Tag Archives: recreation

Nettles, and Ivy, and Ticks—Oh My!

April 28, 2017 by

Christine Jacobsen likes to see parents taking their kids outside. “There’s more of a risk to keeping them inside,” she says, citing obesity and other problems. Jacobsen, the education specialist for the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resource District, often heads summer camp programs and outdoor field trips for students. Jacobsen says she took her own children outside frequently “from the get-go.” When her children were infants, her husband and she would take them on hikes in carriers. Her children now appreciate the outdoors. Jacobsen says that the more parents can get their kids outdoors and learning about their natural world, the better.

Many parents fear what dangers may lurk outside. Jacobsen says, “Here in Nebraska, especially in eastern Nebraska, there’s really not a lot to be worried about,” noting that any venomous snakes, such as rattlesnakes, are restricted to western Nebraska. However, one should learn to identify and avoid minor perils such as nettles, poison ivy, ticks, and mosquitoes.

Nettles

Jacobsen advises that nettles are a common plant hazard. She describes nettles as a woodland underbrush, about 2-3 feet tall, with green “sawtooth leaves.” She says they are invasive and often establish in disturbed places such as areas that have been mowed or tilled over. “They move in and take over an area,” she says. The bottoms of the leaves contain irritating hairs that cause redness and itching, she says. Jacobsen’s nettles remedy in a pinch: “put mud on it.” She also advises wearing long pants when in the woods.

Poison Ivy

Like nettles, poison ivy irritates the skin. Look for “mitten shaped” “leaves of three,” says Jacobsen. She also says poison ivy is typically seen in the woodlands, where it grows as a short, understory plant and as vines. “It’s the first vine to turn red in the fall,” says Jacobsen.

Reactions to poison ivy can include blisters, inflammation, and swelling. Jacobsen says the oil in the leaves is the cause of these reactions, and that the oil can be transmitted. Jacobsen’s remedy: washing the site to lift the oil. She advises seeking medical advice for severe reactions.

Ticks

Ticks are another nuisance. Jacobsen says that although the incidence of tick-spread lyme disease (typically by deer ticks) is low in Nebraska, hikers should be mindful of ticks. These arachnids are tear-drop shaped and have small heads. Dog ticks are generally larger and light brown with an “hourglass shape” on the back. “Deer ticks,” she says, “are like pepper—they’re tiny.” Use insect spray as a precaution. She acknowledges that many parents don’t want to put DEET on their children, but Jacobsen recommends it, noting that after being outdoors children should take a shower to wash it off and to look for ticks that may have attached.

Mosquitoes

Nobody likes mosquitoes, but they can be avoided. Jacobson advises using DEET to avoid them as well. She says mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn.Mosquito bites can be irritating. “Don’t scratch,” she says, noting that breaking them open can introduce infections. Jacobsen recommends cold packs and calamine lotion for bad bites.

Even with these minor hazards lurking outdoors, it is worthwhile to let children explore nature. They will form happy memories of hiking in the woods, playing in the mud, or catching their first fish, and develop an appreciation for active living.

This article was printed in the Summer 2017 edition of Family Guide.

The Johnsons

April 27, 2017 by
Photography by Sarah Lemke

Distant from the city lights and engulfed by nature, one might feel overwhelmed by the unidentified bustle in the bushes, the sticky humidity, and the irritating mosquitoes. For the Johnson family, it means they’re all together, and it’s their home away from home.

Ransom and Julie Johnson have taken countless camping trips with their kids.

The couple upgraded their tent size as they welcomed their children over the years. The Johnson clan—which includes Grace, 9; Ella, 11; Nate, 19; and Merci, 27—camps together several times each summer.

Ransom and Julie agree that the family time spent outdoors together gives their curious children a much-needed chance to disconnect and explore.

“It’s good to see them get out and open up their minds. Instead of saying, ‘Oh entertain me,’ it’s ‘What am I going to find to do?’ And they always find something,” Ransom says.

“They might be knee-deep in mud and their clothes are all wet, but it doesn’t matter,” Julie adds.

The family spent several days last year on a camping trip to Yankton, South Dakota. More often, however, the family spends long summer weekends at Two Rivers State Recreation Area in Waterloo, Nebraska. Although it is only a 30-minute drive, the couple says it is the perfect distance from home.

“One thing that always amazes the kids is how much they can see once they get out of the lights of town. How much more brilliant the stars are,” Ransom says.

When everyone feels cooped up in the house, and the kids are bickering with one another, the short escape does a lot of good for their family.

“You get them out to the campsite for two-three days and they don’t have anything to fight about anymore,” Ransom says. “They have to rely on each other. They get along with each other.”

Ransom has been camping for as long as he can remember.

He introduced Julie to the leisure activity when they were dating. While they started out with a two-person tent, they’ve accumulated quite the camping haul.

Over the years, they’ve built up a supply of two 10-person tents, a couple of smaller tents, a canoe, and many pieces of cooking equipment. Their supplies range from coffee pots, to coolers, to Dutch ovens.

Most of the time, their camping meals consist of burgers, sandwiches, or hot dogs. Other times the family eats fruit, or chips and other junk food.

“It kind of just depends on how much planning and preparation is involved,” Julie says. “Sometimes we just grab what’s in the cupboard and go.”

The spontaneity, Julie says, is what makes the trips so memorable.

“The kids can be sitting, reading, and then they see something,” Ransom adds. “And all of the sudden they’re off to investigate whatever leaf blew by, or whatever it may be.”

Much of the children’s love for nature can be attributed to their respective involvement in Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts.

The couple started their son young by not only signing him up for Cub Scouts while he was in the first grade, but serving as the group leaders for a few years. Their son, now 19, participated in Boy Scouts, working his way through the ranks to earn the title of Eagle Scout.

The two younger girls, ages 9 and 11, have been involved with Girl Scouts from a young age. Julie helps out as a co-leader with both troupes.

“It’s important,” Ransom says. “It lets kids explore so many different things … in scouting you can touch on everything from cooking and sewing to rock climbing, robotics, and 50-mile hikes.”

Ransom himself was a Boy Scout. From the parents’ perspective, their kids’ involvement in the programs has been a crucial part of their growing up.

“It teaches them responsibility to the community and to the family,” Ransom says.

The Boy Scouts troop the Johnsons’ son attended camped 11 times per year—sometimes more. Beginning in the fifth grade, they took an annual week-long camping trip to Camp Geiger near St. Joseph, Missouri. There, the boys would stay in tents and earn merit badges.

The Girl Scouts also have the opportunity for an annual overnight wilderness experience where they stay overnight, hike, shoot archery, and take in the nature.

“It’s really about slowing down,” Julie says. “When we’re hustling and we’re talking, we miss seeing the deer or the wild turkey. I try and encourage the girls to just be observers of nature.”

It is plain to see where the love for outdoors stems from in the Johnson family. All the family members appreciate the little moments in the camping, hiking, and memories made on their highly anticipated summer adventures.

This article was printed in the Summer 2017 edition of Family Guide.

l-r: Ella, 11, and Grace, 9, spend quality time in their family tent.

Calendar of Events: January/February 2014

December 18, 2013 by

ART AND MUSEUM EXHIBITS

From the Collection: Jun Kaneko’s Special Project – Fremont Dangos
Through January 10 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St.
This exhibit brings together for the first time a set of six 11-foot ceramic pieces created by Jun Kaneko known as “Dangos.” The exhibit will also include documentation of the art-making process including sketches, photographs, and video. M-F/9am-5pm; Sat/1-5pm. Free. 402-341-3800 – thekaneko.org

Celebrate Black History on Stamps
January 1- March 1 at Boys Town, 137th & W. Dodge Rd.
View stamps of famous Black Americans on display at the Leon Myers Stamp Center, located in the Boys Town Visitor Center. M-F/8am-5pm; Sat/9am-4pm; Sun/11am-4pm. Free. 402-498-1141 – boystown.org

Lossy Group Exhibition
Through April 1 at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, 724 S. 12th St.
Curator Stephani Syjuco brings together six former Bemis Center Artists-in-Residence. Their sculptural and image-based surrogates call into question the notion of ‘presence’ and use their unfaithfulness as a way to reorganize meaning and symbolism in the world around them. Tu-Sat/11am-5pm. Free. 402-341-7130 – bemiscenter.org

American Muralist Louis Grell
January 20 – February 20 at Weber Fine Arts Building, 6001 Dodge St.
Explore the works of Louis Grell, a 20th century painter and muralist born in Council Bluffs in this first retrospective exhibition.  M-Th/10am-3pm. Free. 402-554-2796 – unomaha.edu

Bill Hoover and Jerome Dubas, Mixed Media & Ceramics Exhibition
January 27-March 7 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnam St.
Bill Hoover has been making art and music in Omaha for over 25 years, beginning by exhibiting his oil-based drawings at Lisa’s Radial Café. He has had over 14 solo shows and exhibitions around the country. Jerome Dubas is a faculty member of the arts department at Grand Island Senior High and teaches a ceramics course at Hastings College. His early ceramic inspiration came from his family’s farm near the hills of Fullerton. M-F/8am-5pm. Free. 402-595-2122 – nebraskaartscouncil.org

Poseidon and the Sea
February 8-March 11 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.
The realms of Poseidon encompassed virtually every aspect of life in the ancient Mediterranean world, from mythology and religious cult to daily activities.  This exhibition explores each of these three domains through more than 100 pieces of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman art produced over more than a millennium. Tu,W,F, Sat/10am-4pm; Th/10am-8pm; Sun/12-4 pm.  $10 general public adults, free for Joslyn members, ages 17 & under, and college students with ID. 402-340-3300 – joslyn.org

 Polar Obsession with Photographer Paul Nicklen
February 18 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Paul Nicklen’s award-winning photography takes audiences on a visual journey through the vast polar regions of our planet and gives them a glimpse of the animals that call it home.  7:30pm. $20-$40. 402-345-0202 – omahaperformingarts.org

CONCERTS

Life is Cool with the Brigadiers, All Young Girls Are Machine Guns
January 3 at The Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St.
Life is Cool is a local band that piles on the theatrics for a fun-filled dance party.  A seven-person band that mixes funk, pop rock, and a fog machine, their live shows give audiences something to celebrate. $7. 9 pm. 402-345-7569 – theslowdown.com

Out of Control: Madness, Passion and Obession
January 12 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Conductor Ernest Richardson leads the Omaha symphony through a vivid portrayal of psychological thrills, burning desire, and destructive jealousy against the beautiful backdrop of the Joslyn Art Museum. 2 pm. $33. 402-340-3300 – joslyn.org

ELVIS Lives – The Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Event
January 11 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
This multimedia musical journey across Elvis’ life features finalists from Elvis Presley Enterprises’ annual worldwide Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest, as well as iconic imagery from the Graceland archives. 8 pm. $35-$80. 402-345-0606 – ticketomaha.com

George Strait with Eric Church
January 17 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
George Strait’s “Cowboy Rides Away Tour” will be his last. Known as “The King of Country,” Strait has had 60 No.1 hits, more than any other artist.  Joining Strait is Eric Church, who is hot off of two No. 1 singles—“Drink in My Hand” and “Springsteen.” 7:30 pm. $75.50-$96.50 plus fees. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

