Tag Archives: turkey

Groovy Gravy

January 12, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

UPDATE (Jan. 12, 2017) : After the publication of the January/February issue of Encounter Magazine, Cask Republic announced that it would no longer sell poutine.

“We realize that the food aspect, especially the poutine, was not financially viable,” says Ryan Frickel, co-owner of Cask Republic. Snacks will soon be available, and the bar allows patrons to bring in food from several area restaurants.

* * * * *

Foodies generally regard the 1950s as the nadir of 20th century cuisine in North America. It brought us TV dinners, jello salads, and tuna casseroles. However, it also brought us a Canadian dish that, depending on your disposition, is either a trinity of salty, starchy, fatty goodness, or a cardiologist’s dream for stirring up new business (in truth, it’s probably both).

Poutine is, essentially, french fries topped with gravy and cheese curds. Like the Reuben sandwich, there’s been a few claims to its origin, but the general consensus is that it came from rural Quebec in the late 1950s. It’s a prominent staple for restaurants downtown (Block 16) as well as Benson (1912, Benson Brewery). For the Cask Republic bar in Dundee, it’s their primary focus.

Co-owners Ryan Frickel and Craig Lundin opened Cask Republic this past summer in the former home of the popular French Bulldog restaurant. Frickel came to the decision to focus on poutine after eating it in Benson last year. Frickel says there have been poutine-focused eateries sprouting up on the West and East coasts for the past few years. Frickel wanted to be the first in Nebraska to have such an eatery.

“Who doesn’t like meat and potatoes in Nebraska?” Frickel says.

poutine1For their version of poutine, the Cask Republic double-fries their french fries to get them crispy enough to withstand the heavy coating of gravy. Their beef gravy (they also have chicken and vegetarian variations) is a combination of homemade beef stock, spices, herbs like rosemary, and some chicken. Finally, their cheese curds, served at room temperature, top the dish. When you bite into one of the curds, it should sound faintly like a dog toy.

“If it’s not squeaky, then people in the poutine world get super pissed off,” Frickel says.

Like other greasy spoon staples such as hamburgers and hash browns, there have been plenty of high-end takes on poutine. 1912 has a variation that includes duck. Block 16’s gravy incorporates a red wine reduction. The Cask Republic has poutines that include burnt ends, and even “seasonal” poutines, including turkey for the holidays. Still, focusing your menu on dish that’s basically french fries and gravy is risky. Frickel, however, compares poutine to other dishes that are now commonplace around Omaha.

“[We] kind of likened it to sushi, where 20 years ago, people in Omaha either didn’t know what sushi was or never tried it. But on the coast, it was starting to explode,” Frickel says.

Of course, if you’re going to clog your arteries with starch, cheese, and gravy, you might as well go all out and wash it down with a brew. That’s where beer comes in at Cask Republic. Frickel and minority- owner Alex Gunhus are both beer enthusiasts; they traveled to breweries throughout the United States to come up with their beer menu. Frickel says he eventually wants to build his own brewery inside the Cask Republic.

“There’s nothing like that in the Dundee area, which blows my mind,” Frickel says. “We want to be the first to do that.”

Visit facebook.com/caskrepublic for more information.

Obviously Omaha

October 13, 2016 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Most holiday foods fall under the heading of “comfort food.” Turkey, ham, or roast beast. Green bean casserole, stuffing, dressing, mounds of mash pitilessly drowned in a deluge of homemade gravy. But if Americans know how to do anything well, it is coming up with something unique for the holiday table. Some dishes are a rite of passage, if we’re being honest. Who really enjoys cranberry sauce, fruitcake, or gingerbread outside of the holiday season? While candy canes are the candy corn and circus peanuts of Christmas, some foods are stunts: When America gets bored, turkeys get “turducken-ed” or fried; pies and cakes are baked with cakes and/or pies inside; riddles are wrapped in mysteries, stuffed in enigmas, covered in brown sugar, and baked. Here are five beloved, unusual holiday foods available in the Omaha metro.

