Tag Archives: social media

November/December 2018 Instagram

October 24, 2018 by

Here are the nine images featured in our September/October issue. Click on the photos to view the contributors’ Instagram accounts. Include the hashtag #OmahaMagazine with your Instagram photos to be featured in the next issue of Omaha Magazine.

Follow Omaha Magazine on social media via InstagramFacebook, and Twitter. Find us at @omahamagazine.


@alexispateraxx

@rockhoppingpenguin

@alisontopphotography

@eternal_and_unchanging

@hayleyocho

@huskertiara

@sarxcasey

@sixhexsix

@wanderrockphotography


This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Fishing With Flair

October 15, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Andrew Flair uploaded his first video to YouTube at age 15. As video productions go, there wasn’t much to it: four rough-cut minutes of Flair—then a freshman at Millard North—standing on the shore of a pond in suburban Omaha, fishing for bass. 

Flair, who turned 21 this year, has been fishing the waters in and around Omaha nearly his entire life. “As soon as I could hold a reel I was fishing,” he remembers. A love for the sport was passed down from his father, and the first videos Flair uploaded to his YouTube channel, Fishing with Flair, were made primarily for an audience of family and friends. “Just sharing tips,” he says. “Not much more than videos of me catching fish then tossing them back.” 

Quickly, though, Flair was posting fishing videos at a rate of two to three a week. While these early clips left much to be desired in terms of entertainment value, those formative years were, if nothing else, a full-immersion education in video editing and ease before a camera. 

The six years that have passed since Flair’s first upload are, in internet time, an eternity. As of this writing, Fishing with Flair is gaining new subscribers at a rate of roughly 25 to 30 thousand a month. 

What’s drawing them? Flair, mainly. After starring in more than 800 episodes, Flair’s natural charm and enthusiasm have a way of gluing your eyes to the screen. The content is fun, too. There are the “Barbie Rod Challenge” clips, the big-catch excursions to Mexico, and more. One episode finds Flair in full swamp camo, lying in the reeds of a golf course pond, trying to catch whatever he can while avoiding the eye of the fairway police carting overhead. 

As viewership rose over the years, Flair found himself bringing in a modest but regular income from ads placed before his videos.  

The moment of truth came the summer after graduation. Flair remembers, “I had just finished high school, was working at Scheels, and was enrolled to start college in the fall. I’d just bought a new truck but didn’t really have any other expenses since I still lived with my parents. It was all or nothing, so I just went for it.” Flair dropped out of the University of Nebraska-Omaha and has been fishing for a living ever since. 

To say that Flair is a professional YouTuber is an oversimplification. More accurately, he is a documentarian, brand manager, fisherman, duck hunter, and burgeoning media mogul with his hand in at least a half dozen business ventures, all of which are connected by a long spool of monofilament line to that original clip of a high school freshman casting for bass one day after school.

While the “work” of regularly passing your days with a line in the water from sunrise to sunset may sound enviable to some, there are a whole host of other labors that are inherent to YouTube fame.   

For one, there’s the editing, reducing several hours of footage into one digestible 15-minute clip. There is also the attendant Instagramming, Snapchatting, Tweeting, and across-the-board brand sustenance required for life as a professional internet personality. All of which, by the way, must occur on a daily (at minimum) basis for fear of losing follower interest.

One can imagine that a less ambitious 21-year-old might stop here. For Flair, though, YouTube fame is only the launching pad to what has quickly become a multi-armed media machine. In fall 2016, Flair partnered with four other YouTube fishing personalities from across the country—each of them charismatic 20-somethings in their own right, producing fun and informative fishing content. The collective dubbed themselves The Googan Squad—“googan” being a pejorative term for the lowest of lowlife fishermen, an epithet often lobbed at the loud-talking, bank-sitting, fresh-water anglers that more seasoned sportsmen hope to avoid.  

The name solidified the young entrepreneurs’ image as a band of rogues, while also allowing them to court sponsors with greater clout. “Once we’d joined together under one name, we could approach advertisers and say honestly that we had access to 3.5 million viewers between the five of us,” Flair says. 

Today, the Googan Squad collectively owns a home in Dallas, Texas, that serves both as corporate office and crash pad for fishing excursions throughout the state. 

For Flair, what started as a hobby now includes a signature gear collection, a clothing line, a printing company, a mobile fishing app, and a private coffee label. 

On July 3, Flair and his teammates unveiled their biggest endeavor yet, their own line of patented bait and lures, Googan Baits. After heavy cross-platform promotion (the Googan Baits Instagram account boasted over 50 thousand followers before even making a single post) the first run of product sold out in 25 minutes.     

With so much momentum at his back, what awaits Flair in the murky waters of the future? “None of this has been done before, so it’s tough to tell,” he says. “I want to ride this out as long as I can. It will definitely come to an end. All celebrity comes to an end. I’d be fairly shocked if this lasts more than five years.” 

For now, as long as the fish and followers are biting, Flair will keep baiting the hook.


Find Flair’s latest videos on his YouTube channel with the simple handle “Flair,” or catch him on Snapchat (aflair430), Facebook (Fishing with Flair), Instagram (Fishing_with_Flair), or Twitter (@fishinwithflair).

This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

September/October 2018 Instagram

August 23, 2018 by

Here are the nine images featured in our September/October issue. Click on the photos to view the contributors’ Instagram accounts. Include the hashtag #OmahaMagazine with your Instagram photos to be featured in the next issue of Omaha Magazine.

Follow Omaha Magazine on social media via Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Find us at @omahamagazine.

@_jules_photoshots_

@bartyandlalo

@ben271

@cooper_333

@huskertiara

@ian_ziegler_photography

@patriciayocum_

@sarxcasey

@wanderrockphotography


This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

A Changing Landscape for Newspapers

August 16, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

“You’ve been reduced” said the voice on the other end of the phone. It was an editor from The Omaha World-Herald—where I wrote a humor column called “Breaking Brad” for eight years, as well as a Sunday sports column, “Upon Further Review”—calling to tell me I was one of about a dozen layoffs at the paper on Feb. 20. 

While a phone call may not seem like the best way of informing a colleague that their job has ended, considering the sometimes icy impersonality of The World-Herald, I was lucky the editor didn’t fax me.

My termination felt like a prisoner of war experience. I was summoned to Human Resources where I had to sign a series of propaganda-type documents while a platoon of HR reps, none of whom lost their jobs, sat watching a Diagnosis Murder rerun on MeTV.

This was actually my second time being terminated by the newspaper. The first was when I was a kid carrier. I recall it had something to do with drawing devil horns on several U.S. Supreme Court justices on a front page photo and some uptight customer complaining.

The newspaper I delivered back in 1970-something was different from the paper today. It was quite a bit heavier and thicker than the 2018 version, the Monday and Tuesday editions of which increasingly resemble a discarded doily lying in your neighbor’s driveway.

