Tag Archives: teenagers

Footloose

June 26, 2015 by

This article appears in June 2015 edition of Her Family.

Perhaps there is no age that can appreciate the joys of summer more than the teens. Swimsuit weather, no homework, driving privileges…finally. Even those older teenagers with jobs have time and freedom unlike during the school year. It is a glorious time in which lifelong memories are made.

But getting there safely takes a little planning and, perhaps, good ideas and a little encouragement from mom or dad.

Left to their own devices, it would be easy for many teens to quickly fall into negative patterns once the last bell sounds on the school year. While there’s certainly a place for sleeping in, lazy days, and video game marathons, no one, including your teen, is going to feel good about a summer in which nothing else is accomplished. Or, as they might say the week before school starts, “I feel like I wasted my whole vacation.”

Or, even worse, they have too much freedom, leading to trouble or tragedy.

In the Omaha area, there are many options for teens to get involved. If you haven’t already talked with your student about creating a plan for how they will spend their break, you still can.

Many of the big-three choices are already determined by this time: summer employment, summer school, or other school-related activities like athletics or band camp. It may not be too late for your teen to still find a job, but the longer they wait, the harder it may be for them to find something they like that will be flexible enough for their other summer activities.

If a job is not an option, there are other ways to encourage your teen to stay somewhat productive and busy. Look for volunteer opportunities. Even if they are not ongoing, having established projects will keep kids active and learning. Check with your place of worship, your school—even your own workplace might provide opportunities for teens to volunteer.

Teen driving fatalities start going up in June and peak in August.

Local nonprofits have their own rules about their volunteer workforce. Special rules apply when working directly with clients, but in Omaha especially, non-profit organizations hold events nearly every weekend and can always use willing workers to help. Fundraising events like golf tournaments, 5K runs, or auctions generally rely on volunteer power to be successful. Projects like these are terrific ways for older teens to strengthen their resumes for college or future employment.

Just setting a minimum standard or goal for the summer is a step forward for many kids. For example, one goal might be that your child will be responsible for getting dinner on the table twice each week, plus keeping the yard mowed and trimmed—whatever makes sense in your home. The idea is that your teen is not left with endless and empty days to fill with no direction or support.

Parents should also be aware that summer—not winter—is by far the most dangerous time for teen drivers. Teen driving fatalities start going up in June and peak in August. You may want to have a conversation that revisits basic safe driving rules about having additional teens in the vehicle, drinking and driving, texting and driving, and frankly, unnecessary driving.

Above all, cherish the time you still have with your children at home. Enjoy the adults they are becoming, and do what you can to help them get there—happily and safely.

BevCarlson

JoysofSummer

Just a Little Respect

January 16, 2015 by

I can’t believe this,” Troy says.

“Sorry, Troy,” Nate replies.

“Yeah, me too…f**,” Troy says, using a homophobic epithet as he walks away.

And that starts it all.

Nate’s voice is full of defeat, shoulders slumped, face downcast. Even with glasses, tattered baseball cap and a plaid shirt, Troy is menacing compared to a shorter Nate.

Put yourself there. What would you do next?

This is just one scenario RESPECT, an anti-bullying group here in Omaha, poses to teenagers. Using short theatrical productions, RESPECT hopes to educate youth on how to handle abusive relationships. Standing Up, by Nick Zadina, is just one example of 14 plays these professional actors perform for schools around Nebraska and Iowa.

Executive Director Patricia Newman founded RESPECT as a problem-solving and communication tool for children of all ages. Bullying won’t ever go away, she says, but it can be decreased by education.

Newman, a clinical child physiologist, is hoping students will stop unhealthy and violent patterns early before reaching adulthood. “Kids can self-identify and change their bullying habits,” Newman believes. “The more times you hear it, it clicks.”

Just this year, the Centers for Disease Control reported 19.6 percent of high school students have been bullied sometime during the school year. Newman recalls being picked on as a child because she was poor and from a divorced home. Luckily, she says teachers made the difference by making her feel special. “The power in the classroom is amazing,” Newman says. Millard West junior Cody Janke says Standing Up was realistic and “not your average corny play you see in school.”

Once the play finishes, the actors allow students a few moments to write down anonymous questions on notecards. Greg, one of the 10 professional actors for RESPECT, pauses before responding to one student’s question, “Have you ever been bullied?”

Greg (RESPECT actors asked that only their first names be used) mentions how someone at school had once left a death threat in his locker after he talked to the bully’s girlfriend.

“I was terrified and a freshman so had no idea what to do,” Greg recalls. He ended up reporting the incident to counselors who helped the bully with his anger and jealousy.

The class is quiet and not quick to volunteer, so the RESPECT actors change things up by role-playing. One of the actors plays the part of the bully as he knocks books out of another actor’s hands.

