Tag Archives: planning

Vernetta Kosalka

January 20, 2017 by
Photography by Ani Luxe Photography

This sponsored content appears in the Winter 2017 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/b2b_0217_125/56

Being trusted with the most important day of a couple’s life or executing the planning of companies event or non-profit’s gala is humbling,” says event planner & designer Vernetta Kosalka, who began her first business in 2007. “In 2013, I added floral design services, the brand, Florist of Omaha, specializing in wedding and event design.

“Also in 2013, I began working with a committee to plan the Omaha Police Officer’s Ball, which ignited my passion for planning and designing full-time. We work annually to raise funds benefiting Special Olympics Nebraska.”

She turned her attention to helping nonprofit and corporate groups.

“I want to have a legacy known for being a trusted source in the management of events and design, helping nonprofits reach their goals. Additionally, I want to be known for giving back to the Omaha community by helping women realize their potential and leadership.”

She has realigned her business and services, additionally offering corporate/nonprofit event planning and design services. All services are aligned under the name, “VK Events | Floral | Planning.”

“I know couples and companies have a choice, and I am so thankful they choose me and my services to assist them,” says Kosalka. “Our clients appreciate and need professional help to guide the planning process.”

“Nearing the end of my senior year at College of Saint Mary, I landed a job at one of Omaha’s largest full-service hotels as a catering administrative assistant, assisting one of Omaha’s leading and sought-after event professionals.”

She says her company is a one-stop shop for couples and clients. “I also pride myself in taking an active role with my nonprofit and corporate clients by being active on the committee and boards. Therefore I fully understand the goals and guide the planning process internally.”

Her service and attention to detail keep referrals coming. “I take the planning off your shoulders but not out of your hands. My couples and clients know I will work hard to anticipate needs, follow through on responsibilities and protect their interests.”

She is the first in her family to graduate from college. “A quote that stands out to me most is by Catherine McAuley, ‘No work is more productive of good to society than the careful education of women.’”

Kosalka holds a Master of Science in organizational leadership from the College of Saint Mary, She received the college’s Queen of Heart Award based on values, character, and service.

And that’s not all of her bragging rights. She has received the Wedding Wire Couple’s Choice Award annually for Event Planning and Floral Design. She is the recipient of the 2016 Volunteer of the Year for the Ralston Chamber of Commerce.

“Our design work is regionally published in Nebraska Wedding Day Magazine: home of award winning services—The Wedding Planner Omaha LLC & Florist of Omaha,” she says.

“As a child, I knew I wanted to own businesses and plan events. ‘Wow’ that’s a big picture for a 7 year old,” says Kosalka. “Many of America’s greatest businesses were started in homes with a dream and faith.”

801 S. 75th St.
Omaha, NE 68114
402.510.2241
vernettakosalka.com

 

Does your family have a fire escape plan?

February 15, 2014 by

With the winter months upon us, families nestle in their homes trying to stay warm, spending time by the fireplace and preparing comfort foods. As the temperature drops, residential house fires occurrences rise. Several factors contribute to the increase, including the use of personal heating devices, candles, and unattended cooking equipment.

Knowing how to prevent household fires, along with what to do when a fire occurs, will be beneficial to your family when every minute matters.

Start with prevention

The National Fire Prevention Association suggests your family start with the basics by:

  • Checking your household smoke detectors monthly;
  • Replacing batteries in smoke detectors annually;
  • Ensuring that your house or building number is visible from the street;
  • Memorizing the emergency phone number to the fire department;
  • Ensuring all exits are properly working and free of obstructions, specifically windows;
  • Designing a home fire escape plan.

They also recommend that families conduct a fire safety walkthrough of their home monthly to eliminate any potential fire hazards such as overloaded electrical circuits or faulty wiring.

Have a basic plan

Boys Town Pediatrics knows that developing a plan is important for those times when seconds are critical. Making a family fire escape plan can be a great opportunity to remind children about the importance of safety. Designing a fire escape plan can be easy with the following steps:

  1. Make a map of your house’s layout, showing all windows and doors.
  2. On the plan, make note of two exits out of every room, including the quickest exit outside.
  3. Pick a meeting spot outside the house where the family will gather after an emergency happens.
  4. Go over the basics in fire safety such as staying low to keep out of the smoke, never opening doors that are hot to the touch, and how to find the most immediate and safest route out.