It wasn’t supposed to be like this. When the internet arrived, the conventional wisdom was that we will always need newspapers. Newspapers still always serve a vital function in the community, we all understood. Of course this was before Americans realized they preferred getting their news in targeted online blurbs blasted across social media by Russian troll farms.

It’s not really news if you can’t forward it to all your friends, right?

Our idea of news today is an Internet headline reading “SENATOR TOBACCO SHOP SEX RING” or “PARDONED WHITE HOUSE THANKSGIVING TURKEYS WERE NORTH KOREAN SPIES” that are blatantly false, but hey, the main thing is they were fun to share on social media.

Perhaps even more significant than newspaper subscribers going away, advertisers have migrated online. The double whammy of lost subscribers and declining ad revenue are taking a serious toll. The Denver Post newsroom has gone from 184 employees in 2012 to about 70 today. Alongside an editorial lambasting the publication’s “vulture capitalist” ownership (the newspaper is part of Digital First Media’s chain of newspapers, owned by New York City hedge fund Alden Global Capital), The Denver Post ran a photo illustration showing the gutted newsroom team that won a Pulitzer for breaking news coverage of the Aurora theater shooting.    

The 2018 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography went to an ex-journalist for an image—a man driving through a crowd of counter-protesters at a white nationalist rally—captured on his last shift at The Daily Progress, the sole daily newspaper of Charlottesville, Virginia. He received the Pulitzer after leaving the journalism profession for a job at a Virginia brewery.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people employed in the newspaper publishing industry fell by almost 60 percent between 1990 and 2016.

In his book The Vanishing Newspaper, author Philip Meyer writes that newspaper leaders who realize they’re in a losing battle often engage in something called “harvesting market position”—business jargon for raising prices and lowering quality to squeeze your most loyal customers as they die off. In a template that will sound familiar to World-Herald subscribers, this usually calls for reducing content, laying off staff, shrinking page size and jacking up rates. The goal is to soak your remaining subscribers for all the revenue you can get from a diminished product.

Let’s go back to that Tuesday in February when I was reduced. I didn’t feel awful. I’d backed into journalism. I was a TV comedy writer who went to work for NBC and penned monologue material for The Tonight Show With Jay Leno from 1992-2006. Writing jokes about Monica Lewinsky and Happy Meals paid more than journalism. 

I told the mid-level editor breaking my bad news that I’d stay on for a reduced salary, roughly the same as I got to deliver the paper as a kid. I loved my job and my readers. The editor thought that was a terrific idea.

My fans, a passionate lot, weighed in on social media. They didn’t understand my “reduction.” A December 2015 World-Herald survey indicated my column was one of the paper’s more popular features. All the mid-level editor could muster was that my reduction probably had something to do with my poorly promoted online column not receiving enough clicks.

On Twitter, one reader posted a photo of his last newspaper—still in the plastic bag—before canceling his subscription. Hundreds, maybe thousands, of others lashed out. They emailed, wrote to and called editors. This was approaching a reader revolt. Surely the paper didn’t want to alienate all these subscribers. I thought I might be invited back. I thought wrong.

But I’m not alone. Newspapers were caught flat-footed by the internet thing, and the initial response—which pretty much consisted of an editor waving a rally monkey in the office and hoping for the best—was sorely lacking. Now papers are playing catch up and adapting to a swiftly changing landscape that demands severe belt-tightening and digital revenue strategies.

Studies have shown people are less likely to read an entire online article and thus are less educated on current events. This tilt toward digital could mean there won’t be any more checks and balances for local elected officials who may begin pillaging and looting their communities sans fear of reputational reprisal. Marauding local politicians will be stampeding like escaped zoo animals swallowing whole anything of value that isn’t tied down.

Bereft of newspapers, Americans will eventually get all their news from a single emoticon: sad face indicating a bad news day, happy face meaning all is well.

In June, it was announced that Berkshire Hathaway hired Lee Enterprises to manage The World-Herald and Berkshire’s 29 other newspapers. The goal may center on significant cost-cutting. I cannot confirm whether the World-Herald office stapler is now coin-operated.

Cuts and innovation may indeed prove to be the answer for print. Some very bright people are optimistic about the future. Even Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook team in Europe publishes a quarterly print magazine, Grow (available in the United Kingdom and Northern Europe).

There are certainly big success stories in print media’s dystopian “Brave New World.” The New York Times and Washington Post are integrating print with digital channels to thrive. The Times has set a goal of $900 million in digital revenue by 2020 after pulling in nearly $600 million in 2017. It turns out readers are willing to pay for online content when they enjoy the product enough.

Of course, not everyone will make a go of it. But those newspapers that are fast on their feet and can adjust to a new world order in journalism have a good chance to succeed. If not, the joke’s on all of us. 


Follow Brad Dickson on Twitter at @brad_dickson.

This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

July/August 2018 Instagram

August 13, 2018 by

Here are the nine images featured in our July/August issue. Click on the photos to view the contributors’ Instagram accounts. Include the hashtag #OmahaMagazine with your Instagram photos to be featured in the next issue of Omaha Magazine.

Follow Omaha Magazine on social media via Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Find us at @omahamagazine.

@aureum.vitae

@alisontoppphotography

@boipinoy

@eternal_and_unchanging

@huskertiara

@jfnlife

@kdkader

@sherry_591

@wanderrockphotography


The Pick of the Zip

June 29, 2018 by
Photography by William Hess

Omaha has been named one of America’s “Best Cities for Foodies,” yet we often find ourselves in a self-imposed rut by heading to the same diners for breakfast, the same cafes for lunch, and the same restaurants for dinner.

It’s time to break the cycle and explore outside our daily routines. Whether you’re looking to find a new lunch place near your work, or if you’re planning date night logistics around soccer games and play rehearsals, we’ve developed a list of must-try dish picks for every zip code in the Omaha area (one dish per zip).

Along with zip codes in Omaha city limits, we expanded coverage to incorporate outlying areas (with the Platte River as our western and southern boundary). We also included three Iowa zip codes for a more complete presentation of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metro. Zip codes are arranged numerically in order.

We couldn’t do this on our own, so we reached out to some of Omaha’s leading food Instagrammers. These foodies know a thing or two about a beautiful meal. We sent them a list of the Omaha metro’s zip codes, and they replied with their dish picks. I curated excerpts from their contributed lists—supplemented by a few picks of my own—to complete this guide. 

Bon appetit!


Omaha-Council Bluffs Metro Area Zip Codes


Meet Our Instagram Foodie Consultants

@OOOOmaha_Eats (Heba Abdel-Rahim)

I started @OOOOmaha_Eats because when I lived in Austin, Texas, I always kept up-to-date with hip, new food joints through foodies’ Instagram accounts. When I moved to Omaha, I wanted to try new places and explore Omaha. I thought, ‘What better way to do so than through food?’ I already was taking pictures of all the new places I was trying, so I started my own foodie account.