“Okay, okay, so what would you do?” he asks the class.

One brave student, freshman Dan Catania, volunteers to role-play as the bystander. His shaggy brown hair covers his face as he picks up the books scattered on the floor.

“Dude, why did you do that?” Dan asks the actor. “Now, say you’re sorry.”

With an infectious grin, he apologizes and tells Dan “good job.”

With 251 programs each year and around 40,000 students, Newman hopes stepping into the action will teach kids from preschool to college to empower themselves and come up with their own solutions to make their lives safer.

After the RESPECT team leaves, most of the students agree bullying occurs mainly in middle school. Janke, a high school football running back, believes many teenagers outgrow these negative tendencies. Tall and muscular with a bit of a five o’clock shadow, he admits to being the bully once in middle school, although feels some of it was provoked. Now that he is older and more mature, he says he feels it isn’t worth it to put other people down.

Many students also say girls tend to be worse in middle school than boys. One of the freshman female students says boys are more willing to talk it out, while girls do everything on social media or behind someone’s back. Although statistics show boys are 1.7 times more likely than girls to bully, girls show a higher trend of victimizing others through rumors. “They (girls) are vicious,” she says with a laugh. “Guys are just like, ‘Bro, what are you doing?”

Newman agrees bullying today is deadlier because of the intensity and how quickly it happens on social media. She hopes RESPECT will give students one more tool to transform something negative into a positive.

Newman shares a touching letter she received from one boy:

“Thank you. You may have saved my life.”

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Secret Penguin’s Dave Nelson

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Seven years of touring full-time as a sponsored skateboarder leaves you with A) a lot of skateboarding product from your sponsors and B) a definite magnetism for skater kids looking to channel their energy.

“Skateboarders have an addictive personality,” confesses Dave Nelson, a former skateboarder for Untitled Skateboards and the owner of Downtown Omaha brand strategy and design firm Secret Penguin. “That’s all they think about…skating. They’re consuming, passionate people.” So when fellow skateboarder Mike Smith asked if he’d like to be on the board of a new nonprofit called Skate For Change, “I was like, yes, instantly. Completely excited about it.”

In his TEDxOmaha presentation last October, Smith explained that a closing skate park had offered him its ramps while he was working with homeless teenagers in Lincoln (TEDxOmaha is a local conference inspired by world-renowned TED events, dedicated to spreading world-changing ideas). Taking the opportunity and running with it, Smith started Bay 198, an indoor skate park in a Lincoln mall. “It answered a missing point,” Nelson says. “The kids needed a place that was genuine and safe.”

In the meantime, Smith had been skating through Lincoln on his lunch break, handing out socks and bottled water to the downtown homeless. Friends started joining him, then kids, then energy-drink maker Red Bull even stepped in with a launch party for the park and effort. “I’m just watching all of these skate kids pour their lives and their hearts and their souls into helping people,” Smith said at TEDxOmaha. “Feeding people.”

“He said when I gave him that board and took time to talk and skate with him, it made him realize that there are good people out there that do care about others.”

Secret Penguin handled the branding of the new incarnation of the skate park (now simply called The Bay) at 20th and Y streets in Lincoln. The Bay’s new park is made out of cement and bricks, “so it would feel more like the street,” Nelson explains. Most indoor skate parks are made of wood.

An indoor skate park for Omaha similar to Lincoln’s The Bay isn’t far from Nelson’s thoughts, but for now his typical haunt is Roberts Skate Park at 78th and Cass streets. He’s there about three times a week, meeting new people and trying new tricks.

“A few months ago,” he recalls, “I ran into this kid that I’d met at Roberts maybe 10 years ago.” The young man told Nelson that on that day, his parents were gone on yet another bender. His friends knew no one was home, so they broke into his house and stole all his stuff. The boy decided he was going to kill himself but first, one last skate at Roberts Park. He met Nelson there, who gave him one of the boards from his sponsors and talked with him. “He said when I gave him that board and took time to talk and skate with him, it made him realize that there are good people out there that do care about others,” Nelson remembers. “He said that was the first time he can remember feeling like someone cared. And that skateboard was a representation of hope to him throughout the years.”

On Saturdays, Nelson meets interested skaters at either the Mastercraft building, 13th & Nicholas, or in front of The Slowdown for Omaha’s own version of Skate For Change. “We’ll go hand the stuff out to whomever,” he says, referring to the donations of bottled water or socks received at the Secret Penguin office or purchased with donations forwarded from Smith. “Kids just get behind something like this.”

“We don’t need money,” he says, “just supplies.” Anyone wanting to donate water, socks, canned tuna, or hygiene kits can drop them off at the Secret Penguin office in the Mastercraft building.

