Tag Archives: Orpheum Theater

Adam Devine Chugs the Big Red Kool-Aid

September 2, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

There is an all-out prank war in the office. After one of three slacker telemarketer friends/roommates got a big promotion, the other two conspired to humble his inflated ego (by stealing the car keys and clamping a bike lock around his neck before an important client meeting). 

While pretending to be busy as their distraught bud arrives late to the office, Adam Devine—playing his character Adam DeMamp in the Comedy Central series Workaholics—makes a passing reference to his home state over the phone: “I’m gonna go ahead and get two dozen throwing stars out to your residence in Bellevue, Nebraska. You’re gonna enjoy that, Mr. Johnson. Thank you, OK, I love you, too.” he says before hanging up. Then the on-screen office pranking escalates further.

The throwing stars reference was merely a small personal touch to the ridiculous storyline of  “The Promotion,” the fourth episode in season one of a series dedicated to zany office antics and often-intoxicated misadventures of three cubicle-mates (played by Devine and his real-life friends, roommates, and co-creators of the show). Name-dropping Bellevue was a subtlety to the script from Devine that connects his breakout role in the show back to his roots in The Good Life. 

“It’s just specificity,” Devine says. “In comedy, it really helps—instead of just saying some generic town or being vague—to use an exact place. I know a lot of Nebraska town names, and they’re always at the tip of my tongue. It’s always fun to rep Nebraska when you get a chance, too. Why not? Go Big Red!” 

Devine’s fans in Nebraska can delight from the occasional references to Nebraska littered throughout his creative works. Meanwhile, any media-consuming Nebraskans who are unaware that the actor grew up in Omaha are likely familiar with his characters in Workaholics, the Pitch Perfect franchise, or other notable roles.

Workaholics concluded its run after seven seasons in March 2017, as Devine and his partners decided it was time to move on to other projects. A cursory look at his TV and film credits, however, shows that Devine truly is a “workaholic.” 

Between 2013 and 2018, he appeared regularly on the ABC sitcom Modern Family as “Andy.” He starred in and co-wrote Adam Devine’s House Party on Comedy Central between 2013 and 2016 (a stand-up comedy show that he co-directed and co-created with fellow “Workaholic” Kyle Newacheck), starred in Pitch Perfect 1 and 2 as the egotistical leader of an all-male a cappella group (2012 and 2015), starred opposite Zac Efron in Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (2016), voiced a mammoth in the animated film Ice Age: Collision Course (2016), voiced the Flash in The Lego Batman Movie (2017), and hosted the 2017 MTV Movie & TV Awards. But that’s only naming a few of the projects from his young yet jam-packed filmography. 

Recently, online streaming platforms have become an important avenue for finding his latest projects. Not only can viewers binge all seven seasons of Workaholics on Hulu, Netflix also released two films in 2018 that showcase his writing, producing, and directing in addition to his starring on the screen: the rom-com When We First Met (February) and the raunchy action-comedy Game Over, Man! (March). In August, after this edition of Omaha Magazine went to press, Netflix also planned to debut The Package, a film that Devine co-produced with Anders Holm, Blake Anderson, and Newacheck of Workaholics. The movie tells the story of teenagers on a camping trip that devolves into a mission to save their friend’s “most prized [anatomical] possession.” 

Of course, Devine was not always such a big-shot comedian/actor. In fact, he wasn’t even originally from Nebraska—though he considers Omaha his hometown (a fact that Omaha Magazine heartily endorses). He was born in Waterloo, Iowa, and moved to Millard when he was about 10 years old. 

“It was 1994, and we [Nebraska football] were just dominant at that time,” he says. “I remember watching the Orange Bowl with my dad and a bunch of his friends and just a bunch of people from the neighborhood, and just being in awe of how much people loved the Huskers and how much it meant for people and how exciting it was to put on all the gear [red-and-white shirts with the team’s logo] and watch the Huskers play.”

If the Huskers had sucked, Devine admits, he might not have been such an enthusiastic convert. But it was like watching Michael Jordan play for the Chicago Bulls. “It was fun to watch because we won absolutely every time, and you know, that solidified it for me,” he says. “And now I still watch every game. I’m waiting for us to regain our glory because I already drank the Big Red Kool-Aid. Once you drink it, there’s no going back.” 