@EatOurWorld (Margaret Davenport and Levi Campbell)

Our Instagram account, @EatOurWorld, is a shared endeavor. It began a few years ago when Levi had to design a website for a class and asked Margaret for help. We knew we wanted to do something food-related, so we decided to focus on local dishes, farmers, and products that make any region that we are visiting really stand out. There’s so much good food in Nebraska that has been made or produced here; some of our local dishes are just as good, if not better, than dishes you may find in the world’s leading food tourism destinations. Although we are primarily focused on Lincoln, we also frequent Omaha for dinner excursions.

@TheWalkingTourists (Tim and Lisa Trudell)

Our goal with @TheWalkingTourists Instagram account is to highlight and showcase the sights, eats, and fascinating activities from explorations of our backyard in Omaha and beyond. We hope to inspire people to get out and find new adventures. Together we wrote the book 100 Things to do in Omaha Before You Die, which is available for sale online and in local bookstores. We are also working on another book, Unique Eats and Eateries of Omaha, scheduled for spring 2019 release.

@OmahaEat (Yuko Dobashi)

I started my Instagram account to practice food photography and share my recipes and restaurant reviews in Omaha. Posting photos and interacting with other foodies gives me motivation to keep learning about my camera and Photoshop. My goal is to have more photos and recipes published.

@Omaha.Feast (Meredith George)

Instagram has been such a fun way to continue exploring Omaha and connect with friends and family—people love to talk about food and what their favorite places are. Running a “foodstagram” has helped me expand my tastes and push me outside my comfort zone. It’s also encouraged me to #eatlocal and continue to prioritize our awesome local restaurants and chefs.

@FoodOmaha402 (Neal Bierman)

I have loved going out to eat at local restaurants in Omaha ever since my parents started taking me out with them in the ’90s. I want to show Omahans, people in town for business, or folks vacationing in the Big O that there are so many amazing restaurants here. I truly admire and respect all the local restaurant owners, the risk and hard work they put in to start a restaurant, and the staff who make the dining experience so enjoyable. People in Omaha love going out to eat for entertainment, and I want to showcase that through Instagram.


Zip: 51501

Specializing in deep-fried catfish, carp, and Alaskan “walleye” (pollock), Council Bluffs’ Mo Fish (2403 Nash Blvd.) dips customers’ taste buds in an array of fried-fish flavors. Throughout the establishment, fish nets, fish replicas, and other fishy decorations hang from the walls and ceiling. Carpe diem with the carp dinner, which comes with toasted bread and two homemade sides: fries, coleslaw, or baked beans.  

  • Dish pick: carp dinner at Mo Fish
  • Price: $11.95
  • Website: mofishcafe.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402

Top of page

Zip: 51503

Barley’s (114 W. Broadway in Council Bluffs) offers a broad menu and generous portions of upscale pub food. The Chicken Hawk Sandwich is a big bite: lightly breaded, fried chicken breast topped with ranch dressing, bacon, and Swiss cheese, served with a side of fries. Our foodie consultant declared, “Chick-fil-A had better watch out!”

  • Dish pick: Chicken Hawk Sandwich at Barley’s 
  • Price: $9
  • Website: barleysbar.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402

Top of page

Zip: 51510

Tacos at Jonesy’s are a local Tex-Mex classic. They aren’t fancy (with their fried shells and processed American cheese), but they are humongous, tasty, and filling. Fans of Jonesy’s can get their fix at four area locations. Two brothers started the restaurant with locations in Aksarben and Council Bluffs; their children expanded the franchise with additional locations in Carter Lake and Council Bluffs. The Carter Lake location (1116 Locust St.) is an offshoot of the Aksarben branch, and it features more American dishes than available at the parent location.

  • Dish pick: tacos at Jonesy’s Taco House Carter Lake
  • Price: $3 (beef or chicken), $3.25 (fish), $3.75 (steak tacos), $2 (beef and chicken) during weekly Taco Tuesdays
  • Facebook: Jonesys Taco House Carter Lake
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

Top of page

Zip: 51526

For more than 25 years, Pink Poodle Steakhouse (633 Old Lincoln Highway in Crescent, Iowa) has served sock-hop nostalgia with delicious fare. It was a throwback even when it first opened. Nowadays, not much has changed at the Pink Poodle (including the onion rings, décor, and friendly service). All dinners are served with soup and salad, and come in hearty servings with a poodle…er…doggie…bag that is almost guaranteed to be going home with you.

  • Dish pick: prime rib at Pink Poodle Steakhouse
  • Price: $25 (12-oz. regular cut), $35 (cut-and-a-half), $48 (Diamond Jim cut)
  • Website: pinkpoodlesteakhouse.com
  • Chosen by: @OmahaEat

Top of page

Zip: 68005

In Japanese, “omakase,” translates to “I’ll leave it up to you.” Although pricey, the meal selection is worth considering at any renowned sushi restaurant—especially when the chef is Keen Zheng, who spent roughly 13 years training and working alongside several of the world’s top sushi chefs at Michelin-starred eateries in New York City. Before moving to Bellevue, Zheng worked under Daisuke Nakazawa (head apprentice of Jiro Ono, featured in the Netflix documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi). Make the reservation a day in advance for the dining experience at Zheng’s Umami (1504 Galvin Road S.), sit at the sushi bar to watch the master at work, and enjoy. Presentations and fish selection varies. The meal may consist of several dishes of individually presented delicacies.   

  • Dish pick: omakase at Umami 
  • Price: $75-$100 per person
  • Website: umamiasianne.com
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

Top of page

Zip: 68007 

If you’re visiting Bennington, roughly 10 miles outside of Omaha’s city limits, you’ll find there are only six or so options for dining. This includes fast food. So where should you dine in Bennington? The short answer is The Warehouse (15835 Center West Hadan Drive), which is known for their friendly service, late hours (they’re open until 11 p.m. or later), and wing sauces. 

  • Dish pick: wings with mango habanero sauce at The Warehouse
  • Price: $6.95 (six wings), $13.25 (12 wings), $24.75 (24 wings)
  • Website: benningtonwarehouse.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

Top of page

Zip: 68010

The Visitor’s Center Café at Boys Town (13603 Flanagan Blvd.) offers a basic menu of comfort foods when comfort is just what you’re after. With standard cafeteria-style dining, it’s a taste of home, without the dishes and chaos. Open weekdays and open to the general public, breakfast is served 6:45-9:45 a.m.; lunch is served 11 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.

  • Dish pick: western omelet at Boys Town Visitor’s Center Café
  • Price: $4.19
  • Website: boystown.org 
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

Top of page

Zip: 68022 

It’s easy to imagine Omaha is an island surrounded not by water, but by cornfields. An oasis of civilization surrounded by a rustic escape to homestead living. While that used to be an accurate portrayal, the cities and towns outside of Omaha’s limits have been growing, and now boast a burgeoning cultural scene for which you might want to make the drive. A day in Elkhorn isn’t complete without a stop at Bella Vita (2620 N. Main St.) for a hearty plate of tortellini di manzo, cheese tortellini tossed with sautéed onions, mushrooms, and beef tenderloin tips in a black peppercorn brandy cream sauce.

