Tag Archives: vacation

Take a Vacation and Create Jobs

March 23, 2018 by

When is the last time you took a vacation? I mean a real vacation, not just time off work to paint the kitchen or clean out the garage. Has it been a while since you’ve discovered a new place or experienced a new adventure you couldn’t wait to share with family and friends? If the answer is yes, you are not alone.

In Nebraska, 66 percent  of the workforce has unused vacation time. They’ve left 4.9 million vacation days on the table. Nationally, if everyone took all the vacation they’ve earned, it would generate $236 billion for our economy—enough to support 1.8 million jobs.

Think about it: if hotels had more guests, then they would need more staff. If restaurants had more diners, they would need to order more food from suppliers and hire more people. If retailers had more shoppers, they would need more merchandise to keep shelves stocked and more staff to provide great customer service. Inviting more people to visit Omaha would have the same effect in our community. You get the picture—tourism means business.

According to research from U.S. Travel, taking time off makes you a more positive and productive employee. In fact, the research shows employees who use their vacation time are more likely to get promoted and receive raises when compared to those who choose to forfeit their vacation time. Plus, and here’s the real bonus, people who take time off feel happier and enjoy improved physical health.

If you’re still not sure about taking time off, think about it this way: by taking a vacation, you’re helping create millions of jobs and providing a big boost to our nation’s economy. Now add that to your resume.

*Research provided by U.S. Travel Association’s Project Time Off, The State of the American Vacation.

Keith Backsen is executive director of the Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau.

This article was printed in the April/May 2018 edition of B2B.

On Top of the World

February 19, 2015 by
Photography by Beverly Kracher, Ph.D.

Bhima, our guide, waited for us on the trail. We caught up to her after stopping to adjust our daypacks and enjoying some wild berries. Under her umbrella, which protected her from the burning sun, we could see Bhima’s smiling face and playful eyes. She quickly evaluated our moods and stamina. She said to us, for probably the 30th time, “Not far to go before we get to the next tea house. A little bit up, a little bit down.”

Bhima was coaching us. Though it was probably another hour before we reached our stopping point, she was saying the thing we needed to hear to make it.

“A little bit up, a little bit down.” Those words have had a forceful affect on my life since returning from this year’s trek. I was in the Annapurna Range of the Himalaya Mountains in Nepal. Hikers have tried to describe the magnificence of this massive range—the raw beauty, the incredible scenery, the water buffalo, and the orange/yellow sunsets over the snowcapped mountains.

Try as we might, it is impossible. You have to go there on your own to know what Nirvana is like.

This was my second trek. The first was so powerful that I knew I had to come back with my sister. Barb and I had poured over books about the yogis and sadhus in India and Nepal when we were kids. We were inspired by their quest for spiritual enlightenment in the Himalayas. So this time I was with Barb. Her husband, Joel, came with us because he loves to explore life, too.

We hired 3Sisters Adventure Trekking Company for our trek. Three Nepalese sisters own the company and provide jobs to Nepalese women by hiring and training them as guides and porters. Walking through the majestic mountains with four Nepalese women (one guide and three porters) brought the heavens to earth. As we walked, we learned about their quest for opportunity, education, family, and freedom. I found, as I always do when I travel, that while people dress differently and have different customs, we basically desire the same things. In this, we are one race.

While trekking, Bhima showed us the way yogis and sadhus walk. The technique is two-fold. First, they take it easy. They are the tortoises not the hare. Second, they use a lower-body relaxation technique. As they hike up a mountain they rest their back leg as they push off with their front leg. Continuous movement creates stress, so relaxing the back leg, even for a second, reduces tension and increases power. In these two ways, Bhima taught us to pace ourselves and to use our legs in a way that would allow us to walk twelve hours a day.

A little bit up, a little bit down.

Since my return I have learned to pace my life just as I paced my steps up the steepest and longest trails I have ever encountered. The temptation was great to fall back into my hectic work life.

When I think about this it’s like listening to a sad song.

The beauty of the Himalayas are still with me. I can very easily feel the peace anytime I try. I know that is good for my heart. And there is one more thing. I carry a joyful, even enlightened, attitude where I see the ebb and flow of life as “a little bit up, a little bit down.”

I can be my best and do my best. And that attitude makes me feel like I’m standing on top of the world.

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Roadside Emergency Services

June 20, 2013 by

It’s July, and summertime is in full effect. This also means plenty of family road trips, most of which go off without a major hitch. However, if something does go wrong with your vehicle, it can make for a giant headache. Not to worry though, there are emergency roadside services out there that can help.