When he first moved to Omaha, he was just a kid trying to fit in. Mom-dictated fashion choices didn’t help. He had previously attended a Catholic elementary school in eastern Iowa where uniforms were mandatory—navy blue pants with a shirt tucked in—and that’s what she made him wear for his first day of class at Millard Public Schools.

“After that, I was like, ‘I’ve got to do anything I can to fit in,’” he recalls. “I noticed Husker gear was a very popular thing to wear, so I was like, ‘I have to get decked out, Mom, and she was like, ‘You’re not even a Husker fan. We’re from Iowa,’ and I’m like, ‘I don’t care, we’re buying the gear. I’m not wearing the turtleneck again.’” 

The ’94 Orange Bowl came a few months after his family’s relocation. Devine made friends and settled into the start of a stereotypical suburban Omaha childhood. Until one summer day, a collision with destiny changed his life. Destiny, in this case, was a 42-ton truck that ran him over as he crossed the street to catch up with a friend going to buy candy at a neighborhood gas station. 

Devine’s world went black. He woke up two weeks later. “They told me that I probably would have died if I didn’t have my bike on the right-hand side of my body,” he says, adding that the local news coverage of the accident showed a gnarly scene with the bike crumpled like a pretzel. “I kind of fell underneath it and got spit out, as opposed to taking the full hit myself.” 

Physical recovery was many years in the making. Although disabled in the aftermath of the accident, Devine was a sponge for the sublime awesomeness of Nebraska football in its 1990s heyday. Tom Osborne’s Huskers squads helped sustain his soul. Bedridden and incapacitated during the ’95 national championship, he was limping around on crutches by the time the Huskers clinched another national championship in ’97. Thousands of fans once again gathered in the city’s major intersections to pump their fists and shout the “Go Big Red” call and response ad infinitum. Devine was there, and he loved it.

“It was the most mayhem I’d ever seen,” he says. “What I love about Omaha—and what I love about Nebraska and the Midwest in general—is that it was mayhem, and everyone was having a great time, but everyone was so cool and so polite and really open and giving. Here I am, a little boy on crutches, and I’m crutching around out there, and no one stole my crutches to use them as timber to start a fire [laughing], which I feel in most other cities it would have been, ‘Hey kid, give me that, I gotta bash in this window and quickly steal this TV as we start this liquor store on fire.’” 

His role with Workaholics and Adam Devine’s House Party on Comedy Central would eventually make partying a visible part of his on-screen persona. But the mass of Huskers fans celebrating a national championship was his first epic party (or at least, his first big party that did not involve rollerblades, bowling, and a lot of pizza). Women were flashing boobs in jubilation. He and his friends had sneaked beer from the cooler at home and felt buzzed for the first time. He was having the time of his life. “I was such a little kid,” he says. “I didn’t really know where I was. If I wasn’t on Millard Avenue, I was probably thinking, ‘Oh my, we are MILES from home. I’m in the big city!’”

Unfortunately, he never had a chance to explore his own athletic prowess in Omaha. The cement truck of destiny smashed Devine’s dreams of advancing from peewee football to the Blackshirts of UNL. Nevertheless, he kept his athletic ambition alive by lowering the rim of his driveway basketball hoop and pretending he was Michael Jordan. Then, every year of high school, he would try out for the Millard South basketball team. 

“I really just wanted to make the team, and I tried really hard,” he says. “But our team was pretty good throughout my high school life, and I ran like a 17-minute mile at that point because I was just relearning how to walk. So there was no way that I was going to make the cut. But I tried out every year…For whatever reason, players had to buy the shoes before you actually knew if you made the team or not, so I always bought the shoes. Finally, my senior year during tryouts, the coach yelled over to me like ‘Devine!’ and I was thinking, ‘Uh oh, he’s calling me up! He’s gonna say I’m the sixth man! I’m coming off the bench, here I go!’ and he’s like, ‘You don’t need to buy the shoes.’ I’m sure my mom appreciated the brutal honesty because she did not want to buy those shoes. I still think I did, though, I still think I got that last pair.” 