Behind the Mask: The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber
February 1 – 2 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Enjoy music from some of composer Andrew Lloyd Webber’s biggest hits, including Phantom of the Opera, Jesus Christ Superstar, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and Cats.  Sat/8pm; Sun/2pm. $19-$83. 402-345-0202 – omahaperformingarts.org $25-70. ticketomaha.com

The Expendables
February 3 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St.
Originally from California, the Expendables have been making waves since 1997 with their West Coast style, blending reggae, punk rock, and more. 7 pm. $15. 402-884-5353 – waitingroomlounge.com

Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio
February 7 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Called the forefather of “acid jazz,” Dr. Lonnie Smith’s music draws inspiration from a little bit of everything—funk, jazz, hip-hop, and dance music—with a sound that will keep audiences wanting more. 8 pm. $30. 402-345-0606 – ticketomaha.com

Evening at the Oscars
February 8 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Stroll the red carpet to hear iconic music from Academy Award®-winning films, including Gone with the Wind, The Godfather, and Titanic. 8 pm. $25-70. 402-345-0202. ticketomaha.com

Justin Timberlake
February 10 at the CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St.
One of this generation’s most-celebrated entertainers, Justin Timberlake, is dominating the global charts with the release of his acclaimed new album, The 20/20 Experience. Timberlake will bring his electrifying live show to fans with a worldwide tour that will span the globe from North America, Europe, Australia, and South America. This is the Grammy® and Emmy® award-winning artist’s first headlining tour in six years. Tickets from $47 to $177 1-800-745-3000 centurylinkcenteromaha.com

Count Basie Orchestra
February 14 at Holland Performing Arts Center,1200 Douglas St.
The Count Basie Orchestra and New York Voices reunite nearly 20 years after their Grammy® Award-winning collaboration to once again combine the best of big band sounds and vocal jazz. 
8 pm. $65-$25. 402-345-0606 – ticketomaha.com

Winter Dreams
February 16 at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 324 S. Jackson St., Papillion
Orchestra Omaha presents the winners of their annual Young Artists Competition. 3 pm. Free. 402-681-4791 – orchestraomaha.org

Mardi Gras Cabaret
February 27 at Glo Lounge, 3201 Farnam St.
The Joey Gilizia Trio will present some of the upbeat and celebratory Latin sounds inspired by Carnival in Rio.  Presented by St. Cecelia Cathedral.  Includes dinner and a cash bar. 6:30 pm. $50. 402-558-3100 ext. 3007 – cathedralartsproject.org

FAMILY

Mozart’s Missing Memory
January 19 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
A part of the Omaha Symphony’s Family Series, this show gives kids a fun introduction to a classical music genius. Featuring a mix of humor and music, this show promises laughs for all ages. 2 pm. $12. 402-345-0202 – ticketomaha.com

Festival of the Americas – Programs 1 and 2
January 24 – 25 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Thomas Wilkins (conductor), Alyson Cambridge (soprano), and Oren Fader (guitar) explore the diversity of the Americas with two programs evoking the colorful landscapes and vibrant cultures of the New World. The January 24th concert consists of the first program, while the January 25th concert features the second program. F-Sat/8pm. $27-$80 plus fees. 402-345-0606 – omahasymphony.org

Nickelodeon’s The Fresh Beat Band
January 26 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q. St., Ralston
Nickelodeon’s The Fresh Beat Band is a live-action music series that teaches preschoolers about music appreciation and how to express their feelings through movement, song, and music. 5 pm. $39.50-$159.50 plus taxes & fees. 800-440-3741 – homepridetix.com

Sid the Science Kid Live!
January 30 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
Based on the Emmy®-nominated PBS Kids television show, Sid the Science Kid, this live show takes kids on an interactive journey to explore the world alongside their favorite characters.  Arrive an hour early for a Kids Zone featuring coloring, face painting, balloon artists, and more.7 pm. $25. 402-345-0606 – ticketomaha.com

The Grocer’s Goblin and the Little Mermaid
January 31 – February 16 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St.
Two classic Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales come to life in this inventive world premiere, combining original puppetry and projections to explore intertwined tales of loving, longing, and growing up. Best for ages 5-11. F/7pm, Sat/2pm & 5pm; Sun/2pm. $18 non-members, free members. 402-345-4849 – rosetheater.org

Things That Go!
Through April 14 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St.
Explore all the things that make the world go round in the upcoming special exhibit, Things That Go! In this exhibit, kids will move full speed into the idea of “GO” in everything from vehicles, water, energy, and more. Sun/1-5pm; Tu-F/10am-4pm; Sat/9am-5pm. Free members & under 24 months. $2 in admission to regular admission price adults, seniors, and children. 402-342-6164 – ocm.org

RECREATION

Monster Jam
January 3- 5 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way
This “smashing” event features 10,000 pounds of monster trucks battling it out in both racing and an audience-scored “freestyle” competition. F/7:30 pm; Sat/2 & 7:30pm; Sun/2pm. $37 adults, $24 ages 2-12, free 2 & under. 712-323-0537 – midamericacenter.com

Cathedral Flower Festival
January 25-26 at St. Cecilia Cathedral, 701 N. 40th St.
This year’s 29th annual Cathedral Flower Festival is inspired by South Pacific, and will bring some tropical beauty to Omaha during the cold winter.

Bill O’Reilly:  No Spin Zone
January 31 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St., Ralston
A provocative face for over 30 years, Fox News commentator and journalist Bill O’Reilly brings his “no-spin” approach to the most current events and issues in our world. 8 pm. $79-$250 plus taxes and fees. 402-934-6291 
– homepridetix.com

Nebraska Buck ‘N Bird Classic
January 31 – February 2 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
You can find all kinds of outdoor recreation under one roof at the Buck ’N Bird Classic, a three-day expo on all things outdoors. Includes a rock climbing wall, seminars on hunting and fishing, and more. F/3-9pm; Sat/9am-7pm; Sun/10am-4pm. $10 adults, $5 ages 7-12, free ages 7 & under. 402-707-4885 – nebraskabigbuckclassic.com

48th Annual Omaha Home and Garden Show
February 6 – 9 at Century Link Center, 455 N. 10th St.
Spring comes early with Omaha’s largest showcase of landscaping, home, gardens, and outdoor living.  Th/5-9pm; F/11am-9pm; Sat/11 am-8pm; Sun/11am-5pm. $8 adults, $4 ages 5-12, free ages 5 & under. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

Lauritzen Gardens Valentine’s Day Dinner
February 14 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St.
Have a “green” Valentine’s day this year among the beautiful flowers and plants of the Lauritzen Gardens. Guests will receive a three-course meal and a glass of wine. Seating available from 6 pm-9pm. $50 per person. 402-346-4002 – lauritzengardens.org

Swing Under the Wings
February 14 at Strategic Air & Space Museum, 28210 W. Park Hwy.
The Strategic Air & Space Museum presents their 2014 Hangar Dance, this year with a 1940s theme.  Come dressed in your best vintage clothing and costumes to relive memories of a bygone era. 
7 pm. See website for ticket information.  
402-944-3100 – sacmuseum.org

THEATRE

The Church Basement Ladies in A Mighty Fortress is Our Basement
January 17 at Iowa Western Community College, 2700 College Road, Council Bluffs
The Church Basement Ladies are back in the fourth and latest installment in this popular series of musical comedies. The year is 1960, a reformation is underway, and once again the Church Basement Ladies are required to face change head-on. 2 pm & 8 pm. $35 adults, $31 seniors and students. 712-388-7140 – artscenter.iwcc.edu

Having Our Say-The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years
January 17 – February 9 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
Meet sisters Sadie and Bessie Delaney in this biographical, two-person play. At ages 101 and 103, these resilient African-American sisters have lived through the historic Civil Rights Movement, Jim Crow laws, and women’s suffrage. W-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. $35 Adults, $21 Students. 402-553-0800 
– omahaplayhouse.com

 Martha Graham Dance Company
January 26 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. The Martha Graham Dance Company celebrates the vision of its namesake by performing her 1944 work Appalachian Spring. 
7pm. $20-$50. 402-335-0606 – ticketomaha.com

Dvorák’s Rusklka – The Met: Live in HD
February 6 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
The great Renée Fleming returns to one of her signature roles, singing the enchanting “Song to the Moon” in Dvorák’s soulful fairy-tale opera. This live telecast also includes a prelude talk from Opera Omaha.  11:55 am. $20 Opera Omaha and Film Streams members, $24 general admission, $10 students with valid school ID.  402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Next to Normal
February 7- March 16 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
The 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama winner, Next to Normal is a deeply moving rock musical and raw account of a family dealing with mental illness, tragedy, and the realities of modern society. Disclaimer: contains strong language and adult situations and is intended for mature audiences. Th-Sat/7:30 pm; Sun/2pm. $35 adults, $21 students. 402-553-0800 
– omahaplayhouse.com

Duets
February 8 at Ballet Nebraska’s Encore Performance Space, 2819 S. 125th Ave. Part of Ballet Nebraska’s “Encore Series,” this fresh mix of partnered dance works includes a discussion with artists and refreshments. 7:30 pm. $25. 402-541-6946 – balletnebraska.org

Opera Omaha’s Agrippina
February 14 and February 16 at the Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
Delve into the sordid private lives of some of history’s most notorious figures. Agrippina is the ambitious and seductive wife of Emperor Claudius, who through shocking and often darkly comic machinations places her volatile teenage son, Nero, on the throne. Jeweled with Handel’s glorious melodies, Agrippina is the composer at his most theatrically visceral and musically stunning. Tickets from $19 to $99 402-345-0606 –operaomaha.com

 Million Dollar Quartet
February 18 – February 23 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
This Tony Award®-wining Broadway musical draws inspiration from the electrifying true story of the recording session that brought together rock ‘n’ roll icons Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins for the first and only time. Tu-Th/7:30 pm; F/8pm; Sat/2pm & 8pm; Sun/1:30 pm & 7pm. $95-$30. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.com

Gnit
February 20 – March 15 at Blue Barn Theatre. 614 S. 11th St.
Loosely based on Henrik Ibsen’s Peer Gynt, this American version focuses on self-involved Peter Gnit, who kidnaps a young women on her wedding day, falls in love with someone else, and embarks on a global journey. $25 adults, $20 students. Th-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/6pm; no show Feb. 23rd and Mar. 16th. 402-345-1576 – bluebarn.org

Death by Design
February 26-March 1 & March 6-8 at Weber Fine Arts Building, 6001 Dodge St.
What happens when you mix the brilliant wit of Noel Coward with the intricate plotting of Agatha Christie? You have a delightful and mysterious mash-up of two of the greatest English writers of all time in this zany and macabre murder mystery. 7:30 pm. $15 general adult tickers, $10 UNO faculty and staff, senior citizens, and military. $5 students with ID and TAG member card. 402-554-7529 – unotheatre.com

Ella
February 28 – March 30 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
Ella is the powerhouse story and musical revue of iconic jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald. As this legend prepares for her most challenging performance, she recalls her life’s tribulations and how she found solace in music. W-Sat/7:30 pm; Sat/2pm. Ticket Prices TBA. 402-553-0800 – omahaplayhouse.com

Jackie & Me
February 28 – March 16 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St.
With the help of a vintage baseball card and a little bit of magic, average boy Joey Stoshack travels back to 1947 and meets Jackie Robinson, the first African-American to play in the major leagues. Best for ages 6-13. F/7pm; Sat/2 & 5 pm; Sun/2pm. $18 non-members, free members. 402-345-4849 
– rosetheater.org