Test the plan

The best way to ensure your plan will work is to hold a fire drill. Inform the family that there will be a fire drill within the next week. Waking your child in the middle of the night may be alarming, but we advise planning a drill in both the evening when it is dark as well as during the day.

After the mock drill, tweak your plan as needed. Remember to revisit the family fire escape plan every six months or after a child has changed rooms.

For more information on fire prevention and safety, visit the U.S. Fire Administration website at www.usfa.fema.gov.

The Art of Architecture

December 27, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

When asked about the design principles behind his contemporary, DIY home, Joel Holm employs a more-than-pregnant pause. Finally collecting his thoughts, he borrows—intentionally or otherwise—from Monty Python’s Flying Circus.

“The idea,” he says, “was to do…something completely different.”

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But there is so much more than “something completely different”—as dramatic as it is in this case—about the plot of land just a few doors south of Leavenworth on 52nd Street. The home, which he shares with his wife, Melissa, and their three children, is something of a forever-in-progress DIY project for Holm. He built most of it himself. More than just a basement workshop tinkerer with a table saw and tool belt, Holm is a remodeler whose H Aesthetics business recently merged with Workshop Unknown.

The design vision for the home and everything that followed became for the Holms an exercise in 
simple living.

“I’ve often thought about why we use this material instead of that material in homebuilding,” Joel explains, “especially when it would be cheaper, friendlier to the environment, and would last a heck of a lot longer if we used what we normally think of as industrial materials—and used them in new ways.”

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Square Hardie Board panels form a blocky geometrical array on the home’s exterior. Affixed with rivets that are proudly left visible and with the material’s aquamarine hue, the home almost takes on the vibe of a vintage seafaring vessel, that of an algae-encrusted steamer or battleship. Abutting those lines and introducing a contrasting motif is corrugated, recycled roofing material in red. The material’s striated ridges disrupt the cube theme that could otherwise dominate the façade. Adding to the industrial look are heated cement floors, commercial windows, and a CMU, cinder block-style 
block foundation.

Reclaimed strips of acrylic ingeniously incorporated into the pivoting front door create a dramatic, twice-daily light show. Viewed from inside the home, the morning sun streams through the door’s acrylic insets. At night and from curbside, the home’s interior lighting hits the slats in reverse fashion. The overall effect is that of electrified neon, and it takes closer examination to discern that there is nothing more at play here than beams of filtered light.

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A passerby’s first impression may be that the boxy, 3,500 square-foot home is a volcano of “contemporary” erupting in the brick-clad charm of the surrounding Elmwood Park neighborhood. But take a step back for a wider view, and you’ll notice that the Bauhaus-ish lines of the home subtly mirror those of the Prairie-esque ones of the property next door to the south.

“We didn’t have any particular architectural influence in mind with the design of this home. When I think of what we did here, it is that this is a just a better way to build a house,” he says of the home that was showcased in the 2011 Green Omaha Coalition Tour.

“Too many homes, to us, look alike,” adds Melissa. “After awhile, traditional homes built with traditional materials all tend to be 
the same.”

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The master bedroom suite is located on the main level while the kids’ bedrooms occupy the upper level. Instead of a standard hallway in a home where nothing standard is to be expected, the children’s bedrooms are connected by a wide concourse that acts as a play and study area all their own. Oversized sliding bedroom doors provide alone time in this most open and airy of settings.

“Having it be a very open space was important to us,” says Melissa. “It’s a lot of house, especially when compared to where we came from [only blocks away]. Our previous home was very quaint and charming, but it was cut up into too many individual rooms. When company came or when we had parties in the old house, it was always that awkward sort of arrangement where four people would have to be seated in another room and then a few more would be tucked around the corner from there.”

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Initial construction of the home designed in collaboration with architect Eddy Santamaria of Contrivium Design + Urbanism spanned almost two years.