herringsalatHeringssalat
Heringssalat (herring salad). What could be more Christmassy than a dish from the land of ice, snow, midnight sun, flowing hot springs, and Sinterklaas? From Westphalia to Ragnarok, proud Nordics enjoy this traditional End Times dish at many family occasions, but especially on New Year’s Eve to remind themselves that no matter how bad life gets, one can always stop eating heringssalat. For the basic version, fold together pickled herring chunks, bread and butter pickles, apples, and onion. Mix in mayonnaise at the last minute to “keep it fresh.” Advanced optional mix-ins include cream, sour cream, beets, capers, mustard, potatoes, eggs, or leftover meat. A good pickled herring is worth its weight in gelt; try Absolutely Fresh Seafood (1218 S. 119th St.) or Omaha’s go-to ziel für Deutsch küche, Gerda’s (5180 Leavenworth St.).

frogeyesaladFrog eye salad
Frog eye salad is very popular in Utah, where alcohol is not, and no celebration would be complete without several versions of this classic—including the one like grandma’s and the one your health-conscious cousin makes that no one ever eats, but she keeps making anyway. The base is orzo pasta (or any pasta resembling frog’s eyes), whipped cream, pineapple juice, and mandarin oranges. Maraschino cherries may be added. Ask for Mike in the deli at Wohlner’s (3253 Dodge St.), hand him a recipe for your favorite variant, and he’ll make a salad Joseph Smith would love.

torroneTorrone
After the Feast of Seven Fishes, blood sugar levels can drop. Enter the Sicilian nougat. Torrone is like a Mars Bar without the chocolate or popularity. Orange, honey, vanilla, almonds, and/or pistachios make it distinct. Candy-making is an intense business, and results vary. If you’d like to buy locally try around. Orsi’s Italian Bakery (621 Pacific St.) orders several cases for the holidays.   

turkishdelightTurkish delight
The Ottoman Empire was not famous for producing great Christmas dishes. Rahat loukoum, aka Turkish delight, is the exception. This 250-year-old recipe of gelled starch and sugar is flavored with rosewater, cinnamon, bergamot, or fruit. Dusted with powdered sugar, nobility used to gift rahat loukoum in a handkerchief. Nerds love Turkish delight because the White Witch fed it to Edward in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. On paper, it sounds disgusting. In reality, people either love it or despise it. Especially during the holidays, it’s available in Omaha at the Mediterranean & European Grocery (8601 Blondo St.) and Green Land Market (4087 S. 84th St.). Call ahead to check availability. Enjoy!

menudoMenudo
Menudo is a Mexican tripe soup made with cow’s feet, onions, garlic, guajillo, and cumin. A popular hangover cure year-round, it’s popular when all is quiet—except for your pounding head—on New Year’s Day. Sip the broth or enjoy the chunks of slowly simmered cow stomach and your headache will become an afterthought in a hurry. Delicious! Try it at Victor’s (3223 Q St.) on Saturdays only, and at El Aguila (1837 Vinton St.) every day. Most authentic Mexican restaurants sell their own, so check around and call ahead for large quantities.

Grilled Turkey London Broil

Photography by Baldwin Publishing

Just because turkey is healthy doesn’t mean it has to be bland and boring. Try this delicious grilled turkey London broil. The ginger, soy sauce, and brown sugar marinade keep the turkey moist.

Find more great recipes at HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness. 