It may be well worth it to buy emergency roadside coverage in the event that you do have car trouble. Some of the services that these companies provide are:

  • Battery boosts
  • Battery replacement
  • Fuel delivery
  • Tire service
  • Towing
  • Lock-out services

The issues listed above can happen to anyone, yet are always unexpected. Prepare for the unexpected and make sure to either purchase an emergency roadside service or, at the very least, have the phone number of one such service. We are fortunate that these services are available to us, and one just might come in handy when that giant headache shows up!

Family Vacation Tips

Family vacation is a great opportunity to spend quality time together and create long-lasting memories. Get the most from your family vacation with a couple of quick tips from Boys Town Pediatrics.

Packing 

Make a list a couple of weeks before your vacation. Add to it as you remember items your family will need. Make sure to include:

  • Essential paperwork—pack plane tickets, health insurance cards, passports, and identification cards in a watertight baggie.
  • First-aid kit—include Ibuprofen, sunscreen, bug spray, prescription medications, band-aids, contact solution, antiseptic, Pepto-Bismol, sewing kit, disposable wipes, etc.
  • Back-up luggage—take precaution in case of lost luggage by packing a set of clothing, toiletries, and essentials in your carry-on.

Traveling

Discuss the travel arrangements and planned activities with your family. The anticipation of riding in an airplane or stopping to see the waterfall will keep them focused on what is to come instead of long travel times. Other travel tips include:

  • Bringing a reading or activity book or audio book.
  • Playing a game. See who can spot the most license plates from different states or bring cards for the plane ride.
  • Watching a movie. Have each child pick from a pre-selected group of movies.
  • Planning stops along the way. Sightseeing can prevent restlessness and unnecessary stopping.
  • Keeping busy during long layovers. Try to find the children’s play area or watch planes ascend and descend through the windows.

If you are traveling abroad, make sure to check the United States Embassy website for the country you are visiting. On the site, you will find information about required immunizations, travel advisories, and how to register your trip. It is also suggested to leave a copy of your passport back in the United States, so if your passport is lost, the information can be retrieved.

Meal Time

All the activities your family will do will keep everyone busy but also hungry. By pre-planning your family’s meals, you will save money and keep everyone going for the whole vacation. Fuel your family’s hunger by:

  • Carrying along pre-packed, filling snacks.
  • Bringing bottled water or a refillable drink container.
  • Planning a picnic instead of eating out every meal.
  • Picking out a few local treats to prevent too many sweets.

Making Memories

Make the most of your family vacation budget by booking tickets, excursions, and rentals in advance. Choose a few larger activities and leave room for free time, exploring, and relaxation. Consider free activities that include:

  • Hiking a trail or walking the beach.
  • Swimming at the hotel pool.
  • Bringing bikes and pedaling around town.
  • Checking out local events and activities.

Most of all, enjoy your vacation, relax, and make memories that your family will remember for a lifetime.

Discover the Magic of a Road Trip

May 25, 2013 by
Photography by Nebraska Travel & Tourism

Planning a family road trip? It’s easy to keep the kids entertained across the miles in today’s world—just load up the portable DVD player, the handheld game system, and the iPad. Perhaps you remember roughing it in the old days when you and your siblings jockeyed for space on the bench seat and played I Spy to make the time pass. Compare that to what a road trip was like 100 years ago—travel, itself, was a monumental undertaking. Not only were there no electronic games, there were no roads linking cities and towns.

In 1913, entrepreneur Carl G. Fisher vowed to change that with the construction of a paved, coast-to-coast roadway that would extend from New York City to San Francisco. The Lincoln Highway, named after our 16th president, was big news for Nebraska where the route would run the entire length of the state.

Today, you and your family can make the trek in comfort and style while visiting remnants of the old highway, including the original brick pavers near Omaha and two sections of “seedling miles” in Grand Island and Kearney.

Throughout the state, the cross-country route—now called U.S. Highway 30—is flanked by historical buildings just waiting to be explored, as well as several of Nebraska’s top attractions. For example, in Gothenburg, you can check out the reconstructed Pony Express Station; in nearby North Platte, you can visit the home of Buffalo Bill Cody at the Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park; and in Grand Island, the Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer is one of the nation’s top living history museums.

A stop in Kearney at the Great Platte River Road Archway is a must. This state-of-the-art museum traces the development of the American West, including the making of the nation’s first transcontinental highway. From there, it’s a short drive across town to see the exhibits at the Classic Car Collection, which is situated along the original route of the old Lincoln Highway.

With 400 Nebraska miles, there’s plenty to see along this historic roadway. And while the journey may be much smoother now, you can be sure it will be just as interesting and adventurous as its pre-paved days. Isn’t it time your family explored Nebraska’s Lincoln Highway?

Join the Official Lincoln Highway Centennial Celebration in Kearney June 30-July 1. With food, music, speakers, and car clubs, there will be plenty of events for the whole family. For more information, visit VisitNebraska.com/lhc.