Tag Archives: primer

BB and CC Creams

September 24, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

You may have seen the commercials with actress Kate Hudson and other makeup-brand personalities talking about their revolutionary BB and CC creams. You might also have thought, “I have no idea what those words mean.”

That’s because BB and CC creams are fairly new to Americans—or at least to most Americans in the Midwest.

The original version of what is now BB Cream was created in the 1960s by German dermatologist Dr. Christine Schrammek to protect and heal the skin of her patients. Eventually, the cream found its way into Korea and Japan in the 1980s and was advanced. In fact, BB cream became the well-kept beauty secret of many Asian celebrities. Now, however, these creams are a huge hit in practically every beauty market across the world, including our own.

Still, most people don’t exactly know what the creams are (or, more importantly, what they do). Fortunately, Joel Schlessinger, M.D., FAAD, FAACS, of LovelySkin in Omaha has the answers.

First of all, BB Cream stands for “beauty balm,” and CC Cream stands for “color corrective.” Again, these words might mean little if you don’t know what balms and color correctors do.

According to Dr. Schlessinger, BB is a multitasking cream that serves as a moisturizer, primer, foundation, and even sunscreen. CC also functions in several ways, providing the same benefits as BB but with an added bonus: color correction. For women with uneven skin tone, acne, or redness, CC seems to be the better option.

“CC creams can be very beneficial for acne-prone or oily complexions due to their lighter formulation and full coverage,” Dr. Schlessinger adds. “Investing in a good CC cream can shorten your daily routine, enhance your skin’s appearance, and prevent premature aging.”

So what’s the main difference between the two creams? “Coverage and weight,” says Dr. Schlessinger. “CC creams tend to be lighter with better coverage while BB creams are heavier and typically don’t offer full concealing benefits.”

Of course, both save you money and time. For example, one CC cream can replace foundation, moisturizing cream, facial primer, sunscreen, and concealer. Let’s face it—anything that shortens a daily beauty routine and lessens makeup expense is greatly appreciated.

Wondering where you can get BB and CC creams? Pharmacies, grocery stores, makeup outlets, skin care retailers, online shopping—they’re everywhere. Budget-friendly brands like Almay, Clinique, Garnier, and L’Oreal have begun releasing their own versions. Makeup store Sephora carries several professional makeup brands. And, of course, Dr. Schlessinger’s LovelySkin sells brands like Supergoop!, jane iredale, Stila, Dr. Brandt, Dr. Dennis Gross, and B. Kamins.

LovelySkin is located near Oak View Mall at 2929 Oak View Drive. For more information about these products, visit lovelyskin.com.

Public Art Primer

June 20, 2013 by
Photography by Chris Wolfgang

One thing never in short supply in this city of ours is public art. Downtown Omaha in particular has a vast collection of pieces—some you’ve surely seen and some that are tucked away. Keep your eyes open this summer for these few pieces in particular and impress your friends with how much you know about public art downtown.

Pioneer Courage Park and Spirit of Nebraska’s Wilderness Park
14th & Capitol and all four corners of the 16th & Dodge intersection

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Both owned by First National Bank, these installations span the width of several blocks. Follow Blair Buswell’s and Edward Fraughton’s pioneers, covered wagons, oxen, horses, and mules through Pioneer Courage Park, watch as they scare off bison who run along 14th all the way to Kent Ullberg’s Spirit of Nebraska’s Wilderness at 16th where Canada geese (each weighing approximately 200 pounds) seem to fly around the intersection, through walls, buildings, even traffic light poles.

The Garden of the Zodiac
Old Market Passageway, 10th & Howard

On the second floor of the Old Market Passageway (itself a unique artistic and architectural element of Downtown Omaha) are several bronze heads mounted on stone bases. This Garden of the Zodiac was sculpted by Evas Aeppli and represents the 12 signs of the Zodiac. Aeppli also created the Fountain of Erinnyesdiac in the lower level of the Passageway across from the V. Mertz restaurant. These three abstract metal heads, which each spew water, represent the Furies: Alecto, Megaera, and Tisiphone, all vengeful demi-goddesses of Greek mythology.

Nebraska Centennial Glass Mosaic
The outside of the Woodman building, 18th & Douglas

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Tom Bartek completed this work in 1967. The mosaic scenes depict Native Americans, pioneers, and Omaha being settled. In 2012, at the age of 80, Bartek released Retrospective, a collection of his works, in three galleries. You can learn more about the mural’s creation at omahamuralproject.org.

Fertile Ground
Eastern wall of the Energy Systems, Inc. building, 13th & Webster

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If you’ve been in the North Downtown area since 2009, you’ve seen Fertile Ground. This 70-foot-tall mural spans 328 feet wide—the length of a city block. It is the largest piece of public art ever installed in Omaha. It’s also the largest mural in the nation to have a single financial backer, the Peter Kiewit Foundation, which funded the piece as a gift to the people of Nebraska and the city of Omaha.

The Omaha Mural Project: Fertile Ground was coordinated by the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, which selected Meg Saligman as the artist. Saligman compiled Omaha’s story—past, present, future—in a unique back-to-front approach. Instead of a typical left-to-right treatment, the chronology pushes past events to the background and brings more recent events into the foreground. The painting took a year to complete—June 2008 to June 2009.

The Road to Omaha
TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, 1200 Mike Fahey St.

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You may have seen this piece recently, either in person or on television. This bronze sculpture by artist John Lajba is often a focal point during the NCAA Men’s College World Series every June. The sculpture of baseball players was given to the city by local organizing committee College World Series of Omaha, Inc. The Road to Omaha was completed in 1999 and made the move from Rosenblatt Stadium to TD Ameritrade Park Omaha in 2011.

For more information about public art in Omaha, visit publicartomaha.org.