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp grated ginger
  • 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce or 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce (gluten free if needed)
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 2 scallions, chopped
  • 2 1/2 lbs turkey breast, butterflied
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Black pepper, to taste

Preparation

  1. In a large cup, combine olive oil, ginger, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, and scallions.
  2. In a large, shallow, glass baking dish, arrange turkey breast and pour marinade over it to cover. Turn turkey to coat both sides. Cover and marinate in refrigerator for at least 3 hours, or overnight.
  3. Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Remove turkey from marinade. Season turkey with the salt and black pepper.
  4. Grill the turkey 8 minutes on each side, or until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the turkey breast registers 165°. Let turkey rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

Nutrition Facts: Serving Size: 5 oz turkey;
Calories: 238; Fat: 9g; Saturated Fat: 1g;
Cholesterol: 70mg; Sodium: 340mg;
Carbohydrates: 3g; Fiber: 0; Protein: 34g
Yield: 8 servings

 

LondonBroil

YouthfulNest

November 13, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Gelena Wasserman needed help transferring her vision of a perfect nursery into reality.

Enter YouthfulNest.

Wasserman discovered the website while browsing for baby items.  As a working first-mom-to-be, she didn’t have time for all the research that would put her plan into action.

YouthfulNest2

Lisa Janvrin, the creative genius behind the site, relates to Wasserman’s need to nest. When Janvrin was pregnant with her oldest child, Luca, she wanted the nursery to be a serene space. She personalized it by including framed postcards from her travels and added a hint of maturity with a New York skyline painted on a lightly brushed gray wall.

After 20 years as a retail and graphic designer working from New York to Turkey to Russia, Janvrin landed in Omaha when she married.

YouthfulNest4“I believe my love for eclectic interior style is due to all the sites I have gathered in my travels,” she says.

Janvrin noticed a need in Omaha for upscale children’s design, and, with her son as her inspiration, she launched YouthfulNest. The business caters to kids of all ages with a focus on expectant mothers. Janvrin believes the site allows other options for design-savvy clients.

“We are bridging the gap between a traditional interior design and DIY,” Janvrin says.

After buying a service online, clients are asked to create a styleboard through Pinterest or Houzz. They may add a gift registry or enter contests. Janvrin calls them for a 30-minute interview or meets them face to face. It is her job to interpret the client’s inspiration and transform it into one cohesive work. She hunts and finds products online.

“I love shopping with other people’s money,” Janvrin says.

An initial consultation package costs clients $175. Wasserman wanted a positive and peaceful vibe for her daughter’s nursery, but couldn’t seem to narrow down the style.

YouthfulNest3.1

“I was all over the place,” Wasserman explains.

Therefore, she decided to buy additional services which included a floor plan ($175), a color consult ($75), and a room guide ($100).

YouthfulNest5

Janvrin sources practical and beautiful items for her clients.  She created a boho-chic style board for Wasserman. The mix of vintage and contemporary will grow with the child. Wasserman originally wanted walls painted a heavenly white. After Janvrin sent paint color schemes to Wasserman, the room design now includes one wall in a modern pink ombre.

“She really honed in on my vision and executed what I wanted,” Wasserman says.

Janvrin leans towards functionality, form, and longevity.  She is a fan of selecting items which will grow with the child.

Wasserman is happy with the ultimate design. She fell in love with her Stokke Home crib in a crisp white, which is interchangeable and can be customized for a growing child during the first five years. The overall effect of the nursery will be light, airy, and whimsical.

“I love to find ways to make kids happy…it keeps me young,” Janvrin adds.

Visit youthfulnest.com to learn more.

YouthfulNest1

Retirement on the Road

July 30, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

This article appears in 60-Plus June/July 2015 edition.

Fritz Sampson says he likes to travel slowly, but the words “travel” and “slowly” can conjure up thoughts of lounging over three hour-long dinners in Italy, or spending an entire afternoon wandering through a village in France.

For 65-year-old Fritz, “traveling slowly” means moving about 200 miles a day across Europe and Asia by motorcycle.

Last March, Fritz undertook a 115-day motorcycle journey through southern Europe, the former Soviet bloc, and Mongolia; but his plans were cut short by more than three weeks after an accident
in Mongolia.

It’s an itinerary that sounds crazy, but, when explained calmly by Fritz, seems perfectly reasonable.