In his roles in Workaholics and Pitch Perfect, Devine played characters oozing with overconfidence. These performances were shaped by his own youthful experiences deflecting hostility from occasional bullies. Humor, he found, was the great defensive strategy. 

“The thing about bullies that always made me laugh is they’re usually the dumbest guy in the room; they’re never the smartest,” he says. “It’s funny, when playing a character like that, to have this braggadocio, that confidence, when you’re really an idiot masking all your insecurities. That’s what bullies are. They’re insecure about something, and that’s why they’re lashing out. Because they don’t want everyone to think they’re not cool, or to acknowledge whatever they’re insecure about. So they mask it by bullying someone else. I played that role a lot with Adam DeMamp on Workaholics. I created the character, and I loved playing it because he was so confident. But with his friends, he would cry in front of them and be super sad and be like, ‘No one likes me!’ because that’s what he’s really thinking. But when he goes out, he tries to act like the most confident, coolest guy, which usually backfires—which is what it does for most people when they try to act like something they’re not.” 

Making gag phone calls to a now-defunct Omaha radio station, KDGE-FM 101.9 “The Edge,” gave Devine his earliest exposure to comedic performance for the general public. He was just having fun, not thinking of it as any sort of career development. But it was. 

“After I had my accident, I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t do anything,” he says. “So I would call into The Edge every day and do different voices and impressions. The DJs liked it, so I kept calling back. I would be writing bits at school in class and run home, well, not ‘run’ but aggressively crutch home or have someone push me up a hill in a wheelchair home, and then do my bits on the radio. I remember they were like, ‘Hey, you’re calling every day, we want you to be a color commentary guy on the radio station. We’ll think of bits for you to do every day and we’ll pay you. This could be your job, you call in every day anyway.’ And I was like, ‘This is great!’ so I went down to The Edge headquarters in the Old Market. My mom had to drive me all the way down there, I was 12 or 13 years old at this point and in a wheelchair. My mom pushes me in, and the guys are like, ‘What, we thought you were an adult!’ Because I never talked with them out of character, I would just be in character 100 percent of the time, and they were like, ‘Well, we can’t hire you, but what we can do is give you free concert tickets and free CDs to any events we throw.’ For the next couple of years, I got dozens and dozens of free concert tickets, which, at that age—13 and 14 years old—is better than any amount of money that they could have given. I would roll to Rockfest, Edgefest, and all the local rock shows put on by The Edge with 15 to 20 people. Which was a good way to have kids not make fun of you or punk you, since I was just getting over being crippled.”

Doing the bits on the radio gave him ammunition to negate the would-be meanness of monstrous middle schoolers. After all, the only thing these kids wanted more than making fun of someone else was getting to go to a concert for free. He had the power, like Devine intervention.  

Three different telemarketing jobs during high school, likewise, gave him more unexpected fodder for his eventual foray into mainstream comedy and his role on Workaholics. But when he was working in his cubicle, he was just trying to pass the time. 

For Professional Research Consultants, he conducted surveys over the phone for health care companies. “It was pretty straight forward,” he says. “You just had to have a polite voice on the phone, and people for the most part were like, ‘Yeah, my hospital stay was good,’ and you could take it from there. That being said, I would definitely change my voice for which part of the country I was calling. If I was calling the South, I would have a Southern accent [he says with a Southern drawl], and then if I was calling New York [he says with a Bronx accent], I would use more of a East Coast thing, and I would change my name to sound more New York. I remember my boss took me in and was like, ‘You’re doing great, just don’t change your name and your voice. You should not do that. Use your regular voice everywhere that we’re calling.’” 

Selling meat for Omaha Steaks was more difficult. “Because as much as steaks are delicious and everyone likes steak, and Omaha Steaks is a great name brand, if you’re not hungry for steak, you’re not thinking, ‘Oh, I should buy $500 in steaks right now,’” Devine says. “So it was a lot of me taking a piece of paper and wiggling it in front of the phone and going, ‘What’s this?’ and then acting like I’m talking to someone else and going like, ‘Wow, I cannot believe this. The boss just brought this to me from upstairs’—there were no upstairs; it was a one-story building—‘and we are going to give you this amazing discount.’ It was the exact same discount we were going to give everybody else. But this was my sales technique, and it worked.” 

