Tag Archives: Alvine Engineering

Urban Evolution

January 8, 2019 by
Photography by William Hess Photography

Steve and Julie Burgess were enjoying a glass of wine at La Buvette when the idea hit Julie like a ton of old bricks. While admiring the Old Market’s lovely brick buildings, redesigned from warehouses into homes, and imagining the minimalist ease of urban living, it occurred to Julie that she and Steve had access to a beautiful, old, downtown building that they could renovate into their own modern living space.

Automatic Printing Co. has been in Julie’s family for generations, housed in three adjacent buildings at 17th and Cuming streets. In early 2017, Julie, who works at Automatic, and Steve, who does commercial architecture for DLR Group, began the process of redesigning the easternmost building into what is now their happy home. 

“I’m grateful because I just knew it was possible, but I couldn’t see what it would look like,” Julie says. “Steve has that knack; he works with spaces and can see it without it being there.”

Serendipitously, Automatic Printing Co. was looking to downsize its space just as the Burgesses were. The Burgesses, along with Julie’s sister Jana, had lived together in a sprawling Dundee home for 16 years. Despite their substantial investment of time and money in renovating that home, the 6,000-square-foot house situated on three-quarters of an acre ultimately took too much effort to care for and was not ideal for Jana, a traumatic brain injury survivor with mobility issues. 

In April 2017, the family moved from their house on Happy Hollow Boulevard to the Tip Top Apartments, where they would remain during a 15-month detour between homes before moving into their new space on Cuming Street in July 2018. 

The Burgesses partnered with Geoff DeOld and Emily Andersen of DeOld Andersen Architecture to create the new home of their dreams in the old family building. Julie says they were blessed to find DeOld and Andersen due to their experience working with older buildings and willingness to design for the Burgesses’ lifestyle and logistical needs.

“Emily and Geoff visited us at our old house to see how we lived,” Julie says. “They really listened and observed how Jana moved around, how we used our space, and the things that mattered to us.”

Steve came to the conversation with his architectural mindset and relevant examples for reference.

“I combed through images of many historic building renovation projects and collected a handful of pictures to show them the direction we wanted to go,” Steve says.

For DeOld and Andersen, working with Steve and Julie was a dream.

“Steve and Julie were really great to work with—seriously the best clients we’ve ever had,” Andersen says. “There’s a certain language we [and Steve] share as architects and Julie is extremely open-minded. It made the project better and smoother.”

Andersen says they started by using components they knew to be most important to the family—bringing natural light into a space with scant existing windows, accessibility for Jana and the Burgesses as they age, outdoor spaces, and a proper kitchen for Steve, who loves to cook—as anchors for the design plan.

A singular front patio gate inspired by Lebanese design and strategic skylights brought in light; an elevator and second-floor laundry facilities gave Jana the gift of independence; a rooftop patio ably mimics their old Dundee terrace, and the kitchen is spacious and well-appointed enough to satisfy any chef. 

There were also happy discoveries along the way that ultimately informed aesthetics. For example, the Burgesses intended to put in new flooring until a gorgeous Douglas fir wood floor was found under layers of history and alternate flooring. 

“The wood floor informed a lot of the other decisions—the paneling on the wall, the bookshelves, the butcher’s block in the kitchen—all the wood touches started to come out after that,” Steve says. “The texture and history of this place is wonderful.”

“To me, this project was largely about just revealing the existing building, but then also the insertion of the new structural steel frame. It was actually very simple in some regards but complex to execute,” Andersen says, noting that the project’s success depended heavily on a robust team of partners, including contractor Dicon; structural and civil engineers with The Wells Resource; and mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineers from Alvine Engineering.

Andersen says the project is an example of adaptive reuse—adapting an existing building to a new use—which she notes is key to creating intriguing urban landscapes.

“These can become really cool projects because there’s this existing building with its own history and this overlap of uses,” Andersen says. “There are constraints with that but also the ability to be very creative and develop way more interesting environments—where you have a collection of different types and styles of structures, which ultimately leads to a way more interesting neighborhood and city.”