“Whether it’s breaking a shoulder, or getting stopped by police, or running out of food, things are going to happen,” Fritz says. “And that’s why you take the trip, because it’s an adventure.”

According to Sampson and his wife of 40 years, Mary, he always had a daring spirit.

“That’s what I loved him for, was his sense of adventure,” Mary says. “No one is comparable to Fritz—he’s all out for the experience.

The couple met on the Model United Nations Team at Creighton University and married in 1975, right out of college. They, and their two children, moved to Germany in 1998 while Fritz pursued a degree in international tax law. His career took him everywhere from China to Belize; but he still craved different ways to see the world.

Fritz2

A long-distance cyclist, he rode for years all over the United States. But as he aged, he turned to a new mode of transportation: motorcycling.

He bought a new Harley Davidson in 2007, and in 2008 rode with his son, Marty, from Omaha to Tierra del Fuego, an island chain off the southernmost point of South America.

“One of the reasons I do this—I like meeting people on the road,” Fritz says.

After his South American excursion, Fritz was itching to do a similar trip elsewhere. He read about two motorcycle adventures on travel blogs that looked really interesting—one to the Russian far east, another in outer Mongolia—and decided to combine the two by retiring and traveling to 17 countries. He planned to begin in Ireland, meet Mary in Turkey, and eventually end up in Mongolia and Russia, but had no other itinerary.

That meant he spent a week in Bulgaria because he felt like it. He chose to go to Kazakhstan instead of Turkmenistan because he met a fellow motorcyclist who was headed there. And when he told local policemen in Turkey the name of the hostel where he was staying, they told him he shouldn’t sleep there and took him to a friend’s house, where they hosted a barbecue for him.

He also had a run-in with corrupt police in Azerbaijan, lost 22 pounds, and experienced that fateful fall in Mongolia that cut his trip short and left him with a broken shoulder.

There’s only one thing he’s cutting out of his routine: off-roading on his motorcycle, which led to his accident. But he still wants to ride on motorcycle trips across the continental United States, Alaska, and Mexico.

After all, he says, those are “easy” rides.

Fritz3

 

Fritz 1

Through A Glass Brightly

June 24, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

This article was published in the May/June 2015 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Halfway through our interview, Therman Statom apologizes. He didn’t anticipate our conversation
lasting so long, and he has an appointment at Children’s Hospital he doesn’t want to break.
The internationally renowned glass artist has been working on large-scale cloud pieces for a new
pediatric wing, and although he’s technically completed them, an 8-year-old girl is contributing the finishing touches. “She has cancer, and her father says she used to hate going to the hospital,” he explains, “but now she can’t wait to come” because of this project.

That’s why we take an hour-and-a-half break. The young girl is meeting Statom to talk about the project, and he doesn’t want to cancel or keep her waiting. That commitment to children defines much of the artist’s career. He may be acclaimed for his airy glass houses, chairs, and ladders, but it’s his passion for making a difference in young people’s lives for which he’d prefer to be known.

That passion goes back to his own formative years growing up in Washington, D.C. Although the son of physician, he was a typical “problem child,” going through high school after high school. Unlike most troubled kids who had run-ins with the law, however, Statom did something different: he hung out at the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art. “The Smithsonian was like a home to me. It was like an extra room in my house. It’s where I found myself,” he recounts. “I was there so much, I got befriended by a curator, and he got me a job mixing clay.”

That job triggered an interest that eventually led to his attending the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, where he pursued clay as an artistic medium. “In clay I made a bunch of ugly pots. They were all brown,” he laughs. “Then I started blowing glass, and I went from very traditional to really exploring. Glass was immediate. You didn’t have to fire it two or three times. You could go into the studio and have something the next day.”