Bipolar Disease

November 25, 2012 by

“My husband didn’t know if he was going to come home to Cruella Deville or Dolly Levi from Hello Dolly.” That’s how Jane Pauley, broadcast journalist and former co-host of the TV morning show Today, described her battle with bi-polar disease in a interview on Healthy Minds, produced by New York Public Radio. “Who knows what provokes it, but it was like a swarm of bees that wants a target,” she says.

Being diagnosed with bipolar disease was a shock, recalls Pauley, but getting a diagnosis and subsequent treatment, however, allowed her to regain some normalcy in her life again.

Bipolar disease is a serious mental illness that is associated with extreme mood swings from mania to depression. “It is one of the most serious illnesses we deal with because of the disruptive nature of the disease,” says Sharon Hammer, M.D., psychiatrist at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC). “It is more serous than depression or schizophrenia because it can lead to risky behaviors, such as drug and alcohol abuse, damaged relationships, and suicide. And because of the impulsive nature of the disease, there is often no time to intervene.”

The average onset of bipolar disease tends to occur in older teenagers and young adults ages 20 to 25 years old. “Many women may start to experience symptoms of depression in their teenage years followed by their first manic episode in college,” says Hammer. “This is a very risky time because the college years are often mixed with stress, sleep deprivation, and alcohol use, which are all triggers for episodes.”

“It is one of the most serious illnesses we deal with because of the disruptive nature of the disease.” – Sharon Hammer, M.D., psychiatrist at UNMC

Women with bipolar disease typically spend about 80 percent of the time in depression and 20 percent in mania. Episodes of mania are characterized by abnormal elevated moods that include irritability, being easily agitated, impulsivity, racing thoughts, and insomnia.

Many women tend to be in denial and don’t start taking it seriously until they have children, notes Hammer. Even then, it is often misdiagnosed as depression or anxiety due to the extended depressive states associated with the condition, and the fact that women are twice as likely to have depression than men. In fact, bipolar disease is the most under-diagnosed mental illness and the most challenging to diagnose, notes Hammer.

Misdiagnosis can create more problems because medications used for depression and anxiety are different than those used to treat bipolar disease and can make the condition worse.

In addition, untreated bipolar disease tends to gain momentum and become more malignant with time, says P.J. Malin, M.D., a psychiatrist with Alegent Creighton Clinic and an associate professor of psychiatry at Creighton University School of Medicine. “It can be very disruptive to other parts of your life. Approximately 60 percent of people with bipolar disease will develop substance abuse problems, and it carries a 15 to 20 percent suicide rate.

“Early treatment of the disease can help prevent the disease from getting more aggressive. Untreated bipolar disease, on the other hand, lowers one’s life expectancy by 10 years.”

If you are being treated for depression and are not responding to depression medications or you are experiencing negative or an unusual response, it is important to communicate this with your provider, adds Malin.

“Early treatment of the disease can help prevent the disease from getting more aggressive.” – P.J. Malin, M.D., psychiatrist with Alegent Creighton Clinic

You can also do your own test by taking the Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ) online, which provides fairly accurate results and can help you and your clinician determine whether you are bipolar, notes Hammer.

Environmental factors and heredity appear to be the major risk factors for bipolar disease, says Malin. “There are different theories as to how the environment plays a role, but they include: obstetric complications, intra-utero viral infections, use of hallucinogenic drugs, and traumatic life events, such as the death of family or friends or abuse.”

Treatment typically involves a combination of medications and counseling that may be necessary over a person’s lifetime. “Counseling is huge for long-term success and stabilization,” says Robin Houser, a counselor for Nebraska Methodist Hospital’s employee assistance program, Bestcare EAP. “Bipolar disease is a lifetime problem, and counseling can help people learn coping techniques and avoid unhealthy thinking and unhealthy patterns of behavior. A lot of people think that once they have become stabilized that they don’t need medications or counseling anymore, but that’s when we’ll start seeing imbalances and manic episodes occur again.”

Women with bipolar disease are very sensitive to stress, lack of sleep, and environmental and seasonal changes, all of which can trigger an episode, notes Hammer. Practicing healthy lifestyle habits like getting regular exercise, adequate sleep, managing stress, and light therapy during the winter months can help keep the disease stabilized.

 “Counseling is huge for long-term success and stabilization.” – Robin Houser, counselor for Nebraska Methodist Hospital

Postpartum is also a common time to experience recurrences, probably because of sleep deprivation, says Hammer. There are medications that are safe to use during pregnancy, which are important to take to prevent a relapse. If a woman stops her medications during pregnancy, it can take up to six months to get the symptoms under control again, says Hammer.

“Newer medications as a whole have fewer side effects,” she says, “but it’s important that you are matched with the medication that works best for you and has the fewest side effects.

“Patients who are being followed and treated by a trained health care professional can function vey well and live a normal life.”