While their home is on such hallowed, familiar family ground, neither Steve nor Julie had ever lived in new construction until now.

“It’s interesting. In a 100-year-old building, we’re living in new construction,” Julie says with a laugh.

“It’s really a joy to live in a space that you helped design,” Steve says. “You have the opportunity to think through the layout, the circulation, the proximity and adjacencies of spaces…It’s a nice feeling and there’s a real sense of satisfaction in how well it turned out.”

After investing more than $1 million in their new home and finding it the perfect fit, Steve and Julie were disheartened to see that the Builder’s District plan—approved by the City Council in October 2018—shows their home and family business wiped off the map through the power of eminent domain.

Andersen says that result would be a shame. In addition to representing what she calls “a very old model of working within a city” that ignores the need for community engagement and transparency, Andersen believes the demolition of old buildings like this is not ideal for Omaha’s architectural landscape nor its ability to retain talent and combat “brain drain.”

“We need to be thinking creatively about our existing buildings instead of just demolishing them,” she says. “Having urban neighborhoods with a collection of different conditions or types of buildings lends itself to a richer experience than areas that are completely monoculture of the similar scale and generic design. To me, they should be thinking about how they can integrate Automatic Printing and some of the other perfectly OK structures in the area into the current plan, because it would result in a more interesting development.”

In the meantime, as the Burgesses hope to be able to keep their new home in the old family building, they’re enjoying the neighborhood and basking in the memories of years spent in their special space.

“Not only is it beautiful and functional, but I sit in the living room at night and just marvel because I can see the shadows of what used to be here,” Julie says. “I look around and know that, about where Jana’s chair is, that’s where our dad’s desk sat for all those years. I think my dad might say we were crazy to do it, but he would also get it and think it was a pretty neat progression.”


Learn more about the Burgess residence at d-aarch.com/cuming-street-residence.

This article was printed in the January/February 2019 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Alvine Engineering

May 15, 2018 by

This sponsored content was printed in the June/July 2018 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/bb0718_flipbook/26

When designing their new corporate headquarters, Alvine Engineering sought to develop a modern office environment capable of displaying all the innovation their engineers routinely design into buildings while enhancing their productivity. The building provides an exceptional work environment for Alvine Engineering’s mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, and architectural lighting engineers, and for the employees at the firm’s technology division, IP Design Group, which focuses on telecommunications, audiovisual, security, and acoustic consulting, and design.

The 130-person firm serves a diverse clientele locally, regionally, and nationally from its offices in Omaha, Lincoln, Des Moines, and Oklahoma City.

From the onset, the goal was to develop a space that embodies the innovation Alvine Engineering and IP Design Group feel every building deserves—always considering the building systems and the way they are integrated into, and interact with, the architectural design.

There are many elements representing the building’s innovative design.

Open, flexible work environment—An open, flexible work environment featuring individual work areas, collaboration spaces, and community gathering spaces.

Transparent view into mechanical and technology rooms—A view of the mechanical equipment required to optimize occupant comfort and the color-coded technology infrastructure that each traverse the under floor system offer an immediate glimpse of the coordination of complex systems within the space. The under-floor plenum features individual occupant temperature control of each
work environment.

Architectural lighting—Unique LED lighting concepts throughout demonstrate design creativity, enhance occupant wayfinding, promote system control to conserve energy, limit glare, and reduce eye fatigue of occupants. A dedicated lighting lab allows experimentation with lighting concepts and new products. Accent fixtures along the interior building perimeter create visual interest for passersby in the evolving north downtown Capitol District.

Sustainable material and equipment selection—Selection of low-VOC building materials, activated carbon filtration on air handling units, an outdoor green roof, countertops made of recycled glass, and a dishwasher capable of recovering energy from steam for future cycles all contribute to
overall sustainability.