 

Calendar of Events: November/December 2013

October 24, 2013 by

ART AND MUSEUM EXHIBITS

Featured Artists Akers, Fetters, and Gaines
Through November 24 at Artists Cooperative Gallery Ltd, 405 S. 11th St.
New works by mixed media artist Sean Akers, painter Joan Fetter, and weaver Agneta Gaines. Tu-Th/11am-5pm; F-Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-6pm. Free admission. 402-342-9617 – 
artistsco-opgallery.com

MathAlive!
Through January 5 at Strategic Air & Space Museum, 28210 W. Park Hwy.
Exhibit showing the real math behind what kids love most—video games, sports, fashion, music, robotics, and more. Daily/10am-5pm. $12 adults, $11 seniors & military, $6 ages 4-12. 402-944-3100 – sasmuseum.com

Goose Bumps! The Science of Fear
Through January 5 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St.
Test yourself against four common fears. Observe how fear changes and learn simple ways to combat stress. Tu/10am-8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; Sun/1-5pm. $9 adults, $7 seniors (62+), $6 ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 402-444-5071 – durhammuseum.org

Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection
Through January 5 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.
A selection of paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from a historic gift pledged to the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2010 by Emily Fisher Landau. Her collection features some of the most influential artists of the 20th century, including Andy Warhol, Glenn Ligon, Sherrie Levine, Agnes Martin, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, John Baldessari, Kiki Smith, and Ed Ruscha. Tu-W/10am-4pm; Th/10am-8pm; F-Sat/10am-4pm; Sun/12-4pm. Free admission. 402-342-3300 – joslyn.org

American Royalty: The Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Scholarship and Coronation Ball
November 2 – January 19 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St.
Over 200 years after declaring independence from the British monarchy, Americans continue to be entranced by royalty, and this exhibit aims to examine this fascination by looking at the fictional coronation of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben through a historical lens. Tu/10am-8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; Sun/1-5pm. $9 adults, $7 seniors 62+, $6 ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 402-444-5071 – durhammuseum.org

First Thursday Art Talk
November 7 & December 5 at Bemis Center of Contemporary Arts, 724 S. 12th St.
Current artists-in-residence give presentations or performances of their work and discuss their creative processes. Always insightful, these discussions provide a rare opportunity to meet artists and learn first-hand about their inspirations, approaches and techniques. 7pm. Free admission. 402-341-7130 – bemiscenter.org

Travel Journaling & Sketching with Nancy Lepo
November 9 at Omaha Creative Institute, 1516 Cuming St.
Learn how to document your trips via journal with this workshop, which focuses on the ins and outs of travel sketching—quickly capturing scenes and jotting down the ‘feel’ of a place, even if you don’t consider yourself an artist. 10am-12pm. $35. 785-218-3061 – omahacreativeinstitute.org

Closing Reception: Nate Burbeck & Joel Starkey
November 14 at UNO Art Gallery, Weber Fine Arts Building, 6001 Dodge St.
Through panoramic paintings of landscapes depicting isolated moments of the surreal, Burbeck challenges his audience to question reality within the context of contemporary culture. He is accompanied by fellow Minnesotan and contemporary artist Starkey. 4:30-6:30pm. Free admission. 402-554-2796 – unoartgallery.org

Open Studios
November 16 at Bemis Center of Contemporary Arts, 724 S. 12th St.
Open Studios represents a chance for the public to come meet artists-in-residence and experience the Bemis Center’s core mission firsthand. The artists will be available to show you their studio, talk about their process, and give you a look at what they’ve been working on. This event is free and open to the public. 1-4pm. Free admission. 402-341-7130 – bemiscenter.org

CONCERTS

Cold War Kids
November 4 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St.
Los Angeles indie rock band Cold War Kids return to Slowdown in support of their new album, Dear Miss Lonelyhearts. Doors open at 8pm, show starts at 9. $17 day of, $15 in advance. 402-345-7569 – theslowdown.com

Cameron Carpenter
November 7 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
The first organist to be nominated for a Grammy Award® for a solo album, Cameron Carpenter acts more like a rockstar than a traditional organist, creating live performances with the glitz and glamour not typically associated with organ music. 7:30pm. Tickets from $25-70. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.com

Trans-Siberian Orchestra
November 13 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs
This orchestra’s performance is unlike anything other holiday show out there, combining classical, orchestral, symphonic and progressive music into hard rock and heavy metal, complete with a light show and other special effects. 7:30pm. Tickets from $33-60.50. 712-323-0536 – midamericacenter.com

Brad Paisley: “Beat This Summer Tour”
November 14 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Country superstar Brad Paisley returns again to Omaha, armed with new hits, serious guitar chops, and a down-home sound to keep country fans happy. Opening is Danielle Bradbury, winner of this season of The Voice. 7pm. $30.50-63. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

A Night in Treme
November 14 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Capitalizing on the popularity of the HBO series Treme, New Orleans group Soul Rebels will be joined by “The King of Nouveau Swing” Donald Harrison, Jr., trumpeter James Andrews, and others as they bring a little bit of Bourbon Street to the Holland Center. 7:30pm. Tickets from $30-70. 402-731-3140 – omahaperformingarts.org

Hunter Hayes
November 16 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
Grammy®-nominated artist, Hunter Hayes is a multi-talented performer, musician, producer, and writer, who won New Artist of the Year at the 2012 Country Music Association Awards. 7:30pm. $32.50-184.50. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.com

Handel’s Messiah
November 24 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
The Holland Center’s 45th annual ensemble presentation of Handel’s Messiah is a feast for classical music lovers, featuring a 150-voice chorus, soloists, and orchestra. ASL interpretation and audio descriptions are available for those who are deaf or blind. Free admission. 402-312-8210 – voicesofomaha.org

Toby Mac
November 22 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs
Toby Mac, an American Music Award winner for Favorite Christian Artist, comes to Council Bluffs for his Hits Deep Tour, featuring Mandisa Colton Dixon, Brandon Heath, Chris August, Jamie Grace, and Capital Kings. 7pm. Tickets from $25-35. 712-323-0536 – caesers.com/casinos/mid-america-center

Brahms’ Requiem
November 22-23 at Omaha Symphony, 1200 Douglas St.
Omaha Symphonic Chorus, Creighton University Chamber Choir, and University of 
Nebraska-Omaha Concert Choir and Chamber Choirs perform Brahms’ first great symphonic work under the direction of Thomas Wilkins, a transcendent monument to the darkness of grief and light of hope. F-Sat/8pm. $27-80. 402-345-0606 –  omahasymphony.org

The Sounds of Christmas starring Elisabeth von Trapp with the Carolian Brass
November 29 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Elisabeth Von Trapp, granddaughter of the famous Maria & Baron Von Trapp, along with the Carolian Brass will perform some celebratory holiday songs, including a medley from The Sound of Music. 8pm. Tickets from $20-65. 402-345-0202 – omahaperformingarts.org

Creighton’s Classical Christmas
December 3 at Creighton University Lied Education Center for the Arts, 2500 California Plz.
This performance by the Creighton Chamber Choir and University Chorus features a newer holiday tradition for audience-goers, showcasing the work of Benjamin Britten, in honor of the upcoming centennial of his birth. 7:30pm. Free admission. 402-280-2509 – creighton.edu

Christmas at the Cathedral
December 6-8 at St. Cecilia Cathedral, 701 N 40th St.
This 18th annual event, presented by the Omaha Symphonic Chorus offers both inspiring classics and beloved traditional carols. F/8pm; Sun/2pm. $30 preferred seating, $18 general seating. 402-398-1766 – omahasymphonicchorus.org

An Evening with the Priests
December 7 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Three Roman Catholic priests from Northern Ireland come together to blend sacred music and traditional Irish music in this performance by this pop stars-meet-holy men group. 8pm. Tickets from $20-55. 402-345-0202 –
 omahaperformingarts.org

Wynonna & The Big Noise
December 15 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St, Ralston
Five time Grammy®-winning country star Wynonna Judd will perform “A Simpler Christmas,” mixing classic Christmas favorites with her own holiday songs and backed by her band The Big Noise. 7pm. Tickets from $39-99. 800-440-3741 – ralstonarena.com

FAMILY EVENTS

Christmas Stamps
November 1 – December 31 at Boys Town, 137th & W. Dodge Rd.
View Christmas-themed stamps and covers from around the world on display at the Leon Myers Stamp Center, located in the Boys Town Visitors Center. M-F/8am-5pm; Sat/9am-4pm; Sun/11am-4pm. Free admission. 402-498-1141 – boystown.org

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom 
with Peter Gros
November 8 at Holland Preforming Arts Center, 1200 Douglas Street.
As a host of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom, Peter Gros has captivated audiences, introducing them to exotic animals and breathtaking wildlife. Now, he shares his experiences with Omaha through video clips, bloopers, and travel tales. F/8pm; Tickets from $15-35. 402-345-0606 — omahapreformingarts.com

Big Nate
November 8-24 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St.
Lincoln Peirce’s book series, Big Nate, comes to life onstage, as Nate Wright, the kid with the highest detention record at P.S. 38, fights to win the Battle of the Bands and the girl of his dreams. F/7pm; Sat/2&5pm; Sun/2pm. $18 general admission, or free for members. 402-345-4849 – rosetheater.org

Disney Live! Three Classic Fairytales
November 23 at Omaha Civic Auditorium, 1804 Capitol Ave.
Disney staple characters Mickey, Minnie, and Donald are at the heart of this family-friendly performance, featuring three classic fairytales that are woven together to create a heart-warming story that has no shortage of Disney magic. 1pm & 4pm. Tickets from $16.50-47. 402-341-1500 – omahacivic.com

Tree Lighting & Santa’s Arrival at Shadow Lake
November 27 at Shadow Lake Towne Center, 7775 Olson Dr.
Celebrate by welcoming Santa, helping him light the tree, and enjoying a fireworks display. Free admission. 402-537-0046 – 
shadowlakeshopping.com

Santa’s Magic
November 29 – December 22 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St.
This interactive holiday show begins with the entrance of the Snow Queen to lead children in song and ends with Saint Nicholas coming down the chimney to greet each kid himself in this unforgettable holiday experience. Tu-F/10:30am, 11:30am, 1:30pm, & 2:30pm; Sat-Sun/3:30pm. $1 in addition to general admission. 402-342-6164 – ocm.org

Christmas at Boys Town: Tree Lighting
December 1 at Boys Town, 137th & W Dodge Rd.
Visitors can experience a true family-friendly holiday tradition at Boys Town to kick off the Christmas season, complete with lights, carols, and Santa Claus riding in on a fire truck. 7:45pm. Free admission. 402-498-1141 – boystown.org

Holiday Happenings
December 7-21 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
Even the animals are getting into the holiday spirit at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, as special holiday characters will be diving into the shark tank in the Scott Aquarium. Sat/10:45am. Free with regular paid zoo admission. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

Supper with Santa
December 19-22 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 St. 10th St.
Come join Mr. and Mrs. Claus without having to trek all the way to the North Pole. There will be supper, crafts, pictures with Santa, and more. Daily/6-8pm. $20 non-members, $15 members, free for children 2 & under. 402-738-2038 – omahazoo.com

Penguins and Pancakes
December 27-29 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
Enjoy pancakes, crafts, and animal visits from the African penguins. Daily/8:30-10 am. Free with regular paid zoo admission. 402-738-2038 – omahazoo.com