The third of his telemarketing jobs was the worst. It was a company that sold everything from knives to Time-Life Books over the phone. “That was the worst phone job because, have you ever wanted to buy a Time-Life Book in your life? No. No one has,” he says imagining the poor souls who got stuck receiving the books month after month and having to scatter them around the house everytime Grandma came to visit. Grandparents, it seems, were a solid target for sales.   

There were classes that helped his comedy and acting career along the way, too. He enrolled in the theater arts program at Millard South during his freshman year. But it wasn’t until his junior year that he began to take the school’s theater program more seriously.

“My drama teacher at Millard South High School, Robin Baker, was just awesome,” Devine says. “She was cool, and she knew people that were actually working actors in Hollywood and people who were producers and writers and people that were actually doing it—not just on the small level, but actually making careers out of it.” 

Baker helped him to believe that he could do it, too. She saw that Devine enjoyed making videos, and she encouraged him by showing the videos during classes or at rehearsals. He had focused only on comedy in his first three years of high school. But, at her urging, he began to branch out from comedy to dramatic roles in his senior year.

“OK, this is what I want to do,” he realized. “My legs aren’t going to suddenly super-heal, and I’m not going to be the freak athlete that I once thought I was, so I should do something else.” So, Devine took parts in five plays his senior year. 

“She was like, ‘For comedians, the reason they’re usually funny is they have a depth of emotion that they can easily tap into, and that lends itself to being a good dramatic actor,’” Devine says of his high school drama teacher. “She gave me a shot at doing some more dramatic stuff, so I ran with it. She gave me the confidence to move out to Hollywood and pursue a real career. And to her credit, during my senior year, when I was telling my parents that I wanted to move to L.A. and try to give acting and comedy a real go, she told them that she thought that I had the chops to make it. And that gave my parents the confidence to allow me to go.”

Off to California he went. Devine applied to UCLA and was accepted, but didn’t have enough money to cover tuition. He ended up studying at Orange Coast Community College, thinking he might transfer the credits to another California university afterward. Soon after enrolling at the community college, Devine met Blake Anderson and Kyle Newacheck (two of the four core members of Workaholics).

“On day one of improv class at the community college, I just kind of clicked with them,” Devine says. “Blake, as you know from Workaholics, ends up having these long, beautiful, luscious locks that the ladies just adore. But at that time he had the cutest little afro, very Justin Guarini-esque, and he was super funny, so I kind of latched on to him and we started writing comedy together. After a couple years, I realized that I didn’t want to go to school. I wanted to do comedy full-time. Kyle, who plays Carl the drug dealer on Workaholics, who directed many of the episodes for us on Workaholics, he moved up [to L.A. from Orange County] to go to film school, and at that time I was like, ‘I’m going to move up as well and really start to take my comedy/acting career seriously.’”

Devine never graduated from Orange Coast Community College, though he speaks highly of the school. He didn’t want to take the math and science credits needed to complete a degree. He only took improv, creative writing, screenwriting, and the classes that he thought would make him better at the job he actually wanted to do. 

That strategy doesn’t work out for everyone, he admits: “I wouldn’t recommend it for everyone. But I really put my nose down. I was determined that this is what I’m gonna do, and I’m gonna do it full-steam ahead. Luckily things kind of clicked into place for me.” 

Devine intervention strikes again. Two years after moving to Orange County, the 20-year-old aspiring comedian took a job at the Hollywood Improv Comedy Club in L.A. He was just answering phones and working the door. Nevertheless, he considers it to be his first break. 

“Even though it’s not like a true Hollywood break, I got to see comics like Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, Fortune Feimster, Daniel Tosh, and all these guys from all different walks of life at the top of their game, these A-list comedians,” he says. “Second City, at that time, was connected to the Improv. It was right next door. If you worked at the Improv, you got half off of classes at Second City. So I was like, ‘This is perfect!’ I took as many classes over there as I possibly could.”

In the Second City musical improv class, Devine met Anders Holm, the fourth member of the yet-to-assemble Workaholics squad. A troupe associated with the class was planning to go on tour and do corporate gigs. Singing musical improv at the Mead Paper Corp. turned out to be Devine’s first paying comedy gig.