  • Dish pick: tortellini di manzo at Bella Vita Ristorante
  • Price: $19 (served dinner only)
  • Website: bellavitane.com
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke 

Top of page

Zip: 68028

Situated in Nebraska Crossing (21351 Nebraska Crossing Drive), Local Beer & Patio’s Gretna location brings variety to an area saturated with fast food. The freshest ingredients and the most artfully crafted beer pairings will be the highlight of a day of outlet-mall shopping. The menu’s sandwich choices are legit gourmet. Try the crispy mushroom sandwich: pretzel-breaded portobello mushroom, mayo, spinach, Swiss cheese, artichoke hearts, and tomato on a brioche bun. 

  • Dish pick: crispy mushroom sandwich at Local Beer & Patio
  • Price: $11.50
  • Website: localbeer.co
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

Top of page

Zip: 68046

Papillion has seen a lot of growth in the last several years, attracting families and businesses alike. As the restaurant scene catches up to the traffic, a front-runner has emerged in Ollie & Hobbes Craft Kitchen (310 E. Gold Coast Road). The establishment is known for its family-friendliness, and your child can count on being treated like a patron rather than simply patronized. Adults are treated to a 3-6 p.m. happy hour and a tantalizing menu that ranges from elegant pesto shrimp gnocchi to hearty pork schnitzel. Our expert chose the pan-seared salmon, which is served with garlic mashed potatoes, grilled asparagus, hollandaise, and fried leeks. Make it an Oscar (add crab) for just $5 more. 

  • Dish pick: pan-seared salmon at Ollie & Hobbes Craft Kitchen
  • Price: $19 ($24 with crab)
  • Website: ollieandhobbes.com
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

Top of page

Zip: 68059

The crispy Buffalo chicken sandwich at Trojan Tavern (167 Main St. in Springfield) is worth the drive. Served in the pub’s famous Ozzie Deluxe sauce, covered in melted Swiss cheese, onions, and tomato, this sandwich is then drizzled with ranch dressing to offer the perfect amount of cooling to the sticky heat between the buns. Also, look for the daily drink specials.

  • Dish pick: crispy Buffalo chicken sandwich at Trojan Tavern
  • Price: $9.95
  • Website: thetrojantavern.com
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

Top of page

Zip: 68064

Just outside of Omaha in Valley, Simply Delicious (215 N. Spruce St.) has a big name to live up to. Served with mashed potatoes and gravy, the pan-fried chicken will transport you to your mother’s dinner table. A dish that’s never quite as good when you make it for yourself, Simply Delicious adds a pinch of love to get it just right.

Top of page

Zip: 68069

If you’re into cheese, check out El Bee’s (3200 N. 240th St. in Waterloo). While the establishment has been open for decades, they have no official website or Facebook page, but fans of the Tex-Mex spot have maintained a page for them since 2009. Although known for their friendly service and strong margaritas, the fried ice cream takes the prize at this spot. Sweet and crunchy, it’s the perfect ending to the spicy and savory meal.

  • Dish pick: fried ice cream at El Bee’s
  • Price: $5.90 (cash only)
  • Facebook: El Bees
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke 

Top of page

Zip: 68102

It seems nearly impossible to choose a place to eat while wandering the Old Market’s endless options, and no matter where you finally stop, you’ll find something a local food artist has tortured themselves to present to perfection. When we finally held their feet to the fire, two of our consultant foodies chose not only the same establishment, but the same dish—Block 16’s Croque Garcon (available at 1611 Farnam St.), a one-third pound, locally-sourced burger with ham, a sunny-side-up egg, mustard, and truffle mayo. How good is the Croque Garcon? Ask Food Network host Alton Brown, who named it his favorite burger in America. 

  • Dish pick: Croque Garcon Burger at Block 16
  • Price: $8.25
  • Website: block16omaha.com
  • Chosen by: @Omaha.Feast and @EatOurWorld

Top of page

Zip: 68104 

Booming Benson has turned Maple Street into the place to be when you’re hungry. Your many moods are sure to be satisfied somewhere between the upscale Au Courant and the cozy Leo’s Diner. While choosing one dish from the many options was difficult, our team of foodies couldn’t seem to keep the name Ika Ramen (6324 Maple St.) out of their mouths. Whether it’s the ancient tradition, the painstaking broth process, or the warmth of a bowl of hot, sticky noodles, Ika Ramen takes great care with each dish, and Omaha has taken notice.

  • Dish pick: tonkotsu ramen at Ika Ramen and Izakaya
  • Price: $12
  • Website: ikaramenandizakaya.com 
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

Top of page

Zip: 68105

The picks for this zip were split, with almost an even number of votes for Greek Islands, Mother India, and Stirnella. So, we consulted Yelp to settle the score. Blame it on longevity, but the winner was the family-owned-and-operated Greek Islands (3821 Center St.). For 35 years, Laki “Bill” and George Sgourakis have offered their loyal patrons a taste of the Mediterranean and a seat at their table. The can’t-miss dish is the saganaki, a thin brick of warm baked cheese. It is brought to your table still sizzling from the oven, where it is doused with brandy and ignited to the festive cry of “Opa!” before being extinguished with the juice from a lemon slice and served on house bread.

  • Dish pick: flaming saganaki at Greek Islands
  • Price: $8.25
  • Website: greekislandsomaha.com
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68106

Jennifer Coco has gained a reputation for being one of Omaha’s best chefs. Her establishment, J. Coco (5203 Leavenworth St.), ran away with this nomination for the barbacoa short ribs, which are served with creamy corn risotto, tomatillo salsa, and queso fresco. 

  • Dish pick: barbacoa short ribs at J.Coco
  • Price: $27 (served dinner only)
  • Website: jcocoomaha.com
  • Chosen by: @Omaha.Feast 

Top of page

Zip: 68107

Taqueria Tijuana (5139 S. 24th St.) is known as one of the most traditional and authentic of Omaha’s Mexican restaurants. Reviewers praise the menudo, a labor-intensive dish consisting of tripe (beef stomach) and chili base. This dish is often made communally and is part of many family celebrations. Taqueria Tijuana believes that anytime you join them for dinner, it’s reason enough to celebrate with a warm bowl.

  • Dish pick: menudo at Taqueria Tijuana
  • Price: $7 (served weekends only)
  • Facebook: @TaqueriaTijuana402
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

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Zip: 68108

For their intense, three-day pizza crust-making process, ornately tiled wood-fired oven, and their handmade pastas, Via Farina (1108 S. 10th St.) was the uncontested winner in 68108. Just outside the Old Market, the restaurant is intimate and friendly, with a knowledgeable staff and extensive wine list. The majority of our foodie consultants chose Via Farina, but there was some disagreement about which dish deserved the crowning glory. After cross-referencing online reviews, the egg yolk raviolio beat out the bianco pizza for the top spot.