First Night of Play
December 31 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St.
This New Year’s celebration is perfect for the whole family, and leaves time for parents to celebrate afterwards too. Enjoy face painting, balloon artists, a dance party, food, goodie bags, and more. 6-8:30pm. $14 non-members, $10 members. 402-342-6164 – ocm.org

Noon Year’s Eve
December 31 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
An earlier New Year’s Eve celebration that everyone can stay up for, Noon Year’s Eve is complete with activities for the whole family, a beach ball drop, and celebrations with your favorite zoo animals. 10am-1pm. Free with regular paid zoo admission. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

FUNDRAISERS & GALAS

Raise the Roof Gala
November 1 at Creighton University, Harper Center, 2500 California Plz.
Habitat for Humanity’s annual gala chaired by Jessica Duce. 402-884-5957 – habitatomaha.org

Angels Among Us Fall Gala
November 1 at Embassy Suites Old Market, 555 S. 10th St.
Enjoy cocktails, a silent auction, dinner, and music by Chris Saub at Angels Among Us’ annual Fall Gala. $100 per person, $1,000 per table. 402-885-4840 – myangelsamongus.org

TeamMates Tailgate
November 1 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Tom Osborne, Larry the Cable Guy, and Warren Buffett sit down with a special guest at TeamMates Mentoring Program’s annual tailgate event. 6pm. 402-598-3163 – teammates.org

Wicker & Wine Basket Auction
November 7 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs
Lutheran Family Services hosts a fundraising event for the Pottawattamie County Center for Healthy Families. 5:30pm. 402-978-5646 – lfsneb.org

Purses for Paws
November 8 at Regency Court, 120 Regency Pkwy.
Shop for purses, enjoy silent auctions and raffles, and more at Nebraska Humane Society’s Purses for Paws event. 5:30pm. 402-444-7800 ext. 260 – 
nehumanesociety.org

Children’s Hospital & Medical Center Gala
November 9 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
The theme for this year’s Children’s Hospital & Medical Center Gala is “Believe in Happy Endings.” 6pm. 402-955-6851 – 
childrensfoundationomaha.org

Salute to Families – Iowa
November 14 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs
Heartland Family Service honors four southwest Iowa families. 6pm. 402-552-7426 – heartlandfamilyservice.org

Merrymakers Annual Roast
November 14 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Help Merrymakers continue to provide entertainment for seniors by supporting their annual event. This year, Merrymakers will roast Father Tom Fangman. 6pm. Tickets are $200.  402-697-0205.— merrymakers.org

Salute to Families – Nebraska
November 21 at Happy Hollow Club, 1701 S. 105th St.
Heartland Family Service honors four Nebraska families. 6pm. 402-552-7426 – 
heartlandfamilyservice.org

Night of a Thousand Stars
December 1 at Magnolia Hotel, 1615 Howard St.
Join Honorary Chairs Dianne and Allan Lozier as Nebraska AIDS Project celebrates its 20th Annual Night of a Thousand Stars. Online ticket sales end Nov. 30th. 9pm. $60 general, $175 VIP, $475 platinum package. 402-552-9260 – nap.org

RECREATION

Anime NebrasKon 3-Day Anime & Pop Culture Convention
November 1-3 at Ramada Plaza Hotel and Convention Center, 3321 S. 72nd St.
Over 200 scheduled activities are featured this year at Nebraska’s premier Japanese animation and pop-culture convention, including Taiko drumming, a costume contest, martial arts demonstrations, gaming areas, and much more. Doors open 2pm on Friday and close 3pm on Sunday. 402-658-6960 – animenebraskon.com

Autumn Festival, An Arts & Crafts Affair
November 7-10 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St.
This four-day fair, rated one of the top 100 shows according to Sunshine Artist Magazine, will feature hundreds of handicraft works from artists around the country and includes stage entertainment and hourly gift-certificate drawings. Th-F/11am-9pm; Sat/9am-7pm; Sun/10am-5pm. $8 adults, $7 seniors, free for children 10 & under. 402-331-2889 – hpifestivals.com

Veteran’s Recognition Day
November 11 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
Free admission for active or retired veterans and their immediate families. 10am-4pm. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

Lewis and Clark Dog Show
November 16-17 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Furry friends abound at this show featuring participants from the Afghan Hound Club of Omaha, Borzoi Club of Greater Omaha, and Omaha-Council Bluffs Cocker Spaniel Club. There will be events for owners, dog-lovers, and pets alike, including a costume contest and fun match. 402-341-1500 – 
lewisandclarkdogshow.com

Holiday Lights Festival
November 21 – December 31 at Gene Leahy Mall, 14th & Farnam sts.
Join the Omaha community at the Thanksgiving Lighting Ceremony on Nov. 21, which kicks off the six-week Holiday Lights Festival events. Then, ring in the New year with a fireworks display concluding the festival on Dec. 31. 402-345-5401 – holidaylightsfestival.org

Miracle on Farnam
Novermber 23 – January 1 at Midtown Crossing, 31st-33rd at Farnam & Dodge sts.
A season-long celebration of creativity, good cheer, and authentic holiday pleasures. Free admission. 402- 351-9546 – miracleonfarnam.com

Holiday Poinsettia Show
November 29 – January 5 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St.
This spectacular exhibit features a 20-foot-tall poinsettia tree, ornate holiday trees, antique sleighs, and a 300-foot long track that includes several passenger and model freight trains swerving through displays of miniature Omaha landmarks. Daily/9am-5pm. $7 adults, $3 ages 6-12, free for members and children 5 & under. 402-346-4002 – lauritzengardens.org

Bellevue World Fest
November 30 at Lied Activity Center, 2700 Arboretum Dr.
This festival features a special Medieval/Renaissance where visitors can learn about, weaving, woodworking, metal working, and jewelry making along with other holiday entertainment from around the world. 12-4 pm. Free admission. 402-517-1446 – bellevueworldfest.com

Christmas at Boys Town: Historic Creche Display
December 1 – January 11 at Boys Town, 137th & W Dodge Rd.
This historic display features three nativity scenes, including the main crèche, created by a Holocaust survivor, which adorns the historic Music Hall near the main entrance. Other nativities are at Dowd Memorial Catholic Chapel and by the Village Christmas tree. Daily/8am-5pm. Free admission. 402-498-1141 – boystown.org

The Madrigal Christmasse Feaste
December 3 at Regency Marriott Ballroom, 10220 Regency Cir.
Step back in time with this Renaissance-style holiday celebration hosted by the Lord and Lady of the Manor, complete with a multi-course feast, and a special appearance by the court jester. 6pm. $52 individual, $48 groups of 10 or more. 402-556-1400 – ibsencostumes.com

Irish Christmas at Father Flanagan’s Historic Home
December 9-16 at Boys Town, 137th & W Dodge Rd.
The Christmas spirit lives on at the former residence of Father Edward J. Flanagan with traditional Irish Christmas décor including Christmas quilts, antique toys, and ornaments from the 1920s to the 1940s. Daily/10am-4pm. Free admission. 402-498-1141 – boystown.org

RUNS

The Ugly Sweater Run
December 15 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Now grandma’s reindeer sweater can be used for more than just the annual office Christmas party in this fun 5K race that’s anything but pretty. Participants are also asked to bring one new toy to donate to Toys for Tots. Tickets from $34-50. 402-341-1500 – theuglysweaterrun.com

THEATRE

Brian Regan
November 7 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Comedian Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country, visiting more than 80 cities each year with material that relates to a wide audience. 7:30pm. Tickets start at $38.75. 402-345-0606 – 
omahaperformingarts.org

Theresa Caputo
November 13 at Orpheum Theater, 409 N. 16th St.
Theresa Caputo, psychic medium and star of the hit TLC show Long Island Medium, will give interactive readings to audience members throughout the show and will also share personal stories about her life and her unique gifts. 7:30pm. Tickets from $39.75-69.75. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.org

Larry the Cable Guy
November 15 at Orpheum Theater, 409 N. 16th St.
Born in Pawnee City, Neb., Larry the Cable Guy observes and celebrates the workingman and the redneck lifestyle. 7pm & 9:30pm. Tickets start at $35. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.org

The Met: Live in HD – Puccini’s Tosca
November 9 & 13 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
Puccini’s timeless verismo score is well served by an exceptional cast, led by Patricia Racette in the title role of the jealous diva, opposite Roberto Alagna as her lover, Cavaradossi. George Gagnidze is the villainous Scarpia. Nov. 9/11:55am; Nov. 13/6pm. $24 general admission. 402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Dickens Returns
November 15-16 at Field Club of Omaha & General Crook House, 3615 Woolworth Avenue. and 5730 N. 30th Street.
Come join Mr. Dickens—Gerald Dickens, that is—in his energetic readings of some of Charles Dickens’ classic novels. F/2&6pm; 402-555-9990 —  douglascountyhistory.org

Elf the Musical
November 19-24 at Orpheum Theater, 409 N. 16th St.
Follow the hilarious tale of Buddy the Elf as he ventures to New York City to meet his birth father and help him discover the true meaning of Christmas. Tu-Th/7:30pm; F/8pm; Sat/2&8pm; Sun/1:30&7pm. Tickets from $30-75. 402-345-0606 – 
omahaperformingarts.org

The Nutcracker
November 20-23 at Creighton University Lied Education Center for the Arts, 2500 California Plz.
Enjoy this holiday classic ballet performed by the Creighton Dance Company and Department of Fine and Performing Arts. W-F/7:30pm; Sat/2pm. $18 general admission. 402-280-1448 – creighton.edu

Tribes
November 22 – December 15 at SNAP! Productions, 3225 California St.
The story of a deaf boy who comes from a Jewish family and is raised without the knowledge of sign language until he meets Sylvia, a hearing woman born to deaf parents who is now slowly going deaf herself. Th-Sun/8pm. $12-15 on Friday and Saturday shows, $10 on Thursday shows. 402-341-2757 – snapproductions.com

A Christmas Carol
November 22 – December 22 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
Experience Omaha’s favorite holiday tradition as Ebenezer Scrooge goes on a life-changing journey through his past, present, and future. W-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. $35 adults, $24 students. 402-553-0800–omahaplayhouse.com

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol
November 29 – December 22 at Blue Barn Theatre, 614 S. 11th St.
This twist on Dicken’s original story picks up with the story of Ebenezer Scrooge’s business partner, Jacob Marley, who must redeem Scrooge in order to discover his own heart. F-Sat/7:30 pm; Sun 6pm; No show December 5. $25 adults, $20 students and seniors 65+. 402-345-1576 – bluebarn.org

Narnia
December 6-29 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam Street.
This musical version of C.S. Lewis’ classic children’s novel transports audience members to the enchanted world of Narnia without having to go through a magical wardrobe themselves. Narnia has a run-time of two hours with an intermission and is recommended for children ages 6-13. Sat-Sun/2pm; Dec.26/7pm. $25 main floor, $20 balcony. Members save $7 per ticket. 402-345-4849 — rosetheater.org

Yesterday and Today
December 6-29 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
This all-request Beatles tribute show gives audience members a chance to share stories and relieve memories with their favorite Beatles songs. Tickets are $38. Th-Sat/7:30pm: Sun/2pm. 402-553-800 – omahaplayhouse.com