A walking club made up of seniors from Elmwood Tower, a nearby independent living facility, peppered Joel with questions almost daily as work progressed. “I could have talked to them all day about what we were building,” he quips. “I’m sure I lost a month in the construction process talking to them.”

“And we were both surprised how much most of them liked it,” Melissa adds. “We had thought that older folks might not get it—might not get what we were doing—because even a lot of younger people don’t get it. People either love it,” she says with a shrug, “or hate it.”

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Such major additional projects as a fireplace are planned as time allows sandwiched in between a busy schedule of school and other activities for daughters Avery (7) and Kinley (15) and son Kaleb (12).

The Holms are also thinking about getting around to doing something with a pair of “doors to nowhere,” ones  that will eventually lead to a yet-to-be-built deck in one case and balcony in the other.

Mirroring the contours of a softly sloping lot, the home has six distinct levels plus a basement. To travel from the mudroom at the rear of the house to the front door, for example, it is a gradual one-two-three ascent of gently rising levels. In between, the space is full of subtleties that serve to break up the right angles that are otherwise everywhere to be found. A mini-flight of steps leading from the living room down to the kitchen area, for example, is sliced into a wedge configuration. The continuity of the open living room/kitchen space is never completely severed, Joel explains, but is instead merely interrupted in a way that delivers a sense of “roomness” between the two.

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The centerpiece of the kitchen is a custom table crafted by Workshop Unknown. Its acrylic surface and arcing, birch-laminated legs complement the acrylic and birch found elsewhere throughout the home.

“It’s such a simple and elegant wood,” Joel says of the birch, “and it’s a lot cheaper than many of your other choices.”

Expansive walls of glass in the main living area make for wide-open vistas but took some getting used to, Melissa says, especially when the family first moved in.

“We had people showing up outside and cupping their hands against the glass to get a look inside,” she chuckles. “They must have assumed it was a dentist’s office or something like that because our home is so different from everything else around here. I’d be reading a book or watching TV, and I’d catch some movement out of the corner of my eye, and there’d by some guy making nose prints on my windows!”

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If the home was in any danger of feeling cold or sterile, works by area artists and beyond lend a warm and vibrant touch in a color palette grounded in organic ochres.

“That was also an important driving force in planning our home,” says Joel. “We knew we wanted a place where we could display a lot of art, some of it on a pretty large scale.”

Everything about the lines, forms, and spatial composition of the Holms’ place suggest an acute attention to the art of architecture and the architecture of art.

“We do consider the house a work of art,” Joel explains as Melissa nods in agreement. “It’s something of a living sculpture but a very functional one for our family.”

Family Vacation Tips

June 20, 2013 by

Family vacation is a great opportunity to spend quality time together and create long-lasting memories. Get the most from your family vacation with a couple of quick tips from Boys Town Pediatrics.

Packing 

Make a list a couple of weeks before your vacation. Add to it as you remember items your family will need. Make sure to include:

  • Essential paperwork—pack plane tickets, health insurance cards, passports, and identification cards in a watertight baggie.
  • First-aid kit—include Ibuprofen, sunscreen, bug spray, prescription medications, band-aids, contact solution, antiseptic, Pepto-Bismol, sewing kit, disposable wipes, etc.
  • Back-up luggage—take precaution in case of lost luggage by packing a set of clothing, toiletries, and essentials in your carry-on.

Traveling

Discuss the travel arrangements and planned activities with your family. The anticipation of riding in an airplane or stopping to see the waterfall will keep them focused on what is to come instead of long travel times. Other travel tips include:

  • Bringing a reading or activity book or audio book.
  • Playing a game. See who can spot the most license plates from different states or bring cards for the plane ride.
  • Watching a movie. Have each child pick from a pre-selected group of movies.
  • Planning stops along the way. Sightseeing can prevent restlessness and unnecessary stopping.
  • Keeping busy during long layovers. Try to find the children’s play area or watch planes ascend and descend through the windows.

If you are traveling abroad, make sure to check the United States Embassy website for the country you are visiting. On the site, you will find information about required immunizations, travel advisories, and how to register your trip. It is also suggested to leave a copy of your passport back in the United States, so if your passport is lost, the information can be retrieved.