  • Dish pick: egg yolk raviolo at Via Farina
  • Price: $14
  • Website: goviafarina.com
  • Chosen by: @Omaha.Feast

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Zip: 68110

Get-N-Go Fish (1706 N. 24th St.) is only open Wednesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. How did a restaurant that’s only open half of the week (and closes before most people have even realized they forgot to thaw something for dinner and need to order take-out) make this list? Simple. The catfish. When you do something really well, you get to choose when you do it. 

  • Dish pick: whole catfish dinner at Get-N-Go Fish
  • Price: $12
  • Website: getngofish.com
  • Chosen by: @OmahaEat

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Zip: 68111

When Big Mama’s Kitchen (3223 N. 45th St.) lost owner and chef “Big Mama” Patricia Barron earlier this year, the family pulled together to maintain her legacy and mission: to bring you to her table. Her special-recipe fried chicken never lost its ability to get the family to sit down and hush, and the owners make sure you know that even though Big Mama is gone, you’re still family. The restaurant is currently located in the 68104 zip code, but is scheduled to move into the 68111 zip code (2112 N. 30th St.) after the Highlander Accelerator’s construction completes. 

  • Dish pick: oven-fried chicken at Big Mama’s Kitchen
  • Price: $9.29 (two pieces with one side), $10.89 (three pieces with one side); $11.99 (two pieces with two sides), $12.99 (three pieces with two sides)
  • Website: bigmamaskitchen.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402 

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Zip: 68112

A former food truck has emerged as one of Omaha’s hottest barbecue joints. Fat BBQ Shack (7440 N. 30th St.) still honors its former identity with heavy traffic from carry-out customers. But you might want to dine in, with blues music on the house speakers and wafting aromas of savory, sweet barbecue hot off the grill. Out of all the meat and sandwich options on the menu, the Shack Attack stands out. This mouth-watering behemoth comes with hand-cut fries topped with your choice of meat, barbecue sauce, shredded cheese, sour cream, ranch dressing, jalapeños, and chives. Don’t forget to share.

  • Dish pick: The Shack Attack at Fat BBQ Shack
  • Price: $8.99, add $1.49 for extra meat
  • Website: fatbbqshack.biz
  • Chosen by: @Omaha.Feast

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Zip: 68113

Offutt Air Force Base has its own zip code, but the meal options are limited to those with base access (or retired military and their families); however, Offutt does welcome the general public during certain special occasions. The public relations team at Offutt claims that Resa’s Famous Spaghetti at Peacekeeper Lanes has been a hit “for many, many years.” But for those lacking base access, there is the wonderful Korean House Restaurant (2413 Lincoln Road)—which is technically just outside Offut’s zip code in Bellevue—situated just beside the entry gate to the base. The restaurant looks a bit sketchy on the outside, but the tables are clean and the juicy kalbee (fried chicken bulgogi and beef bulgogi) is well-seasoned and comes with free kimchi side dishes. 

  • Dish pick: Resa’s Famous Spaghetti at Peacekeeper Lanes (for those with base access); house special at Korean House Restaurant (for those without base access)
  • Price: $6.25 full portion, $5 half portion (Resa’s Famous Spaghetti at Peacekeeper Lanes, served Wednesdays during lunch); $9.75 (bulgogi, chicken, kalbee, and drink at Korean House)
  • Facebook: @Offutt55fss & Korean House
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke (Peacekeeper Lanes) and @OmahaEat (Korean House Restaurant)

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Zip: 68114 

“El basha” was an Arabic term for “the elite society” during the Turkish and Ottoman empires. The unassuming atmosphere at El Basha restaurant (7503 Pacific St.) combined with the very reasonable prices may not strike you as “upper crust,” but the expertly balanced dishes and deep spices create the richest of flavor experiences. Our team chose the tender beef shawarma (which can also be made with chicken) from the extensive menu.

  • Dish pick: hummus with beef shawarma at El Basha
  • Price: $7.50
  • Website: elbashagrill.com
  • Chosen by: @OOOOmaha_Eats

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Zip: 68116

Wave Bistro (4002 N. 144th St.) boasts a large but focused menu of European- and Asian-inspired dishes created by chef/owner George Liao. His wife and co-owner, Connie, runs the front of the house, and the family’s warmth and charm are as much a reason to enjoy Wave Bistro as the exceptional food. 

  • Dish pick: shrimp roll with firecracker sauce at Wave Bistro
  • Price: $8.95 (served dinner only)
  • Website: wavebistrorestaurant.com
  • Chosen by: @Omaha.Feast

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Zip: 68117

Puerto Vallarta (4871 L St.) is a Tex-Mex party any day of the week. The restaurant serves various forms of meat and beans on tortillas and also has an exceptional salsa. But don’t miss the molcajetes: tender slices of ribeye, chicken, pork, shrimp, chorizo, scallops, or tilapia grilled with mushrooms, squash, Mexican onions, and nopal (cactus) served in a molcajete, a traditional grinding bowl. 

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Zip: 68118

An Omaha favorite for years, Pitch West (17808 Burke St.) offers house-cured meats, house-made pastas, and coal-fired pizza with an artistic touch. The Mia (pizza) features San Marzano tomato sauce, shredded mozzarella, fresh mozzarella, house-made fennel sausage, and pepperoni. 

  • Dish pick: The Mia at Pitch
  • Price: $20
  • Website: pitchpizzeria.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld and @Omaha.Feast

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Zip: 68122 

Chosen by three of our reviewers, each for a different dish, Mangia Italiana (6516 Irvington Road) has something for everyone. For a truly unique experience, get there in March and try their Italian Reuben pizza featuring an olive oil and fresh garlic base, roasted red pepper dressing, corned beef, sauerkraut, and provolone on Mangia’s signature crust.

  • Dish pick: pizza rosso (whole milk mozzarella, asiago, romano, parmesan, and provolone) at Mangia Italiana
  • Price: $13.99 (10-inch), $16.99 (13-inch), $19.99 (16-inch) 
  • Website: mangiaitaliana.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

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Zip: 68123

The most devilish spot on our list—Sinful Burger (4005 Twin Creek Drive)—has an offense to fit any occasion. Choosing from the sins themselves is a crime, but Lust has never steered anyone wrong. A half-pound patty smothered in basil pesto, bleu cheese, and from-scratch garlic mayo.

  • Dish pick: Lust at Sinful Burger
  • Price: $8.99
  • Website: sinfulburger.com 
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68124

This area boasts at least two spectacular steakhouses, but we chose The Drover (2121 S. 73rd St.). The steakhouse has made a science of seasoning and artistry of marinade. Your cut doesn’t receive the whiskey treatment or the secret spices until after you order it. At that point, it sits and waits until the optimal flavor window before being grilled to your specifications. Time-consuming? Yes. Worth it? Yes. (Tip: Try adding marinated mushrooms to the order).