The Met: Live in HD – Verdi’s Falstaff
December 14 & 18 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
Verdi’s masterpiece returns to The Met for the first time since 2005, in a production by Robert Carson featuring Ambrogio Maestri singing the title role of the brilliant and blustery Sir John Falstaff. Dec.14/11:55am; Dec.18/6pm. $20 Film Stream members and Opera Omaha subscribers. $24 general admission. 402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Calendar of Events: September/October 2013

September 3, 2013 by

ART & MUSEUM EXHIBITS

A Bug’s World
Through September 8 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St.
A larger-than-life interactive exhibit that allows children to experience what it is like to be a bug. Tu-F/10am-4pm; Sat/9am-5pm; Sun/1pm-5pm. $9 adults & kids, $8 seniors, free for members and children 2 & under. 402-342-6164 – ocm.org

A T. Rex Named Sue
Through September 8 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St.
Visit one of Chicago’s Field Museum’s traveling exhibitions, Sue, the largest, most complete, best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex in the world. M/10am-5pm; Tu/10am-8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; Sun/1-5pm. $9 adults, $7 seniors (62+), $6 ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 402-444-5071 – durhammuseum.org

Ron Parks at the Fred Simon Gallery
Through September 20 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnam St.
Sculptor Ron Parks showcases this craftsmanship in this exhibition of contemporary Nebraska visual artists. M-F/8am-5pm. Free admission. 402-595-2142 – nebraskaartscouncil.org

Baseball at Boys Town
Through September 30 at Boys Town, 14100 Crawford St.
Highlights the history of baseball from 1917 to today at Boys Town and features autographed baseballs and memorabilia from Hall of Fame players Babe Ruth, Ozzie Smith, and Hank Aaron. Daily/10am-4pm. Free admission. 402-498-1186 – boystown.org

The Lorax
Through November 3 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.
A showcase of selected Dr. Seuss preliminary crayon drawings and final pen and ink line art for this iconic book from the collection of the LBJ Presidential Library & Museum. Tu-W/10am-4pm; Th/10am-8pm; F-Sat/10am-4pm; Sun/12-4pm. Free admission. 402-342-3300 – joslyn.org

Featured artists Daharsh, Ocken, and Vande Voort
September 3-29 at Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd., 405 S. 11th St.
New works by glassblower Frank Daharsh, painter Virginia Ocken, and painter Dar Vande Voort. Tu-Th/11am-5pm; F-Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-6pm. Free admission. 402-342-9617 – artistsco-opgallery.com

Rockbrook Village® 42nd Annual Art Fair
September 7-8 at Rockbrook Village Shopping Center, 108th & W. Center Rd.
Omaha’s premier art fair since 1971. Over 160 national, regional and local artists will display and sell their one-of-a-kind works of art. 10am-5pm. Free admission. 402-390-0890 – rockbrookvillage.com

Goose Bumps! The Science of Fear
September 28 – January 5 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St.
Created by The California Science Center, Durham Museum presents the many sides of fear. Test yourself against four common fears. Observe how fear changes and learn simple ways to combat stress. Tu/10am-8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; Sun/1-5pm. $9 adults, $7 seniors (62+), $6 ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 402-444-5071 – durhammuseum.org

Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection
September 28 – January 5 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.
A selection of paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from a historic gift pledged to the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2010 by Emily Fisher Landau. Her collection features some of the most influential artists of the 20th century, including Andy Warhol, Glenn Ligon, Sherrie Levine, Agnes Martin, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, John Baldessari, Kiki Smith, and Ed Ruscha. Tu-W/10am-4pm; Th/10am-8pm; F-Sat/10am-4pm; Sun/12-4pm. Free admission. 402-342-3300 – joslyn.org

Featured artists Johnston, Methot-Swanson, Stizman
October 1-27 at Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd., 405 S. 11th St.
New works by painters Judith Anthony Johnston and Katrina Methot-Swanson, and sculptor Tom Sitzman. Tu-Th/11am-5pm; F-Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-6pm. Free admission. 402-342-9617 – artistsco-opgallery.com

Featured artists Akers, Fetter, Gaines
October 29 – November 24 at Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd., 405 S. 11th St.
New works by mixed media artist Sean Akers, painter Joan Fetter, and weaver Agneta Gaines. Tu-Th/11am-5pm; F-Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-6pm. Free admission. 402-342-9617 – artistsco-opgallery.com

CONCERTS

End of the Summer Concert Series
Through September 27 at Midtown Crossing, 31st to 33rd, Farnam to Dodge sts.
A weekly concert series to end the summer, featuring Billy McGuigan and a joint concert with the Omaha Symphony and Opera Omaha. F/7:30pm. Free admission. 402-598-9676 – midtowncrossing.com

Hullabaloo Music & Camping Festival
September 5-8 at Sokol Park, 905 Allied Rd.
A celebration of music featuring live music from regional and national bands and DJs. Acts include the Aaron Freeman (former lead singer of Ween), Blackalicous, Monophonics, The Floozies, Kris Lager Band, Samantha Fish, DJEM, Lovedrunk, and much more! Food, drink and local vendors will be on hand. $20-80. 402-210-4747 – hullabaloomusicfestival.com

Scotty McCreery
September 13 at Stir Concert Cove, Harrah’s Casino, Council Bluffs, IA
Scott “Scotty” McCreery is an American country music singer from North Carolina and winner of the tenth season of American Idol. Doors open at 6pm; show at 8pm. $35 general admission. 712-329-6000 – harrahscouncilbluffs.com

Bret Michaels
September 20 at Stir Concert Cove, Harrah’s Casino, Council Bluffs, IA
Rock out the end of the summer with actor, director, screenwriter, producer, and reality television personality Bret Michaels, formerly of the band Poison. Doors open at 6pm; show at 8pm. $33 general admission. 712-329-6000 – harrahscouncilbluffs.com

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy
October 10 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Big Bad Voodoo Daddy gained national attention when “You & Me and the Bottle Makes Three (Tonight)” and “Go Daddy-O” were featured in the film Swingers. Their concerts feature big horns, wild jungle-jazz rhythms, zoot suits & dancing flapper girls. 7:30pm. 402-345-0202 – omahaperformingarts.org

Keith Urban – Light the Fuse Tour 2013
October 18 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
One of the industry’s most electrifying live performers, four-time Grammy Award winner and American Idol judge Keith Urban is bringing his “Light The Fuse Tour 2013” to Omaha. Special guests include: Little Big Town and Dustin Lynch. 7pm. $37-61.50. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

Avenged Sevenfold with Deftones and Ghost B.C.
October 22 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Avenged Sevenfold, a rock band known for their diverse rock sound and dramatic imagery in album covers and t-shirts, has toured all over the United Kingdom, as well as mainland Europe, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. 8pm. $18.50-73. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

World Blues: Taj Mahal and Vusi Mahlasela
October 25 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.
Grammy®-winning composer, multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Taj Mahal with ‘The Voice’ of South Africa Vusi Mahlasela. One of the most prominent figures in late 20th century blues and roots music, his music draws inspiration from virtually every corner of the world. 8pm. 402-345-0202 – omahaperformingarts.org

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
October 29 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Premier hip-hop duo Macklemore & Ryan Lewis previously showcased their talents at The Waiting Room and Sokol Auditorium, but are now taking their music to Omaha’s main stage, CenturyLink Center Omaha. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis recently made Billboard history as the only duo to send their first two singles to No. 1 on both the Hot 100 and Top 40 Radio charts with new single “Can’t Hold Us” and breakout hit “Thrift Shop.” “Same Love,” a song and video in support of marriage equality, galvanized young fans and voters, and is certified a Gold single. 7:30pm. $29.50-82. 402-341-1500 – centurylinkcenteromaha.com

FAMILY EVENTS

Young Frankenstein – Forever Young Family & Children’s Film Series
Through September 12 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
With support from the Lincoln Financial Foundation, Film Streams presents Forever Young Family & Children’s Film Series – Summer 2013 with Mel Brooks’ infamous Young Frankenstein. See website for showtimes. $9 general, $7 seniors, students, teachers, military, bike-friendly, $4.50 members, $2.50 12 & under. 402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Dinosaurs Alive: The Lost Valley
Through October 13 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
Animatronic dinosaurs intermingled with other animals transports the zoo back 65 million years to when these prehistoric beasts roamed the planet. Daily/9am-5pm. $4 with regular paid zoo admission. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

Knuffle Bunny
September 6-22 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St.
Enjoy a hilarious musical version of the beloved Caldecott Honor book and get your family giggling. $18 general admission, free for members. F/7pm; Sat/2 & 5pm; Sun/2pm. 402-345-4849 – rosetheater.org

Forbidden Planet – Forever Young Family & Children’s Film Series
September 14-26 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
With support from the Lincoln Financial Foundation, Film Streams presents Forever Young Family & Children’s Film Series – Summer 2013 with the Oscar-nominated Forbidden Planet. See website for showtimes. $9 general, $7 seniors, students, teachers, military, bike-friendly, $4.50 members, $2.50 12 & under. 402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Family Fiesta at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium
September 22 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo, 3701 S. 10th St.
A fiesta for the whole family featuring soccer mascots, a live mariachi band, face painting, and more. 12-5pm. Free with regular paid zoo admission. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

ARTsarben
September 28-29 at Aksarben Village, 67th and Center Sts.
Bring the whole family for fun, games, good food, live music, face painting, KidZone with bouncy houses, and most importantly the ART! Sat/10am-7pm; Sun/10am-4pm. Free admission. 402-345-5401 – artsarben.com

MathAlive!
September 28 – January 5 at Strategic Air & Space Museum, 28210 W. Park Hwy
Exhibit that brings to life the real math behind what kids love most—video games, sports, fashion, music, robotics, and more—and creates interactive and immersive experiences. Daily/10am-5pm. $12 adults, $11 seniors & active/retired military, $6 ages 4-12. 402-944-3100 – sasmuseum.com

Robin Hood
October 11-27 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St.
The legendary tale bursts into fresh & fiery new life in this unique, fast-paced adaptation. Robin Hood stands up for justice as he cleverly evades the Sheriff of Nottingham. Be enchanted as a band of merry men (and women) bring familiar characters to life in surprising new ways. F/7pm; Sat/2 & 5pm; Sun/2pm. $18 general admission, free for members. 402-345-4849 – rosetheater.org

Spooktacular at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium
October 18 at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo, 3701 S. 10th St.
Bring your little ghouls and goblins to this safe and fun Halloween event. 5:30-8:30pm. $8 with regular paid zoo admission. 402-733-8401 – omahazoo.com

FUNDRAISERS & GALAS

Zoofari 2013
September 7 at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, 3701 S. 10th St.
Fundraiser supporting the Omaha Zoo Foundation with a trunk show, dinner, live and silent auctions. 402-738-2073 – omahazoofoundation.org

Touch a Truck
September 7 at First Data, 6855 Pacific St.
Free family event with trucks, police cars, and firetrucks supporting Child Saving Institute. 11am. 402-504-3664 – childsaving.org

36th Annual Archbishop’s Dinner for Education
September 12 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Dinner recognizing teachers and administrators in the Archdiocese of Omaha schools. 402-827-3757 – archomaha.org

7th Annual Brew HaHa
September 12 at Stinson Park at Aksarben Village, 2285 S. 67th St.
Beer and food sampling event supporting Omaha Habitat for Humanity. 5pm. 402-884-4370 – habitatomaha.org