He soon discovered a particular talent for working in his new material. Statom created an arced sculpture out of clear glass cones, which earned him advanced standing at the school and enabled him to graduate early. From there, he went on to earn his MFA in 1978 from the Pratt Institute School of Art and Design, where he made the jump from blowing glass to working with sheets of it. “I didn’t want to be limited,” he explains. “It’s about exploring and questioning creatively and the actual act of making. It’s about challenging yourself and learning as an individual. I have a real interest in that.”

That interest prompted him to push the boundaries of glass as art, often using the material in unexpected ways. “I like to paint on translucent surfaces,” he says. “I consider myself a painter, and I think of glass as a canvas. If I had it my way, I’d paint on air.”

For years, museums have been taking notice of Statom’s unorthodox approach, and today his work is in the permanent collections of, among others, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and the place where it all began: the Smithsonian, which features one of his signature painted pieces in the Renwick Gallery at the American Art Museum.

For as important as his own creative success is, however, Statom isn’t interested in his identity as an artist. “You don’t do anything unless you’re actively making a difference,” he emphasizes. “It’s not just narcissistic. It’s about making kids happy here and now. You have to engage. I’m more intrigued with helping people.”

To that end, he’s worked with children through a broad range of organizations, including a children’s hospital in Norfolk, VA, and the U.S. Department of State’s Art in Embassies program, through which he’s led workshops in such far-flung places as Mozambique and Turkey. Closer to home, he’s worked with the Omaha Public School’s Native American Indian Education Department, Kanesville Alternative School in Council Bluffs, Yates Alternative School in Gifford Park, and even local
Girl Scout troops.

No matter where he works with kids, the goal remains the same: to affect change in children through art. “I have kids who claim that activities in art save their lives,” Statom says. “That’s pretty big.”

Another hour into the interview, Statom glances at the clock. “It’s time to go,” he announces. There’s another girl he doesn’t want to keep waiting—his daughter. She’s about to get out of school, and just like the little girl at the hospital, he has no intention of keeping her waiting.

ThermanStaton

Turkey Soup

November 26, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

It’s the perfect way to warm up on a chilly day. Try this easy turkey soup that can also add a welcome, new twist to Thanksgiving leftovers.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup diced carrot
  • ½ cup diced celery
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • ½ tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried basil
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes, with liquid
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 can (15 oz) great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups (about 16 ounces) cubed cooked turkey
  • ½ cup cubed zucchini
  • 1 Tbsp dried parsley

Preparation

  1. In a large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until softened, about 4 minutes.
  2. Stir in carrot, celery, pepper, oregano, and basil. Cover and cook over low heat for 5 minutes.
  3. Add tomatoes with their liquid, water, broth, beans, and turkey and stir. Cover saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer gently for 30 minutes.
  4. Add zucchini and parsley and cook until zucchini is cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve.

Yield: 8 servings

 

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 165, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 0g, Cholesterol: 47mg, Sodium: 528mg, Carbohydrates: 14g, Fiber: 4g, Protein: 21g

* Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s 
nutritional content.

Thanksgiving on the Rocks

November 25, 2013 by

I love to cook, but the Thanksgiving production in my kitchen has lost its luster. On top of that, I’m not great at cooking gigantor birds, I don’t like stuffing, and it’s physically and emotionally impossible for me to make gravy. There, I said it.

My life changed a few years ago when I discovered a Thanksgiving secret. So let’s just keep this one between us, okay? Most grocery stores offer delicious pre-made turkey dinners. I saw this “secret” advertised in the newspaper. Most include a turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, and cranberry relish. (Try buying your Thanksgiving grocery list for under a $100). Some also offer other sides you can choose from. But since I love to cook to relieve stress, not induce it, I get the dinner and make a couple of our favorite sides—usually green bean casserole and pumpkin pie.

Last year, I called a pal who had her in-laws in town on Thanksgiving Day. I could hear the sweat dripping from her head, pots clanking, kids screaming—and I’m pretty sure she cussed out her husband for being in the kitchen. When I mentioned the pre-cooked turkey dinner and that I just had to heat it up, her response was a shriek. “YOU CAN DO THAT?!” Yes, you can.