  • Dish pick: whiskey steak sirloin at Drover (served dinner only)
  • Price: $26.95, add $8.50 for a bowl of mushrooms (enough for two or three people) 
  • Website: droverrestaurant.com
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68127

Korea Garden Restaurant (5352 S. 72nd St.) offers authentic Korean cuisine in Ralston. The restaurant provides a range of fresh dishes, from plates of stir-fried octopus to bowls of bibimbap or the classic beef bulgogi (a popular Korean dish of marinated beef slices in a special house sauce cooked over a tabletop grill). Also, make sure to savor the banchan—appetizer dishes such as kimchi, gimbap, japchae, and potatoes—and don’t be shy to ask for free refills on the sides. 

  • Dish pick: beef bulgogi at the Korean Garden Restaurant 
  • Price: $10.95
  • Website: koreangardenomaha.com
  • Chosen by: @OmahaEat

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Zip: 68128

The La Vista area food scene is expanding, but nothing can overcome Omaha’s affection for any dish named after, well, us. The Omaha Potato Casserole at Summer Kitchen Café (12010 Giles Road) features lean ground beef grilled with onions and mushrooms, American, Monterey jack and cheddar cheeses, sliced tomato, and pickle chips.

  • Dish pick: Omaha Potato Casserole at Summer Kitchen Café
  • Price: $9.99 (junior), $11.99 (regular), $13.00 (king), add $1.39 for an egg on top
  • Website: summerkitchen.net
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68130

Legacy Gyros (16920 Wright Plaza) had some stiff competition but still managed to win this vote. Reviewers mentioned the Turkish coffee—which isn’t easy to find in Omaha—and the pride the owner takes in his establishment as reasons to visit.

  • Dish pick: the classic gyro at Legacy Gyros
  • Price: $6.99
  • Website: legacygyros.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

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Zip: 68131

While Blackstone has no shortage of must-try eateries, Dante Pizzeria Napoletana (3852 Farnam St.) still manages to stand out for its quality ingredients, friendly staff, and fast-fine atmosphere. Choosing a single dish from the menu is akin to traveling with Virgil to the third circle of the inferno. Our reviewers failed to come to a consensus, so we executed judgment after much deliberation. The Diavolo was the eventual front-runner, with soppressata, link sausage, Calabrian chili, garlic, and mozzarella. It is truly sinful. 

  • Dish pick: Diavolo at Dante Pizzeria Napoletana
  • Price: $13
  • Website: dantepizzeria.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402 and @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68132 

Chef/owner Dario Schicke doesn’t serve food he wouldn’t serve his family, and his Northern Italian-inspired Avoli Osteria (5013 Underwood Ave.) is no exception. The seasonal menu always has something new to try, but the Bolognese bianco (pork and veal Bolognese) with toasted hazelnuts and pecorino Romano cheese on rigatoni won our reviewer’s vote.

  • Dish pick: Bolognese bianco (now simply called “rigatoni” on the menu) at Avoli Osteria
  • Price: $18
  • Website: avoliosteria.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402

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Zip: 68133

Some zip codes on the periphery of Omaha offer slim pickings aside from national franchise chains and fast food. The southern reaches of Papillion are a case in point. The Hop House Bar & Grill (11425 S. 72nd St.) offers an alternative. Now to choose from the most-delicious deep-fried morsel on the menu. Why not get it all? The sampler platter offers just this opportunity with mac & cheese bites, onion rings, jalapeño poppers, fried spicy pub pickles, and fried battered cauliflower.

  • Dish pick: sampler platter at The Hop House Bar & Grill 
  • Price: $12.99
  • Website: hophousebar.com
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

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Zip: 68134

A small spot with big, fat Greek portions, Jim and Jennie’s (3026 N. 90th St.) offers a vast menu filled with flavor. Loved for their generous dishes, authentic flavors, and warm atmosphere, Jim and Jennie’s was the destination of choice among our contributors, but the winning dish was up for debate. Ultimately, the stuffed eggplant papoutsakia came out on top. Eggplant filled with seasoned ground beef and béchamel, the dish is topped with kasseri cheese and served with Greek potatoes.  

  • Dish pick: stuffed eggplant papoutsakia at Jim and Jennie’s Greek Village
  • Price: $11 (served Saturdays only)
  • Website: jimandjennies.com 
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68135

Locally sourced, fun, and delicious, Over Easy (16859 Q St.) was the runaway winner for West O. While the establishment received hard nods for the corned beef hash, roasted portabello sandwich, and hash brown rounds, they won for their clever, house-made Pop Tarts. Choose between the seasonal fruit and Nutella, whether dining in or hitting the drive-through. Whatever you do, choose to pop by.

  • Dish pick: Pop Tarts at Over Easy
  • Price: $3.99
  • Website: overeasyomaha.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402 and @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68136

Ling’s Asian Cuisine (6909 S. 157th St.), previously known as “Vietnamese Restaurant,” sits humbly in a strip mall, just waiting to offer you a cup of iced Vietnamese coffee. You’re treated with the same hospitality whether you’re dining in or carrying out, and the menu offers most pan-Asian favorites, from pad thai to kung pao. The owners are originally from Taiwan and used to run a popular Chinese restaurant in Lincoln. They are bringing a special Taiwanese beef noodle soup to the menu in the future.

  • Dish pick: vermicelli rice noodle bowl at Ling’s Asian Cuisine
  • Price: $10
  • Website: lingsasiancuisine.com
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

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Zip: 68137 

Shirley’s Diner (13838 R Plaza) hosts a cult following for being as warm as a greasy spoon, minus the grease. A clean and well-managed establishment, the staff is warm and the décor is updated old-school. The comfort-classic praised by our foodie was the Country Sunrise. The homemade biscuit with a sausage patty, scrambled eggs, and creamy sausage gravy will keep you satisfied until lunch…tomorrow.

  • Dish pick: Country Sunrise at Shirley’s Diner
  • Price: $9.99
  • Website: shirleysdiner.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

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Zip: 68138

Azteca (9429 S. 142nd St.) is an easy stop off I-80 at 144th Street. The restaurant is a welcome place to rest for weary travelers, but locals make the stop for a variety of reasons. The generous portions, friendly staff, and the piña colada are all reason enough to pop in. Azteca offers a mostly basic Tex-Mex menu, but they do it well. The Azteca Burrito Supreme stands up to its name, showcasing the best of the basic. The monster starts off with rice, beans, and choice of ground beef, pork, or chicken in a flour tortilla, which is then smothered with burrito sauce and topped with cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, sour cream, and guacamole.

  • Dish pick: Azteca Burrito Supreme at Azteca Mexican Restaurant
  • Price: $9.95
  • Website: aztecaomaha.com
  • Chosen by: @EatOurWorld

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Zip: 68142

A fun spot to watch a game, grab a drink, or enjoy a casual dinner with friends, Ryan’s Food & Spirits (12221 Mary Plaza) does more than catering. Vegetarian and gluten-free options are available at the sports bar, with an extensive upscale menu available on the bistro side. The steak lafa wrap is a stand-out dish from an exceptional menu. The dish features herbed cream cheese, balsamic cranberry chutney, caramelized onions, and mixed greens with marinated grilled skirt steak.