6th Annual Wine and Beer Event
September 12 at The Shops of Legacy, 168th & Center sts.
Support ALS in the Heartland by drinking, stolling, and shopping. 6pm. 402-592-2374 – alsintheheartland.org

Global Voices: Faith in Action
September 15 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Event recognizing faith-based community leaders and supporting Lutheran Family Services. 402-978-5646 – lfsneb.com

Cruisin’ for a Cure Omaha 2013
September 15 at Methodist Hospital Parking Lots, 8601 W. Dodge Rd.
Auto show and free prostate screenings with proceeds benefiting The Estabrook Cancer Center at Methodist Hospital. cruisinforacure.com

Big Red Tailgate
September 20 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Enjoy cocktails, a silent auction, and dinner with Completely KIDS. 5:30pm. 402-397-5809 completelykids.org or call 402-397-5809 – completelykids.org

Spotlight Gala
September 21 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Annual fundraiser for Voices for Children with cocktails, food, and more. 5:30pm. 402-597-3100 – voicesforchildren.com

Our Lady of Lourdes Annual Fall Festival
September 22 at Our Lady of Lourdes, 2110 S. 32nd Ave.
Fundraising festival with games, food, and more. 12pm. 402-341-5604 – ollomaha.com

Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes 2013
September 22 at Stinson Park at Aksarben Village, 2285 S. 67th St.
A fundraising walk supporting the American Diabetes Association. 402-571-1101 – diabetes.org

Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day 2013
September 26 at Anthony’s Steakhouse Ballroom & Patio, 7220 F St.
Fundraising event for Project Harmony with live Irish music and prizes. 402-595-1326 – projectharmony.com 

Omaha Signature Chefs Auction
September 26 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Signature dishes by 20 chefs, a raffle, and a live auction, supporting March of Dimes Nebraska. 5:30pm. 402-496-7111 – marchofdimes.com

Restoring Hearts with Bike Parts Event
September 26 at Hilton Omaha, 1001 Cass St.
Omaha Home for Boys gala featuring a motorcycle raffle and special guest Marlee Matlin. 5:30pm. 402-457-7000 – omahahomeforboys.org

Jewels of Autumn
September 28 at Alegent Creighton Health Lakeside Hospital, 16901 Lakeside Hills Ct.
Annual fundraiser with food, drinks, and auctions. 6pm. 402-717-8182 – alegentcreighton.com

Walk for the Animals 2013
September 29 at Nebraska Humane Society, 8929 Fort St.
Fundraising walk with pets. 8:30am. 402-444-7800 – nehumanesociety.org

Walk to End Alzheimer’s 2013
September 29 at Turner Park at Midtown Crossing, 3220 Farnam St.
Fundraising walk for Alzheimer’s Association. 12pm. 402-502-4301 – alz.org

43rd Annual Boy Scout Golf Invitational
September 30 at Shadow Ridge Country Club, 1501 S. 188th Plz.
Golf event for Boy Scouts of America, Mid-America Council. 11am. 402-514-3011 – mac-bsa.org

50th Anniversary Celebration
October 4 at Embassy Suites La Vista, 12520 Westport Pkwy.
Inaugural fundraising event supporting Legal Aid of Nebraska. 5:30pm. 402-348-1069 – legalaidofnebraska.com

Holy Name Harvest
October 4 at Holy Name School, 2901 Fontenelle Blvd.
Dinner, raffle, and silent and live auctions. 5:30pm. 402-451-6622 – holynameschoolomaha.org

Expressions of Hope Gala
October 4 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Dinner, youth program, and silent and live auctions supporting Hope Center for Kids. 402-341-4673 – hopecenterforkids.com

Good Apple Awards
October 10 at Historic Livestock Exchange Building, 4920 S. 30th St.
Live music, cocktails, and Nebraska Appleseed community justice awards. 6pm. 402-438-8853 – neappleseed.com

HomeGrown
October 10 at Brix at Village Pointe, 225 N. 170th St.
Local wine and beer tasting supporting Nebraska Children’s Home Society. 4pm. 402-451-0787 – nchs.org

Hops & Grapes Fall Festival
October 11 at Field Club of Omaha, 3615 Woolworth Ave.
Partnership 4 Kids’ wine and beer tasting event. 7pm. 402-930-3002 – p4k.org

7th Annual Comfort Food Classic
October 13 at Ramada Omaha, 3321 S. 72nd St.
Chef competition supporting Ted E. Bear Hollow. 5pm. 402-502-2773 – tedebearhollow.org

117th Ak-Sar-Ben Coronation & Scholarship Ball
October 19 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Foundation’s annual scholarship ball. 402-554-9600 – aksarben.org

Ladle of Love Festival
October 20 at Open Door Mission’s Garland Thompson Men’s Center, 2705 N. 20th St.
Soups and baked goods served by local chefs, supporting Open Door Mission. 1pm. 402-829-1508 – opendoormission.org

Scholarship Luncheon
October 22 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Phoenix Academy luncheon with guest speaker, former First Lady Laura Bush. 11:30am. 402-390-0556 – phoenixacademyomaha.org

6th Annual Monster Bash for Brain Cancer
October 24 at Georgetown Club, 2440 S. 141st Cir.
Live music, kids activities, food, and more, supporting Leap-for-a-Cure. 6:30pm. 402-333-9370 – leapforacure.org

Fall Luncheon 2013
October 24 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Women’s Fund of Omaha event with keynote speaker Betsy Myers. 11:30am. 402-827-9280 – omahawomensfund.org

Centennial Gala
October 24 at Mutual of Omaha Dome, 3300 Dodge St.
MOSAIC event featuring keynote speaker Timothy P. Shriver, Ph.D. 6pm. 402-896-9988 – mosaicinfo.org

RECREATION

Septemberfest
Through September 2 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Featuring live bands, Spider-Man, princesses, balloon artists, magicians, Omaha Roller Girls vs. North Dakota’s Roller Derby Team, BBQ & Ribeye Steak Cookoff, Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament, and more. F/5pm-12am; Sat/12-4pm; Sun-M/12pm-12am. $4 adults, free for children 5 & under. 402-341-1500 – septemberfestomaha.com

Florence Mill Farmers Market
Through September 29 at Florence Mill, 9102 N. 30th St.
A local farmers market featuring fresh, local produce, artisans and live music every Sunday afternoon. Sun/10am-3pm. Free admission. 402-551-1233 – historicflorence.org

River City Star Friday Evening Public Dinner Cruise
Through October 4 at River City Star Riverboat, 151 Freedom Park Rd.
Spend an evening on the Missouri River while enjoying live entertainment on this 1.5 hour, two entree dinner cruise. F/6:30-8pm. $42 adults, $38 seniors (65+), $21 children 12 & under. 402-342-7827 – rivercitystar.com

Omaha Restaurant Week
September 13-22 at participating Omaha restaurants
Grab your forks and knives and arrive with an empty stomach for Omaha Restaurant Week, a 10-day promotion celebrating the unique, exciting culinary scene in the Omaha metro. During this festival of food, participating restaurants offer an exclusive specials menu featuring multi-course dinners at a fixed price of either $20, $30, or $40 per person. 402-850-6776 – omaharestaurantweek.com

Street of Dreams
September 14-29 at Deer Creek, 120th and Deer Creek Dr.
Tour upscale, custom dream homes while gathering cutting edge design ideas from a variety of Omaha’s Best Custom Builders. W-Sun/12-8pm. $10 adults. 402-727-1054 – streetofdreams.org

Midtown Car Show
September 15 at Midtown Crossing, 31st-33rd and Dodge-Farnam sts.
Check out some of the area’s most fabulous rides: vintage cars and trucks, project cars, hot rods, and more. 10am-2pm. Free admission. 402-351-5964 – midtowncrossing.com

Oktoberfest
September 20-21 at German-American Society Inc., 3717 S. 120th St.
Omaha’s oldest and largest Oktoberfest celebration. Enjoy great authentic foods, including schnitzel, German potato salad, sauerkraut, German tortes, a few hogs and dozens of chickens, plus authentic music for dancing. F/5pm-12am; Sat/12pm-12am. $3 Saturday admission, $4 Sunday admission. 402-333-6615 – germanamericansociety.org

2013 Loess Hills Wine Festival
September 21 at River’s Edge Park, Council Bluffs, IA.
A celebration of the Grape Harvest with a fun day of entertainment. Admission includes live music by Pink Kadillac, a souvenir wine glass, five tickets that may be used for wine tastings, grape stomp, hayride, and more. 3-10pm. $10-50. weigga.org

22nd Annual Fort Omaha Intertribal Powwow
September 22 at Metropolitan Community College, 5730 N. 30th St.
A traditional intertribal powwow featuring Native American music, dancing, crafts, and food. A family friendly event that explores the culture and traditions of Native Americans. 1-7pm. Free admission. 402-457-2253 – mccneb.edu

Lauritzen Gardens Antique & Garden Show
September 26-29 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St.
This year, the Antique & Garden Show is celebrating its 10th anniversary. To commemorate, Harrison Howard, a California artist, was commissioned to provide several one-of-a-kind pieces of art for the show. His piece, Spring, is an exclusive for Lauritzen Gardens. Lecturers this year are Carolyne Roehm, Kathryn Ireland, Eddie Ross, and Danielle Rollins. F-Sat/10am; Sun/11am. $15 general admission, $75 luncheon lectures, $125 preview party. 402-346-4002 – lauritzengardens.org

Ak-Sar-Ben’s River City Rodeo & Stock Show
September 26-29 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
A celebration of the region’s western heritage, featuring the Justin Boots Championships Rodeo, the Ak-Sar-Ben 4-H Stock Show, and the Douglas County Fair. Tu-F/10am-7pm; Sat/9am-7pm; Sun/9am-4pm. Free admission, except rodeo and other selected events. 402-554-9600 – rivercityrodeo.com

Just for Her Expo
October 11-13 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
Shop boutiques, test products and services, and more at this special event just for women in Omaha. F/5-10pm; Sat/10am-6pm; Sun/11am-4pm. justforherexpoomaha.com

25th Annual Fall Home and Garden Expo
October 25-27 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St.
The largest showcase in Nebraska and Iowa with over 100,000 sq. ft. of the latest products and services for the home – inside and out. F/5-9pm; Sat/10am-7pm; Sun/12-5pm. 402-346-8003 – showofficeonline.com

RUNS

Up & Over the River Walk & Run
September 1 at Miller’s Landing, 151 Freedom Park Rd.
An 8K run and walk that leads participants along the riverfront paths and over the Bob Kerry Pedestrian Bridge to Iowa and back. 8:30am. $30 runners, $25 walkers. 402-346-4800 – septemberfestomaha.com

HITS 38th Annual Omaha Marathon
September 22 at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, 1200 Mike Fahey St.
Listen to live music as you run by the TD Ameritrade Stadium, the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge, and through the Old Market. 7am. $80 marathon, $65 half-marathon, $45 10K. 402-546-1800 – omahamarathon.com

SPORTS

Visit Omaha 2013 Women’s Norceca Championship
September 16-21 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St.
Watch 10 teams from the North America, Central America and Caribbean region compete in this 6-day event. See the U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Team, a 2-time Olympic silver medalist, defend their title as the current NORCECA Women’s Continental Champion. 402-934-6291 – ralstonarena.com

