a number of years. Invisible Apron® is one of several products that she has designed and developed. She still designs for select clients and works as an image consultant, stylist, personal shopper, and speaker on the subjects of fashion, art, and style. For more information, visit maryannevaccaro.com or call 402-398-1234.

 

Mattie Knihal

January 25, 2013 by

Mattie Knihal, 30, says she always loved to play with hair when she was little. “I’ve known since I was 7 years old that I would do hair,” she says. “Whenever anyone came over to our house, they would get a ‘Mattie Hair-Do.’”

Knihal, the oldest of three children, was born and raised in Omaha. She graduated from Millard North High School in 2001 and immediately went to Capitol School of Hairstyling, from which she graduated in 2002. Shortly thereafter, she started with Gloss Salon & Day Spa where she has been for ten years.

During her time as a stylist, Knihal has become a Redken Certified Colorist, which means she has been recognized for her expertise and commitment in Redken hair color and hair care products. She has also been recognized in both the 2012 and 2013 Best of Omaha™ contests in the Hair Colorist category.

“I want clients to look at me and think, ‘She cares about her appearance, and I want her to make me look good.’”

She believes her clientele—which includes KETV’s Brandi Petersen—keep her on her toes. “[They] all like to look and feel their best when they leave my chair,” she says. “Some like to change up what we do every time to keep it new and exciting. Some like to stay with what works best for them.” She adds that she prefers to be upfront with her clientele and tell them what will and won’t work for them based on their face shape, lifestyle, and time they want to spend on their hair.

Knihal, who has two daughters, Emma and Elaina, with husband Ryan, describes her own personal style as clean and professional. “I want clients to look at me and think, ‘She cares about her appearance, and I want her to make me look good’…I’m simple in the fact that I think black is the best color. It goes with anything and looks great when paired with the right accessories.”

Her favorite styling products and tools include:

  • Redken’s Color Extend Shampoo and Conditioner—“The shampoo provides color retention and anti-fade protection while maximizing color vibrancy and strength. The conditioner allows for great detangling and smooth conditioning without weighing the hair down.”
  • Redken’s Guts 10 Volume Spray—“It lifts up the roots of your hair to provide all-over volume. It allows for a lasting flexible feel and look.”
  • Redken’s Align 12 Protective Strengthening Lotion—“It has anti-frizz technology and heat protection. It allows for a naturally straight look.”