  • Dish pick: steak lafa wrap at Ryan’s Food & Spirits
  • Price: $11.95
  • Website: rgcateringevents.com 
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402

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Zip: 68144

Several of our foodie consultants selected Little España as their Rockbrook favorite, possibly unaware that the establishment closed April 14. (Don’t tell them, OK?) The other name on their lips was Jaipur Indian Restaurant and Brewing Co. (10922 Elm St.). Delicious, from-scratch Indian fare is perfectly paired with their jalapeño ale (brewed on-site), friendly staff, and biryani. The winning dish was the chicken tikka madras, spiced boneless chicken in coconut milk sauce. 

  • Dish pick: chicken tikka madras at Jaipur Indian Restaurant and Brewing Co.
  • Price: $18.95
  • Website: jaipurindianfood.com
  • Chosen by: @FoodOmaha402

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Zip: 68147

Known for their signature “Toad” (a unique take on a fried taco), Nettie’s (7110 Railroad Ave.) is an old-school community favorite. The huevos con chorizo comes with two eggs scrambled with Mexican sausage, served with rice, beans, and tortillas.

  • Dish pick: huevos con chorizo at Nettie’s
  • Price: $14.95
  • Facebook: @NettiesFineMexicanFood
  • Chosen by: @TheWalkingTourists

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Zip: 68152

The Cabin Bar and Grill (9226 Mormon Bridge Road) is not fancy. But it is filling. Frontier pioneers would have approved of these portions. The prime rib is as big as the plate, and comes with a hearty serving of veggies and potatoes on the side. The gizzards are hand-breaded. But our pick comes from the menu’s “signature items,” the Triple Decker Reuben. The Cabin’s signature Reuben comes with home-cooked corned beef and the traditional fixings of sauerkraut and Thousand Island dressing, and is covered in melted Swiss cheese. 

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Zip: 68154

Generous portions of nutritious food in an eco-friendly environment make Greenbelly (210 N. 114th St.) a go-to destination for Omaha’s health-minded. Gluten-free, vegan, and vegetarian options abound in the green-themed eatery, which also offers compostable, corn-based containers and cutlery. The Thai salmon salad won out, with grilled salmon, mixed spring greens, green onion, cilantro, and peanuts in a sweet Thai chili sauce and a side of Thai peanut dressing.

  • Dish pick: Thai salmon salad at Greenbelly
  • Price: $9.99 (baby), $10.99 (regular)
  • Website: thegreenbelly.com
  • Chosen by: @OOOOmaha_Eats

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Zip: 68157

The kitschy and fun 80’s Snack Shack (4733 Giles Road) that opened early this year across from Bryan High is an unassuming spot you may not notice if you aren’t looking for it. A glass of strawberry water is a fun twist and a refreshing kick after any of the spicy dishes on the Mexican menu. 

  • Dish pick: pork tamales with two street tacos at 80’s Snack Shack
  • Price: $6
  • Facebook: @80sMunchies 
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

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Zip: 68164

Hiro 88 in West Omaha (3655 N. 129th St.), which famed Japanese architect Hiroshi Nakamura helped design, is a premier Omaha destination for high-end Japanese and pan-Asian cuisine. Three Instagrammers suggested separate dishes: tempura udon (soup with creamy noodles and crispy shrimp), the Golden Gate roll (with tuna, shrimp, crab mix, avocado, and cucumber), and the negi hamachi roll (with yellowtail and green onions). Call us biased, but we deferred to the judgment of the Instagrammer with Japanese heritage.

  • Dish pick: negi hamachi roll at Hiro 88
  • Price: $7.50
  • Website: hiro88.com
  • Chosen by: @OmahaEat

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Zip: 68178

Creighton University has its own zip code, but the campus dining options are restricted to students. In the 68102 zip code, across the street from campus, China Taste (1702 Cuming St.) is popular for affordable Chinese meals. The all-you-can-eat lunch buffet is only $7.75, and the steamed dumplings received rave reviews from Creighton students and staff. But when it comes to eating on campus, the Rev. Lorn Snow suggests the public drop by St. John’s Church for Mass at 10:30 a.m. Sundays, and stay for the free coffee and donuts after the service. 

  • Dish pick: Steamed dumplings at China Taste (next to campus); coffee and donuts at St. John’s Church (on campus)
  • Price: $4.65 (for six steamed dumplings); free (coffee and donuts)
  • Website: chinatasteomaha.com and stjohns-creighton.org
  • Chosen by: Sara Locke

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Do you have a local food Instagram account we should be following? Drop us a comment, and be sure to follow us back @OmahaMagazine. 

This article was printed in the July/August 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. 

March/April Instagram

March 1, 2018 by

Here are the nine images featured in our March/April issue. Include the hashtag #OmahaMagazine with your Instagram photos to be featured in the next issue of Omaha Magazine.

Follow Omaha Magazine on social media via Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Find us at @omahamagazine.

@sarxcasey

@rayheckert

@eternal_and_unchanging

@boipinoy

@cooper_333

@bartyandlalo

@sherry_591

@wanderrockphotography

@lolasblest

These photos were printed in the March/April 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Pigeon Bros

October 19, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann
Illustration by Pigeon Bros.

It’s like watching two parts of the same brain. When Jack Blanket and Ryan Showers are together, it’s just the two of them, taking turns finishing each other’s sentences and stories. Their words flow back and forth, forming a single curse-word-laden stream of consciousness. But that’s not to say these brothers are free from a little sibling rivalry.

“Stop. Stop. STOP. Don’t draw on my drawing,” Blanket says as his pencil glides over paper, doodling out shaded shapes, while Showers makes a move to add his own creative contribution.

“I wouldn’t…” Showers begins.

“Wouldn’t be an ass? Yes, yes, you would,” Blanket continues.

Believe it or not, this exchange, like most of their conversations, is all said with deadpan, sarcastically saccharine love. To them, calling one another an ass is a compliment. While the duo play brothers, friends, and roomies in life, they’re yin and yang in the world of local Omaha art—Blanket an accomplished stop motion animator and Showers an eccentric and eclectic illustrator.

“As far as I know, we’ve always been drawing and creating,” says Blanket, the younger sibling by approximately one year. “There’s always been paper and pencil around.”

Born and raised across the river in Council Bluffs, Blanket and Showers are just two of eight siblings, each one living in different parts of the country, all of them dabbling in art either full-time or for fun. However, given their upbringing, it’s no surprise the family is now made up of everything from illustrators and animators to video game creators and programmers. They were homeschooled by their mother, who based her curriculum largely on creative expression. Their father illustrated.

Even though their childhood was awash in arts, crafts, doodles, and drawings, the two brothers didn’t graduate high school as mini Monets. It was through years of self-learning and discovery that their artistic talents began to bloom.