THEATRE

Other Desert Cities
Through September 15 at SNAP! Productions, 3225 California St.
This Pulitzer Prize-nominated play explores the relationships of a family with differing political views and a tragic family secret that is threatened to be exposed. 402-341-2757 – snapproductions.com

Sirens
Through September 15 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
This play follows the story of Sam, a one-hit-wonder songwriter, whose marriage with his wife of 25 years is stifled by his obsession with finding the next big hit. When he encounters a siren from Greek mythology out at sea, she helps him realize Rose was always the love of his life. Th-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. $35 adults, $21 students. 402-553-0800 – omahaplayhouse.com

Bollywood and Beyond
Through October 3 at Film Streams, 1340 Mike Fahey St.
A comprehensive overview of India’s prolific filmmaking traditions that presents 10 classics from a given era of Bollywood—Mumbai-made, Hindi-language films. See website for showtimes and admission. 402-933-0259 – filmstreams.org

Les Misérables
September 20 – October 27 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
The world’s longest running and most loved musical. Set in 19th Century France, Les Mis is the epic tale of Jean Valjean as he breaks his parole and is pursued by Inspector Javert while caring for the young orphaned Cosette. W-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. 402-553-0800 – omahaplayhouse.com

The Book of Mormon
October 12-20 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St.
The critically acclaimed and Tony® Award-winning religious satire musical, The Book of Mormon, is coming to Omaha for a nine-day run. The New York Times calls it “the best musical of this century,” and Entertainment Weekly proclaims it as “the funniest musical of all time.” Tu-W/7:30pm; F-Sat/8pm; Sun/1:30pm & 7pm. $50-140. 402-345-0606 – omahaperformingarts.com

Freud’s Last Session
October 18 – November 17 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St.
An astute and witty conversation between scholar C.S. Lewis and Dr. Sigmund Freud shortly before Freud’s death, covering normally taboo topics, such as God, religion, sex and war. Th-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. 402-553-0800 – omahaplayhouse.com

Welcome to William’s Nightmare

Photography by Bill Sitzmann and Mystery Manor

The entryway of the 19th-century home is cramped, musty-smelling, and dark. A thunderstorm rolls appropriately in the background. Bloodstains spatter the wallpaper, and the portrait of a resigned-looking woman hangs on the wall.

“This—” Wayne Sealy bangs the head of his ax next to the portrait “—is Greta Hall. Murdered here by her loving husband—” bang! “—William.”

Wayne, the owner of Mystery Manor, warms to his performance in Downtown Omaha’s permanent haunted house at 18th and Burt streets. He spins the house’s official yarn about William Hall, who was later murdered by Greta’s brother. “To this day, William still walks these halls with his ax, looking for a pretty gal to join him in his garden party. FOR WHICH YOU QUALIFY,” Wayne booms impressively. “Please enter through this door right here.”

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The first three rooms of Mystery Manor detail the story of William and Greta Hall, until “William” confronts guests in the flickering light of a parlor. “Dead as dreams, a new nightmare began,” the murderer intones. “Go! Behind you! Enter my nightmare.”

Nine scenes take guests through William’s torment, up and down three stories and across 6,000 square feet. Over the course of about 25 minutes, more than 30 volunteers make it their mission to deliver a good, old-fashioned Halloween scare.

A veteran actor himself, Wayne explains that a good scare consists of three stages. First is the set-up, the actor setting the scene for how guests will encounter him. Second is the approach. “Guests either approach you, or you approach them,” he says (don’t worry, actors never intentionally touch guests at Mystery Manor). The third part is, in his opinion, the most critical element of the scare and one that an inexperienced actor may neglect: the disengagement.

“Once you do what you do, it can go to crap in a second because now you’re just a man in a costume. You have to get out of Dodge,” Wayne explains. “As soon as you turn around to leave, you become eye candy.” The guest’s focus is now on the departing actor, “and now they’re all set for the next guy to come around and nail ’em.” As soon as a second actor has the attention, the first one can double-back for another scare.

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But it’s not just actors in place to bring the fright. Animatronics, projections, monitors, careful lighting, and themed soundtracks round out the experience. For example, an animatronic dog jumps out to within six inches of a tight hallway in a Deliverance-themed zone. His name is Fluffy.

“We try to treat it like a rollercoaster,” says Mark Sealy, Wayne’s son and manager of Mystery Manor. “You need to have peaks and valleys.” He describes a scene with a gypsy fortuneteller. “She calms you down, she takes your hand, and she does a little fortune read. So you’re cresting the rollercoaster before plunging down again.”

“Give credit to the public,” Wayne points out. “If they’re not interacting, we’ve got nothing.” What actors can do, he says, is try to hit phobias, and the house is arrayed to touch on them all. Guests should avert their eyes in the zombie apocalypse room or suffer the consequences. A possessed circus includes a tunnel here and a back door there, enabling clowns and fortune tellers to slink around unseen until the last moment. A 60-foot slide spits guests out into a slaughterhouse. The child’s room is slowly burning. “It’s…pretty creepy,” Mark admits. “We did buy some new props this year for this room.”

Other less commercial elements add to the creepiness of the house, though the paying public may never notice them. “The building has stuff happen all the time,” Mark says as he walks down a behind-the-scenes staircase. “Every once in a while, we’ll find the teddy bears from the child’s room lined up here on the stairs. They just get put here. We think the ghost uses this almost as the house’s lost and found. If someone loses a baseball hat the night before, we’ll find it here.”

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Kind-hearted volunteers?

Mark shakes his head emphatically. “I’ve been here alone, and…that’s not it.”

And the ghost? Who is it? Because William and Greta Hall are fake, right?

Mark shares that in the late 1800s, No. 716 was actually a house of ill repute. “We do know, we have it documented, that one of the women who worked here was murdered along with her kid,” he says. “We don’t normally tell that story because it’s not very family-friendly. So that’s not the story we go off of.”

So. Say hello to “Greta” the next time you visit Mystery Manor.

Mystery Manor opens for the season on Fri., Sept. 13. For more information, visit mysterymanoromaha.org.

Just the Facts, Ma’am

  • Mystery Manor has been running for 30 years.
  • Over 100 volunteers act in the house per season.
  • Some actors have been volunteering for as long as 29 years.
  • The flow of the house hasn’t changed in 27 years.
  • Staff, including volunteers, can empty the house in less than 53 seconds for a fire drill.
  • It takes two hours a night to get all actors in makeup, including
  • prosthetics, latex, special effects makeup, and airbrushing.
  • It takes volunteers a month of bi-weekly training sessions to learn to
  • navigate the house.
  • Each of the house’s nine zones has its own exit. Only nine groups are
  • allowed in the building at a time, enabling each group to have its own exit.
  • Each group consists of no more than six people.
  • Engineers check the house annually for structural soundness. (Still, leave the heels at home. Uneven surfaces abound.)
  • In the Pharaoh’s tomb scene, hieroglyphics actually spell out insults about Mystery Manor actors.

Gridiron Hero Becomes Mentor and Coach

August 27, 2013 by
Photography by Eric Francis Photography and Ted Kirk

What former Nebraska Cornhusker Steven Warren remembers most from his days playing football is not a particular game or plays, but rather the camaraderie among his teammates—along with key tenants such as persistence, integrity, and trustworthiness. These were experiences and traits that would serve Warren well later in life.

Recruited out of Springfield, Mo., he recalls Nebraska Head Coach Tom Osborne paying Warren and his family a visit in their living room the same week Big Red won the 1995 national championship. Warren accepted a UNL football scholarship and packed his bags for Lincoln.

Warren (96) delivers a bone-crushing hit back in his playing days for Big Red.

Warren (96) delivers a bone-crushing hit back in his playing days for Big Red.

“Nebraska football was No. 1; it was everywhere,” Warren recalls. “And being a part of it was like being a part of The Beatles.”

Freshman year was both a culture shock and an athletic shock for Warren: rigorous practices alongside the fame of being a Cornhusker. “There was so much temptation because of what you were part of. But you also had to learn time management,” he adds.

While playing for Nebraska, Warren found himself developing close friendships with other players and families in and around Lincoln. Oftentimes, parents would seek Warren out to speak with their children about setting goals, planning for the future, and living one’s dream.

Warren left Nebraska as a 3rd round pick of the Green Bay Packers in the 2000 NFL Draft. Thirteen weeks into his rookie year, Warren was sidelined with an injury and told he would miss the remainder of the season. He stayed in Green Bay, undergoing rigorous rehabilitation and training. He returned to the Packers for one more season before moving to the AFL, first playing for the San Jose Sabercats and, later, the Arizona Rattlers. At each of his AFL stints, Warren suffered separate injuries. “That’s when I realized my body was trying to tell me something,” he recalls.

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Warren returned to University of Nebraska-Lincoln and finished his sociology degree in 2004. After graduation, he had a decision to make. His wife, Heidi, is from Columbus, so staying in Nebraska certainly seemed like an option. And being a Nebraska alumni opened many doors for Warren. Former Huskers often pursued successful careers after leaving the field.

But a sales job or related opportunities just didn’t feel right.

“I always liked helping others, and I worked with mentors while at Nebraska,” Warren shares. At his Lincoln home near 30th and Y streets, some of Warren’s fondest memories were sitting on his porch and talking with children and teens who lived in the neighborhood.

That feeling never left him, which is why today he is president and founder of D.R.E.A.M. (Developing Relationships through Education, Athletics, Mentoring). It’s an Omaha-based nonprofit mentoring organization that reaches out to young men enrolled in middle school.

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“Seven years ago, everything for D.R.E.A.M. just fell into place: the pieces, the people. It was meant to be,” Warren says.

D.R.E.A.M. began in 2006 as an after-school program at Walnut Hill Elementary School at 43rd and Charles streets. Five volunteers met regularly with 20 at-risk students. Today, the program has expanded to several Omaha schools and added a chapter in Springfield, Mo., Warren’s hometown. In all, the program serves about 300 boys.

D.R.E.A.M. finds its success from 40 volunteers who spend three to five hours each week at an assigned school throughout the academic year. The theme is simple: becoming a man.

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“Our volunteers work with seventh- and eighth-grade students each school year teaching them the positive attributes of being a man: respect, responsibility, relationship building, establishing rapport,” Warren says. “All of these lessons I learned from football at Nebraska and our peer counseling.”

D.R.E.A.M. teaches young men that it’s okay (even encouraged) to be successful in school. College-age mentors serve as living, breathing examples of the success that comes with hard work, dedication, and diligence.

Teena Foster, an Omaha Public Schools site director at McMillan Magnet Center Middle School, has worked alongside Warren and his college-age volunteers since last fall. Foster says she continues to see growth in the seventh- and eighth-grade students who participate in D.R.E.A.M. each week. And she knows Warren is the driving force.

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“Steve is dedicated to mentoring these young students,” Foster explains. “He’s always smiling, is always pleasant. So are his volunteers. They build great relationships with our students. Mentors are extremely important in these young lives.”

Warren’s belief in mentorship yielded a second program that also occupies much of his time. From his experiences as a student athlete, Warren launched Warren Academy in 2010. It’s designed to provide students (from elementary and middle school to high school and college) with leadership skills and character-building through athletics.

Warren Academy, however, isn’t just for students. Coaches and other leaders also participate to improve and refine a variety of leadership skills, both on and off of the field. Warren Academy programs include training sessions, camps, coaching clinics, nutritional counseling, education assistance, and mentoring. The athletic training component features speed, strength, and agility training programs. Warren says that once the organization has its own facility, Warren Academy’s offerings will expand to include fitness for adults and children of all ages.