Here’s what you do. You secretly order the turkey dinner, pick it up, stash it, dish it on your china, and your family is none the wiser. You save money, everyone eats, and you don’t have the annual meltdown in the kitchen this year because all of the yelling about how the football game muffled the sound of the oven timers, and now the turkey is overcooked and the pie is burned. There’s not enough whipped cream to fix a burnt pie. Trust me, I’ve tried. You get none of that shame, and all of the glory with the pre-cooked dinner. We’ll all just keep it to ourselves, and go from there.

By the way, when you have time, money, and hands freed up from all that cooking, you can do some or all of these:

  • Serve dinners to the less fortunate.
  • Donate money for dinners to the Food Bank, Together, or other local agencies committed to fighting hunger.
  • Play with your kids.
  • Go for a run or workout before you eat (because you don’t have to tend to all that stuff in the kitchen).
  • Spend the rest of your Thanksgiving budget on Black Friday, or better yet, a nice bottle of wine.
  • When’s the last time you watched the entire parade?

 

Read more of Murrell’s stories at momontherocks.com.

Tomato Tomäto

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Tomato Tomäto, a year-round, indoor farmers market whose name plays off the debate over how to pronounce the name of the versatile fruit (Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable), is a must-stop-shop for many in the Omaha area who enjoy fresh produce, eggs, nuts, many organic goods, and more.

Tucked back from street view near 156th and Bob Booser Drive (just north of West Center Road) in West Omaha, the store carries products from dozens of vendors, all of them local. However you say it, it’s a win-win for the entire Omaha community.

Jody Fritz and her husband, Jeremy, were no strangers to the local farmers markets. As regular weekend representatives of Jody’s father-in-law’s O’Neill, Neb., farm, Garden Fresh Vegetables, the couple got to know the other vendors pretty well.20120904_bs_9299 copy

As the weather grew cooler and the outdoor markets closed up shop, the couple realized they and their fellow vendors still had plenty to offer would-be consumers. “There still is a lot out there when the markets end, so we kind of came up with this idea,” says Fritz. That idea was to utilize the front portion of the Garden Fresh Vegetables’ Omaha warehouse as a year-round farmers market. Vendors bring their products into the shop and set their own prices, and Tomato Tomäto receives a commission off of everything that sells.

“We didn’t really have any capital to start, so that’s where the consignment idea came from, and it’s worked out well,” explains Fritz. “Consumers pay a little less than they would at Whole Foods…and the producers make more money than they do selling wholesale, so it’s kind of a nice middle place for everybody.”

“We’ll have winter squashes and greens that grow in greenhouses—lettuces, cucumbers, tomatoes, some peppers, those kinds of things—all year round.” – Jody Fritz, co-owner

Since the store opened nearly five years ago, the number of vendors has grown from five to 100. “As more vendors come in, each kind of has their own following, so then all their customers come in and they become customers of a lot of the other vendors,” says Fritz.

Products range from-fresh produce, eggs, milk, and meats (farm fresh chicken, beef, fish, ostrich, and more) to local wines, salsas, soup starters, breads, and pastas, just to name few. “There are always a lot of things going on.” All inventory is fresh and local; organic, as well as gluten-free, options are available.20120904_bs_9295 copy

Regarding the year-round produce selection, Fritz says that, understandably, there is an ebb and flow throughout the year. “We’ll have winter squashes and greens that grow in greenhouses—lettuces, cucumbers, tomatoes, some peppers, those kinds of things—all year round.”

But Fritz concedes that because Tomato Tomäto specializes in locally produced foods, there are certain items that her store will never be able to offer her customers. “We won’t ever have bananas in Nebraska,” she says through a chuckle. “I get that there are limitations to the place, but I’m just going to embrace those rather than trying to be something we aren’t. I can’t compromise…there are so many foods you can eat in season.”