Devine found Holm to be like the yin to his yang, or vice versa. “He actually was the first person I met who was a writer that was serious about writing,” Devine says. “He was more serious about writing than performing, and I was kind of the other way. I was performing so often and doing stand-up every night. I think he wanted to be more of a performer, and I wanted to be more of a writer, and we sort of helped each other. We started writing together, and then he joined my class, and we started to perform together.” 

YouTube was still a new phenomenon on the internet, and Devine saw an opportunity for his comedian friends to assemble like Voltron. “So I call my old friends Blake Anderson and Kyle Newacheck. I was living with Kyle at the time,” Devine says. “I was like, ‘We need to start making videos,’” as the only comedy-focused videos he was seeing on YouTube were from Andy Samberg’s Lonely Island crew. 

“I think we came out with about 80 videos in about two years,” Devine says, “That’s when we started to get the attention of Comedy Central, because we were putting out so much stuff, and at the same time, I was doing stand-up and I started to catch the attention of Comedy Central. They had me on Live at Gotham, which was the new faces show before Adam Devine’s House Party. So that was my first TV stand-up show.” 

The Comedy Central execs started watching all of their material on YouTube—which remains available under their group’s channel, Mail Order Comedy—then Devine says they were approached: “‘Oh, you guys can actually create something. Do you have any ideas for shows?’ And we were like, ‘We sure do.’” 

Gangster-rapping wizards were going to be the next big thing in comedy. Almost. “We went through a weird period where we created an entire album of us as gangster-rapping wizards from another realm,” he says. “I mean, you can buy the album, it’s called Purple Magic, I believe it’s on iTunes still. We thought it was awesome, and we were getting great feedback, and those were our first videos that went really viral. That was right around the same time Comedy Central asked about show ideas.”

They also had done a Mail Order Comedy web series that Devine says “was basically Workaholics before Workaholics,” and the executives had expressed interest in that concept of the guys living together and working together and getting into hijinks, “and we’re like, ‘Yeah, that’s a good idea, but what’s a better idea is us as gangster-rapping wizards from another realm that come to this realm to take over the rap game.’ And they’re like, ‘What? No. That’s a horrible idea. We do not want that.’ But we kept pitching it anyway. We pitched the lower level execs; they were like, ‘Great, don’t pitch that when you go to the vice president.’ So we’re like, ‘OK,’ and then we pitch it to the vice president, and they’re like, ‘Great, you’re going to pitch the president next week, do not pitch the wizard rap,’ So then we go there and we pitch Workaholics; she’s loving it, she’s like, ‘This is a really great idea. We’re excited about this.’ Then we pull the rug out from under ourselves, and we’re like, ‘Well, it’s great you’re excited about that, but what we really wanna do is…’ and pitch her the wizards. And she’s like, ‘No, we’re not doing that.’ Well, thank God the execs at Comedy Central were nice enough to just not go, ‘OK, you know what, just leave. Don’t come back. We’re trying to give you your shot, but you won’t shut up about wizards.’”

Whether or not the gangster-rapping wizards concept ever magically resurrects itself, Devine has remained plenty busy with other projects—minus his wand and Gandalf beard. “I’m coming off a whirlwind,” he says. “Last year I shot three movies and did a stand-up tour, a huge tour, and then I just promoted a bunch of those movies and was all over the country promoting, and went on a USO tour with my dad this last Christmas to Iraq and Afghanistan, and then went on a stand-up tour to Japan and Australia for about a month, and then here I am. This is like the first gasp of air these last couple weeks.” 

Back in his regular routine, he’s still on the grind. He describes a regular day as, “Waking up, then I usually have an interview or two, then some meetings with someone, and then I chug coffee and go do shows. I usually try to do a couple shows a night still.” 

His stand-up push is fodder for his next goal for his comedy career—a Netflix special, which Devine will be shooting this fall at the Orpheum Theater in Omaha. The discussion with Netflix was still under negotiation over the summer when Devine spoke with Omaha Magazine for this article. His desire to film the potential comedy special back in his Homaha once again demonstrates his genuine love of Nebraska. 