Technology integration—Today’s modern office environment demands thoughtful integration of technology. The telecommunications infrastructure was designed to maximize flexibility of use and ease of maintenance. Collaborative furniture, connectivity, user-friendly audiovisual systems, and an exceptional acoustical environment were part of the technology systems design. Security and access control systems resulted in a secure work environment.

WELL building certification—The future certification of Alvine offices, anticipated to be the first such space in Nebraska, is the culmination of a dedicated design effort to promote health and well-being of employees through purposeful design. Elements such as exposure to daylight, interior lighting, connection to nature, sit/stand desks, availability of WELL-compliant food for sale, and access to showers encourage a healthy and active work environment. Research has shown employee productivity, engagement, and retention is improved in WELL spaces.

The completed building demonstrates innovation occurs when all the details are considered in a carefully integrated manner—resulting in a design focused on functionality, flexibility, energy-efficiency, and operability.

1201 Cass St.
Omaha, NE 68102
402.346.7007
alvine.com
ipdesigngroup.com

Alvine Engineering

June 29, 2017 by

This sponsored content appears in the Summer 2017 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/b2b_0817_125/1?e=1413765/50121072

Alvine Engineering, a leader in the Omaha design community since 1961, offers comprehensive and innovative mechanical, electrical, and fire protection engineering, technology consulting and design, architectural lighting design, and building commissioning services. Engineering innovation is achieved through appropriate problem-solving-blending Science, Art, and Business in all aspects of our services: Science to provide the most responsive technical solutions; Art to bring innovation and apply fresh, new ideas; and Business to understand the Owner’s objectives, budget, and required return on investment.

The Alvine portfolio includes many significant projects across a local, regional, and national footprint, and the firm’s commitment to industry best practices is showcased across diverse market sectors including corporate office, healthcare, education, science and technology, data centers, hospitality, historical preservation, industrial, and military and governmental facilities.

By diversifying the firm’s services and providing an appropriate level of innovation to meet client needs now and in the future, Alvine has completed more than 750 projects in the local Omaha market in the past five years. Alvine has had the opportunity to provide design services for recognizable community partners such as Eppley Airfield, Creighton University, First National Bank, Woodmen of the World, Union Pacific, Nebraska Furniture Mart, Metropolitan Community College, Scott Technology and Data Center, Offutt Air Force Base, the University of Nebraska system, and multiple K-12 school districts.

Our ongoing commitment to Omaha is evidenced by the construction of a headquarters to serve as the corporate office for nearly 100 local design professionals. The mixed-use facility will be located on the corner of 13th and Cass.

1102 Douglas Street
Omaha, Ne 68102
402.346.7007
alvine.com

Designing and Building a Life in Omaha

June 6, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Wanted: beautiful minds.

Omaha architectural and engineering firms continue to hang the “help wanted” sign, roll out the welcome mat, and host job fairs, looking to snag that rarest of breeds: an employee who uses both sides of the brain equally, combining the practicality of a physicist and mathematician with the soul of an artist. In other words, young architects and architectural engineers are hot commodities in a leading job market.

Low interest rates and demand for new development (which shows no signs of ebbing) keep employers busy looking for qualified applicants. Where do they find the necessary numbers? Right in their own backyard.

“Certainly the job market in Omaha within architecture and engineering is very, very, very strong,” emphasizes Christopher Johnson, a vice president and managing principal at Leo A Daly, part of the big three of Omaha architecture firms, along with DLR and HDR. “Even when you look locally at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, PKI (Peter Kiewit Institute), or Nebraska-Lincoln, the interns and the graduates are secure in their employment by the holiday season, before they go home for their holiday break. That’s a lot earlier than what we would normally see.”

Top-notch schooling—the College of Architecture and the College of Engineering on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus, and the Kiewit Institute and the Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction on the university’s Omaha campus— provides Omaha firms with a locally grown crop of well-grounded, technically advanced job candidates who work well with others and possess problem-solving skills.