The colder months bring with them opportunities for customers to order free-range, organic turkeys for Thanksgiving, as well as buy homemade holiday pies and find locally produced spirits to ring in the New Year and celebrate Valentine’s Day. “There’s always a season for everything, it seems,” says Fritz.

Alyssa LeGrand has been a customer of Tomato Tomäto since the market opened and says the quality of the produce is fantastic. “I like to support local farmers and anybody with their own business,” she says. Appreciating the competitive prices, LeGrand says she often stops in on a weekly basis.20120904_bs_9291 copy

On the supplier side, Ryan Pekarek, owner of Pekarek Produce in Dwight, Neb., has been bringing his produce to Tomato Tomäto for three years and says he looks forward to continuing to work with Fritz in the future. “[Tomato Tomäto] is nice because you come back with an empty truck every time.”

In addition to the market side of the business, Tomato Tomäto also runs a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Program in which customers can become members of the CSA by purchasing shares in the program and, every week, receive fresh produce and local products. “I just didn’t have enough room for everything people wanted to bring in, so we were trying to find a way for the farmers to bring their food here and to get it into the hands of people quickly.”

For some, this indoor farmers market may just be the best-kept secret in Omaha. For others, specifically the approximately 100 vendors that supply a wide variety of products to Tomato Tomäto’s devoted customers, it’s the answer to their prayers.

Tomato Tomäto
2634 S. 156th Cir.
402-933-0893
tomatotomato.org

Wines for Holiday Fare

October 25, 2012 by

There are a wide variety of dishes prepared to celebrate the holiday season, and many of these reflect back to culture and ethnicity. However, I would suspect that the three classic dishes for holiday fare are turkey, ham, and crown roast of beef. The type of wines for each of these varies somewhat, depending on the accompaniments and method of preparation, but the core philosophy for wine-food pairings remains fairly straightforward. Let us discuss the wine matches for each of these three dishes.

Matching the weight of a dish with that of the wine is the starting point for marrying a wine with food. Turkey is a medium-weight dish that will work best with a medium-weight wine—red or white—depending on the ancillary ingredients. For example, if the bird is stuffed with a standard giblet-based dressing, you could choose either wine style. My choice would be a Pinot Noir or red Burgundy. On the other hand, if an oyster stuffing was used, a crisp white wine would be the better choice. The flavor in oysters (and most seafood) is enhanced by the crisp acidity found in many white wines. This is the reason that a squeeze of lemon is frequently served with seafood. With the oyster stuffing, my personal favorite wine would be a white Burgundy.

For ham, the same principle applies—match the weight of the food to that of the wine. There are two issues to consider with ham. First of all, it’s a salty food, and salty foods call for tart wines. Second, the sweetness of the dish must be considered. In a simple, unadorned presentation, ham has no sweetness. A Pinot Gris or Sauvignon Blanc would both be good choices. However, if the ham is cured with maple sugar or is glazed with a sweet, fruity glaze, you must bring sweetness into the equation. My mother always basted her ham with a brown-sugar-fruity glaze, and prior to baking decorated it with fresh pineapple chunks and red cherries. With this combination, we have a sweet, salty product that calls for a sweet, tart wine. There is no better wine with these credentials than a quality German Riesling. My choice would be a Riesling Spätlese from the Mosel Valley.

This brings us to the stuffed crown roast of beef. The choice is simple here. This is a big, hearty dish that calls for a big, hearty wine. There is no white wine that can stand up to the majesty and gusto of a crown roast of beef. It doesn’t matter what dressing you stuff in the roast; the sheer volume of the dish dictates the wine style. A full-bodied Cabernet or high-quality red Bordeaux will make the perfect match.

I hope that you can see how the ancillary ingredients and method of preparation can tip your hand from one wine style to another. Remember, a correct wine-food pairing can elevate a dish from simple to sublime. Happy Holidays!

John Fischer is a member and past president of the International Wine & Food Society, Omaha Branch.