Meal Time

All the activities your family will do will keep everyone busy but also hungry. By pre-planning your family’s meals, you will save money and keep everyone going for the whole vacation. Fuel your family’s hunger by:

  • Carrying along pre-packed, filling snacks.
  • Bringing bottled water or a refillable drink container.
  • Planning a picnic instead of eating out every meal.
  • Picking out a few local treats to prevent too many sweets.

Making Memories

Make the most of your family vacation budget by booking tickets, excursions, and rentals in advance. Choose a few larger activities and leave room for free time, exploring, and relaxation. Consider free activities that include:

  • Hiking a trail or walking the beach.
  • Swimming at the hotel pool.
  • Bringing bikes and pedaling around town.
  • Checking out local events and activities.

Most of all, enjoy your vacation, relax, and make memories that your family will remember for a lifetime.

Retirement Planning To-Do

I know a doctor who is thinking about retirement. He’s not overly concerned about his future. But his retirement is five years away.

The No. 1 factor, in my opinion, affecting anyone’s retirement savings is inflation. Inflation is relatively tame at the time of this writing, but it can still be harmful—even if you plan to retire in five years. So, here’s what I suggest:

1. Don’t quit on stocks. “To achieve returns to sustain a 30-year retirement, you need to still be investing for growth,” states Money magazine in its “Retirement Guide 2013” series published last October. If stocks make you nervous, then finding a way around that concern could be difficult. According to Bankrate.com, one-year CDs offer a 0.76% pre-tax yield. Money market accounts pay 0.49% per year. Yields on two-year U.S. Treasury bonds are even worse: 25%. (Figures through November 13, 2012.) You’d lose out to inflation if all you had in your portfolio were low-yielding investments. So, if you’re near retirement, based on your risk tolerance time horizon, I’d likely recommended a stock investment allocation of 30-40%.

2. Wait before taking Social Security. In general, most individuals should delay receiving their Social Security benefits. Money states that your payments can be 76% higher if you begin taking them at age 70 instead of at age 62. “Your payment will increase by about 6% a year for every year you delay filing before your full retirement age (between age 66 and 67 for most folks),” Money claims. “After that, holding off earns you another 8% a year until age 70.” Of course, your decision as to when to retire is a personal one. What’s best depends on a number of factors, such as your current cash needs, your health and family longevity, whether you plan to work in retirement, whether you have other retirement income sources, your anticipated future financial needs and obligations, and, of course, the amount of your future Social Security benefit. See Publication No. 05-10147, “When To Start Receiving Retirement Benefits,” at socialsecurity.gov to learn more.

3. Consider taking spousal benefit Social Security income early. Assuming your spouse is 62 and has been the lower income earner, and you are 62, you could file for benefits and postpone collecting them until you turn 70. Your spouse can begin collecting 50% of your benefit right now. See “Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse” at at socialsecurity.gov.

4. Plan your retirement health care. If you retire before Medicare kicks in at 65, you could have a big expense ahead. “For a 62-year-old couple with one spouse in ill health,” states Money, “premiums run up to $2,300 a month on the individual market.” Ask your financial planner about bringing in a health insurance specialist, or look for an independent agent at nahu.org. Check with your company’s human resources department. You may be able to buy health care coverage when you retire. Remember that long-term care insurance will run about $4,000 a year for a couple in their early 60s, states Money. But if your assets total more than $1.5 million, I say pay for your long-term care as you go.

5. Line up some income. Want to consult? Now’s the time to gather clients and stay abreast of your field. You could also buy an annuity, which is a contract between you and an insurance company that pays out income and is designed for retirement purposes. Finally, practice living within your retirement income budget today. Doing so grounds your retirement planning in reality.

Jerome “Joe” P. Bonnett, Jr., CFP®, ChFC®, is an Independent Wealth Manager and President of Bonnett Wealth Management, Omaha. He is a 1987 graduate of the University of Nebraska with a bachelor’s degree in business administration, finance, and banking. He is a Registered Representative of Securities America, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. Bonnett resides in Omaha with his wife, Susan (Engdahl), and their two children, Jake and Claire. Bonnett Wealth Management and Securities America companies are unaffiliated.