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“Our goal is to become the primary training resource for field sports,” Warren adds. “That includes baseball, football, track, soccer, and lacrosse.”

Seems Warren’s best playing position is that of teacher. And he’s loving every minute of it.

Let’s Go Antiquing

August 16, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

The Old Market has always been the place to find those unique items…things you wouldn’t find anywhere else. Nowhere is that more true than in the variety of antique shops in the area.

Whether you are looking for a specific item, enjoy antiquing, or just like to spend the afternoon reminiscing, each of these shops is a must-see and a great way to spend the day with friends.

While a bit off the beaten path, The Antique Annex, located at 1125 Jackson St., is a small shop that offers a lot. Owner Joe Dempsey opened the shop nearly two years ago but has many years of experience in dealing and selling antiques.

“We’re kind of in a weird location and don’t get as much traffic as a lot of other stores,” he says. This presents a great opportunity to find that treasure before someone else does. He explains the dealers he works with focus in on more decorative household items. “We deal a little bit in the more high-end stuff. You don’t have to search through a ton of [stuff] to find the nice things…they’re already here.”

Dempsey says that the hot items people are searching for now are furnishings and accessories from the 1950s: Lucite chairs and more industrial-type items. “We get a lot of kids finding things for their apartments.” Many are looking to give their downtown loft a unique, retro look. But he also sees everyone from moms to high-end collectors. “We see a little bit of everybody.”

Just across the street at 1116 Jackson St. is Second Chance Antiques, an Omaha staple that carries “pretty much everything from clothes to furniture,” says Elysia Jarvis, acting manager of the shop. “We get new stuff all the time. That’s the fun part. People will come in almost weekly because they know there will be something new to look for.”

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It was Jarvis’ mother, Susan Hoffman Brink, who opened Second Chance in 1971 and loved every minute of the 40-plus years she ran the shop. Brink passed away last April, but it was her dream for the business to continue. Her family and friends are dedicated to making her dream a reality. They are currently in the process of moving to a new location, just west of the Old Market on 14th and Harney streets. Quite the feat, as the two-level warehouse is packed full of fun finds: The basement is full of retro-style clothing and accessories. The main floor holds everything else you can imagine: dishes, décor, furniture, old photographs, and knick-knacks.

Some items have an obvious use, while others…well, the usefulness is in the eye of the buyer. “We find Pinterest has helped us a lot,” says Jarvis. “We can’t keep a door knob in-stock because people use them [to make] coat racks. People come here because they know they can’t get [these things] new. So it makes some really, fun unique things.”

“It’s better than Ikea!” exclaims one family friend who helps out at the store. This eclectic shop, as well as its eccentric team, makes Second Chance a fun place to get lost for the afternoon.

Another fun place to get lost antiquing is Fairmont Antiques & Mercantile. From the outside, it appears to be a retro-candy store, but venture a little further inside, and you soon discover that the shop not only appeals to your sweet tooth but to the sweet memories of your childhood and beyond.

“We specialize in an experience,” says General Manager Mark Kocsis. “When people come in, we like to give them a big ‘Wow!’” Owner Larry Richling opened the shop in the old Fairmont Dairy building at 1209 Jackson St. nearly three years ago, combining his retro-candy business and his antique business into a one-stop wonder-shop.

Along with the candy shop, the store offers many kinds of sodas, “Mostly retros and things you haven’t seen in years.” Deeper into the shop, customers will find treasures that will immediately transport them back to a simpler time.

This store offers more than antiques—it offers nostalgia: record albums, posters, toys, classic metal lunch boxes, clothing, furniture, even classic signage and historical hometown memorabilia. After you’re done shopping, take time to enjoy the authentic soda fountain or catch a classic film in the store’s private movie theater.

“If you just sit here and watch people come in…boom! They get this huge smile on their face,” says Kocsis. “That is so neat to see.” With items from over 25 dealers and new pieces coming in daily, visiting Fairmont will be a new experience each and every time you walk through the door.

Antique Annex
1125 Jackson St.
402-502-9603
omahavintage.com

Second Chance Antiques
1116 Jackson St.
402-346-4930
secondchanceantiquesomaha.com

Fairmont Antiques & Mercantile
1209 Jackson St.
402-346-9746
omahafairmont.com

Harvest Fun

Fun festivals don’t end when autumn rolls in—there is still plenty to do in Nebraska as the dog days of summer draw to a close and the school year begins.

Harvest festivals are a great way to celebrate the end of summer and the transition to a new season. It’s a time to enjoy the prosperous crop and an exposition for the year’s produce. Many communities statewide celebrate the harvest with their own autumn festivals.

Nebraska City’s 45th Annual Applejack Festival is one such festival. The whole family can enjoy a parade, a car show, and an arts and crafts fair from September 20-22. If activities are what you’re looking for, participate in the Fun Run/Walk, boogie at the AppleJam Carnival street dance, and stop by Kimmel Orchards or Arbor Day Farms to pick your own apples and feast on homemade apple pies and sweets.

And there’s more than just apples. You can pick your own produce at Roca Berry Farm in Roca, Neb., Martin’s Hillside Orchard in Ceresco, Neb., or Bloom Where You’re Planted Farm in Avoca, Neb. Kids will love scouring fields for pumpkins, picking raspberries, taking in the sights on hayrack rides, eating caramel apples, and exploring all kinds of farm-related activities.

After you’ve enjoyed the state’s fall harvest festivals and picked your bounty, head to one of Nebraska’s state parks for cool autumn events. Visit Mahoney State Park and gaze at the stars on August 16 and September 13, or listen to and tell great stories on September 14 at the 11th Annual Moonshell Storytelling Festival.

If adventure is what you’re looking for, head up to Ponca State Park September 21–22 for the 9th Annual Missouri River Outdoor Expo to learn about wildlife-related and outdoor recreation activities including wildlife viewing, fishing, hunting, archery, shooting sports, camping, off-highway vehicle recreation, and boating recreation.

The season may change, but the fun doesn’t have to stop!

Go to VisitNebraska.com to find more festivals and events to make your autumn truly festive.

The Best, Local Farmers Markets

July 22, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Krisha Goering has made a weekend visit to the farmers market a summer tradition for the last four years. The Millard mom, who often takes her own mother along for a little girl time, enjoys spending an hour or so each Sunday morning walking the farm stands at the Aksarben Village market and buying the bulk of the fresh groceries she’ll need for her weekly menu and beyond.

The veteran shopper says she heads to market each week with an action plan. “I know exactly what I’m going to get when I get there. I make a swing through the market with $20, and when it’s gone, it’s gone,” Goering says.

“I typically buy whatever’s in season. At the beginning of the summer, that’s asparagus and a variety of lettuces. Eggs are abundant [early summer], so I eat a ton of them, too. Come August and September, when the harvests are plentiful, I buy tomatoes two or three cases at a time for canning, and I grab a couple of bushels of green beans to freeze. I also buy cucumbers for canning pickles, as I haven’t had much luck growing [cucumbers] in my own garden.”

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Goering says she buys her fruits and veggies at the farmers market whenever possible, preferring locally-grown over store-bought, organic produce in almost every instance. “They’re simply more fresh and more nutritious. Store-bought goods just don’t ripen the same or taste the same.”

Visiting with her favorite vendors, some of whom she now considers her friends, is one of the perks of frequenting the same market each week, Goering says. “We chit-chat a bit, talk about our kids, share a little news…” she says. “These [farmers] are quality people. They work many hours a day and grow and sell wonderful product. I really respect them. But I don’t want to occupy too much of their time visiting, as I know they’re aiming to make new clients and I don’t want to cost them business.”

Omaha shoppers are fortunate in that they have three large outdoor markets from which to choose, all accessible by bus, bike, car, or foot. The Omaha Farmers Market at 11th and Jackson streets in Downtown Omaha is open every Saturday from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The Historic Old Market, which served as a city market for local produce vendors over a century ago, today offers more than 100 vendors selling everything from fruits and veggies and baked goods and dog treats, to teas and coffees and jewelry and toys. Great Harvest Bread, The Tea Trove, Big Kahuna Kettle Corn, and Cibola are a few of the names you’ll see each week.

The same group of sponsors that produces the Downtown Omaha market also organizes the farmers market held each Sunday at Aksarben Village, 67th and Center streets. More than 85 vendors participate in this market, which offers much more than produce as well. Goods from Goodrich Pottery, Honey Creek Creamery, and Soup-n-More can be found alongside fruits and vegetables from Birdsley Road Blueberries, Shadowbrook Farms, and Hillside Orchard, among many others.

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Both Omaha Farmers Market ventures participate in SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), which helps financially strapped families afford healthy food options.

A third farmers market is hosted Saturdays all summer long on the south side of Village Pointe Shopping Center, 168th and West Dodge Road. A wide variety of produce from farmers within a 150-mile radius is available, as well as food and gift items from Jisa Farmstand Cheese, C&C’s Bzzz Honey, Dance in the Wind Iris Garden, and dozens of other retailers. The shopping center hosts a fun family event, Harvest Fest, on the final day of the market October 5.

Browsing the flowers, arts and crafts, yummy treats, and unique gift items at the farmers market can make for a fun, leisurely outing for some shoppers. But for health-conscious grocery shoppers like Goering—there for the fine, locally grown produce and foods and not much else—here are several tips that can help produce a fruitful visit. (Sources: Krisha Goering, tasteofhome.com, and localfoods.about.com).

  • Go early for best selection of produce, thinner crowds, and to beat the summer heat. Go late for (again) thinner crowds and the best deals; some farmers discount items at the end of the day to avoid hauling them home.
  • If you’re new to the market, make a swing through just to get an overview of what’s there. (Some markets offer a map of vendors.) Don’t buy at the first stand you see; you may find better goods cheaper down the line and have buyer’s remorse.
  • Bring your own reusable bags. Reinforced plastic or canvas bags work best and make carting produce around more convenient. If you’re buying a lot, bring a wheeled cart.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and sunscreen and bring a water bottle and your patience. You may have some waiting in line to do, and not all areas are tented with shade.
  • Be considerate of other shoppers. Don’t overstay your welcome at a busy stand, block the roadway with a huge stroller, or allow your dog to invade others’ personal space. Shopping in small groups is recommended.
  • Get to know your vendors during the market’s downtime. They may offer great food prep or cooking advice, share recipes, or give referrals to other vendors you’ll enjoy. They might also share their growing techniques or food philosophy.
  • If you’re looking to not break the bank, set a budget and stick to it. Make your grocery list beforehand and avoid impulse buys.
  • Respect the vendors. Selling their goods is their livelihood, and a farmers market is not a flea market. Don’t haggle on price. If you’re not willing to pay it, politely move on.

For more info on farmers markets in Omaha, visit OmahaFarmersMarket.com or VoteRealFood.com.

Local Farmers Markets

Omaha Farmers Market—Old Market

11th & Jackson streets

May 4 – October 19

Saturdays 8am-12:30pm

Omaha Farmers Market—Aksarben Village

67th & Center streets

May 5 – October 20

Sundays 9am-1pm

Village Pointe Farmers Market

South side, Village Pointe Shopping Center

168th & W. Dodge Rd.

May 4 – October 5

Saturdays 8am-1pm