Blanket taught himself to animate through online tutorials. After all, who needs a fancy-shmancy liberal arts degree when you’ve got Google and YouTube as professors? Years of plugging and playing and numerous “crashed crappy computers” later, Blanket acquired the skills to land freelance animation work.

He’s made several animated games and music videos for local musicians and labels, One of his favorites was for a Chicago-based hip-hop and soul group, Sidewalk Chalk. Though simple, his flashing red, white, and black drawings in the video for their song “Dig” helps bring to life the message behind the lyrics, which details the effect media has on the public’s perception of police violence.

“To create it, you just go step-by-step, line-by-line, translating lyrics to images,” Blanket says. “Three minutes might really be three months of work.”

As for his artistic name, a high school girlfriend’s mother created it in an instant years ago. She said she knew too many Nathans, his real name, and chose to call him Jack Blanket instead. More than a decade later and the moniker has survived, further separating his work and artistic identity from his brother.

“We’re cut from the same cloth but we really are very different, both personally and with our art,” Blanket says.

One glance at their work and any viewer would agree. Showers steers clear of animation, instead creating detailed drawings, often sparse in color but big in imagination. Haunting images of monsters, animals in human clothes, and cartoonish people, he’s done it all.

“My process is much slower than my brother’s. I’ll start by making a rough skeleton and then sit on it for a really long time,” Showers says. “Music, my medicine, is always a huge catalyst to get me going.”

Beyond the musical styling of bands like King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, Showers is inspired by anime and fashion magazines, which he spent hours copying and drawing to perfect his craft.

“Life is f***ed sometimes, so I strive to create work that takes people somewhere else,” Showers says. “The potency of expanding imagination is so valuable. Maybe my pieces help with that.”

While he avoids collaborations, including with his brother, Showers aspires to create pop-up shops around town that feature work from a variety of local creators. For now, he shows pieces for sale in Caffeine Dreams and uses his Instagram as an online portfolio to market himself and gain more work. By displaying animations on YouTube, Blanket harnesses the power of social media.

“Artists need to have an online presence now,” Blanket says. “As a low-level artist, you do a lot better putting yourself out there and responding to your audience through these mediums.”

When they’re not turning news feeds into galleries, the two brothers share an apartment but hardly see one another. Showers admittedly disappears for days, often to look high and low for inspiration, even sifting through dumpsters and exploring vacant buildings. Since art isn’t always a field filled with money, especially for up-and-coming creators, the two spend even more time apart working odd jobs to pay rent.

“We’ve grown accustomed to a humble lifestyle,” Showers says. “I’m willing to wash dishes for a living if it means I can have an imagination.”

So when they get together, it’s a nostalgic celebration. On a particularly warm June day, the siblings got the chance to share an afternoon on the back patio of Caffeine Dreams. Showers veiled his eyes from the gleaming sun with oversized sunglasses while Blanket embraced the warmth, sitting outside the shade with his painted fingernails gleaming in the light. Just as with art, the two take different paths, each enjoying the summer day in their own way.

While you may not see pom-poms at their sides as they sip coffee and share memories, these two really are one another’s biggest cheerleaders, bonded by blood and a love for all things creative.

“Our fields are so highly different,” Showers says. “In my mind, there is no competition, no rivalry, no…”

“No reason not to be supportive,” Blanket finishes. “There’s just mutual respect.”

Visit instagram.com/thee_owl or instagram.com/score6 to view more of Pigeon Brothers’ art.

This article appears in the September/October 2017 edition of Encounter Magazine.

Pigeon Brothers

From The Editor

February 23, 2017 by

B2B Magazine started 2017 by highlighting the many successful women in business around Omaha, and this issue, we bring you the best of the city for business needs.

This contest is a bit different from the Best of Omaha, where the ballot is published online so anyone in the community can choose their favorites. In the Best of B2B contest, the winners are nominated on ballots printed in the 20,000 copies of the winter issue. Each issue of the magazine contained a ballot—a chance for readers to vote on favorite businesses that cater to the local business community (for example: business lunch, carpet cleaning, and much more).

How many of us can truly say we love our work? I do, actually. I look forward to coming to the office. A big part of this is that I work with an incredible team of creatives and salespeople, and one lizard. Yes, lizard—Spike the bearded dragon. Spike came to visit a couple of years ago when the publisher and his family left for Europe, and he has been with us since. He’s docile, usually sitting under his heat lamp hanging around. Sometimes when I am really feeling overwhelmed, I walk downstairs to his aquarium and watch him for a moment, sunning himself, enjoying life.

In the spring issue, we bring you the story of Envoy, which keep cats, dogs, and even a hedgehog in the office. Employees keep treats for the fur-ployees at their desks, and if one of the pets turns up missing, the whole office helps in finding their special friend.

What about you? Do you have a pet in your office? Does your office allow you to bring your pets to work? Or do you vote nay to keeping or having pets in the office? Does the fur or the smell bother you? Follow us on social media and join the conversation (@omahamagazine on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram).

We also have other incredible articles in this issue. Like many forms of traditional media, radio is looking for alternate ways to increase revenue. NRG Media has found new business opportunities through concerts.

Ride-sharing has become a popular trend in the past several years. While people are more prone to call for an Uber in a coastal city where the cost of owning a car is prohibitive, Omaha does offer alternatives to jumping into your own vehicle when you want to go somewhere. One of those alternatives is Zipcar. This car-sharing service allows users to access one of several fleet vehicles in the area by reserving a time and date for a car. The vehicle is then available for the reserver to use by the hour or the day.

And if you need to go outside of the city, traveling to Silicon Valley just became a bit easier by flying on United Airlines’ nonstop flights between Omaha and San Francisco.

This issue of B2B, like all issues, proves to be an adventure. I hope you enjoy it.

Daisy Hutzell-Rodman is associate editor of B2B, a publication of Omaha Magazine LTD. She can be reached at daisy@omahamagazine.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This letter was printed in the Spring 2017 edition of B2B.

 

Joan Lukas

January 13, 2017 by
Photography by Ani Luxe Photography

This native advertisement appears in the Winter 2017 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/b2b_0217_125/40

Lukas Partners president and owner Joan Lukas says the company has been woman-owned since its founding in 1973. It provides smart public relations and fund development solutions that are continually recognized with PRSA Paper Anvil and Best of B2B awards.

“Women are the world’s most powerful consumers, as they drive 80 percent of all consumer purchases,” Lukas says. As the largest public relations and fund development firm in the Midlands, Lukas Partners helps clients engage women and other key audiences in many ways, including effective blogger relations, news media placements, popular events, capital campaigns, and other successful communication strategies and tactics.

Expertise in strategic communication planning, news media relations, social media, fund development, event management, and research help clients engage audiences through award-winning public relations and fund development. The firm helps reach the right audiences with the right messages.

lukaspartners.com

LukasPartners2