“In Omaha, we typically hire between 10 and 12 architects and engineers every year,” says Johnson. In addition, Leo A Daly’s internship program places about four students on the architecture/interior side and the same number on the engineering side. 

How do the salaries compare?

“Entry-level job salaries are competitive in the Omaha market because we have a very competitive spirit among all the private firms here,” Johnson says. “But when you look at the national picture, you might say they look a little lower.”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median wage for architects nationally is $76,100. Omaha’s lower numbers reflect a geographical lower cost of living.

While many graduates take their sheepskin and leave for larger salaries in larger cities like Chicago, Boston, or Dallas, an impressive percentage chooses to stay close to family and friends. Two young professionals who made a conscious decision a decade ago to stay rooted in Nebraska have seen their stars ascend on a local and national level.

Stephanie Guy, project and resource manager at Alvine Engineering in Omaha, and Andrew  Yosten, managing engineering principal and director of mechanical engineering of HDR’s architecture practice in Omaha, both found their calling early. In many ways, they mirror each other’s lives.

“My uncle owned a construction company and I enjoyed building things, but I was always pulled toward engineering,” Yosten, 34, says of his teenage years growing up in West Point, Nebraska. “I happened to stumble across a pamphlet on architectural engineering. None of the other engineering fields really appealed to me until I read that pamphlet.”

Guy comes from a place even smaller than West Point. In fact, Mullen, Nebraska, population 492, is the only town in Hooker County, nestled in the state’s beautiful Sandhills. Like Yosten, she became more interested in how a building functions than in its design.

“When I was a junior or senior in high school, I thought about architecture, but I leaned more towards the math and science rather than the creativity,” says Guy, also 34 and president-elect of the Architectural Engineering Institute. “So I thought engineering would be a natural fit.”

Guy and Yosten earned advanced degrees, two years apart, from Durham on the UNO campus, one of the few schools in the country offering a five-year program combining a bachelor’s and master’s degree in architectural engineering. Each specialized in mechanical engineering, obtaining a breadth of knowledge of a building’s structural aspects, plus its lighting, electrical, heating, cooling, and ventilation areas.

Guy opted to work for a company that focuses strictly on engineering, although she still works closely with architects. Her portfolio with Alvine includes renewable energy projects at Creighton University, renovations at Duchesne Academy in Omaha, a new school of nursing at the University of Michigan, a 50-story residential high-rise and a 50-story Class A office building, both in Chicago.

“There’s something about this Midwestern location and Midwestern work ethic that allows us to be successful,” Guy says. “We’re just a flight away from both coasts. HDR, DLR, and Leo A Daly all started here and are still here, three of the largest architectural and engineering firms in the world, with offices around the globe.”

Yosten, who interned at HDR while in school, felt at home with the company’s global reach from the get-go, especially in the field of health care.

“My mom is a physician assistant in West Point, and my wife is a nurse, so I have a true appreciation for what they do,” Yosten says. “So when I learned how much HDR’s portfolio is geared towards health care, that was a big drive for me to
stay here.”

Some of the notable health care projects Yosten’s teams have guided include the Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center in Omaha, set to open soon, and a $1.27 billion replacement for Parkland Hospital in Dallas, best known as the hospital where President John F. Kennedy died. They’re also designing a new tower for Omaha’s
Children’s Hospital.

What keeps HDR’s 952 employees in Omaha and Lincoln, Leo A Daly’s 130 local employees, over 50 architectural firms, and more than two dozen engineering firms anchored here? The ability to balance a high-powered job and a personal life in an area that avoids getting caught up in the rat race plays a huge role.

It allows Guy and her husband to raise four daughters, who range from an infant to age 9, while pursuing a career that has garnered her numerous professional awards.

It allows Yosten time to play with his 18-month-old twin boys, who he says are “really ornery and a handful” but the light of his life, along with his wife, Jill.

Development may be booming in Omaha, but sometimes the intangibles prove a greater lure for employees.

Stephanie Guy, project and resource manager at Alvine Engineering

This article was printed in the Summer 2017 edition of B2B.