But that’s not all on the horizon for him. With an anticipated 2019 release on Disney’s new streaming platform, Devine stars in the upcoming family-friendly Disney film Magic Camp, where he plays a banker returning to the magic camp of his youth. 

Meanwhile, in July, HBO announced plans for a pilot for a new comedy series titled The Righteous Gemstones about a conflicted televangelist family by the name of Gemstone. Devine is signed on for the role of the family patriarch’s hardcore fundamentalist son bent on destroying Satan. 

Devine says he has several other undisclosed projects percolating, and he doesn’t see the term “workaholic” as a negative in his personal circumstances: “It’s not like I’m working so hard that I’m ignoring my family and not making it to a birthday dinner for someone I love, like ‘Sorry, he’s too busy working,’ while I’m just in the other room aggressively writing dick and fart jokes. Like, ‘I can’t make your birthday dinner! I must finish this perfect dick analogy!’ But no, I do work very hard, and that comes from being from the Midwest and having that mentality.” 

He attributes his work ethic to Midwestern parents and upbringing: “Seeing how hard my parents worked to take care of me and my sister, I knew in order to get this career up off the ground, I needed to work as hard as I possibly could. It really just comes down to, surround yourself with people that you think are smarter and more talented than you are, and then try to outwork anyone that you know. If you do that, even if you’re not the smartest or most talented, but you’re willing to work harder than anyone else you know, you can get smarter and you can get more talented. As long as you’re willing to put in the extra work. A lot of people aren’t. I used to work with some people who I thought, ‘These are the funniest people I’ve met in my life!’ and now they’re not even in the business because they weren’t willing to do the 15 shows a week and stay out until 4 a.m. driving around the country doing shows and staying up late to finish that script.”

He has worked as a comedian, writer, actor, voice actor, producer, and director for various projects over the years. But how would he like to be seen? “The thing is, I like doing all of it. I wouldn’t want to do just one thing,” he says. “I have friends that only do stand-up, that’s all they do. To me, I would get bored if I didn’t have other avenues to go down. I love acting. I love playing different roles. I would love to play some more dramatic roles, and do like Robin Williams did toward the end of his career. 

But then I also love producing, I love taking other people’s projects and ideas and using my connections that I’ve made through the years and helping them find money for the projects and actually helping get them made. I also would like to direct movies and have control over making a creative vision come to life. I love writing and coming up with this little nugget of an idea, this little morsel, and seeing it become a full-fledged movie or a TV show that has a life of its own. That is really gratifying, a very cool experience.” 

While experimenting in all aspects of creative production appeals to Devine, he also doesn’t mind letting it all hang out. Literally. As evidenced by his dropping his pants and jumping buck naked from a closet to surprise the armed mercenaries in Game Over, Man!, the Netflix film that Devine and all of his fellow Workaholics co-creators put together as a team. 

The concept for Game Over, Man! evolved from their writing “Office Campout,” their third episode of Workaholics, which first aired seven years ago on Comedy Central. The episode featured an attempted defense of their cubicle maze from nighttime invaders—inspired by the film Die Hard with psychedelic mushrooms. The plot of the Netflix film drives home the Die Hard inspiration even harder (with the trio working as hotel janitorial staff rather than telemarketers) with action combat scenes, mercenaries with automatic weapons, and a big boss, plus illicit substances. 

Did he get any grief from his parents over his family jewels flashing? “No,” he says. “I love my parents. They’re the best, they’re so supportive. My mom was sitting by me at the premiere. I was sitting in front of her actually. I didn’t want to sit right next to her. Then, as it’s happening [as his penis is bouncing on the screen], she’s going ‘Aww’ [in an affectionate motherly way], and then she kept going, ‘Well, this is funny. This is funny,’ which I think is her nervous way of not being like, ‘Ew, gross, why is my son’s dick out?’” 

Around the time that Game Over, Man! debuted on Netflix in spring 2018, the HBO series Westworld started its second season. One of the male actors in Westworld, Simon Quarterman, dropped his pants in the first episode for a full-frontal nude scene. Quarterman told New York Magazine’s Vulture that the experience was liberating and he urged other actors to try it. Well, Devine is all over that trend like a dog humping a leg. “We don’t coast,” as Omaha’s official slogan insists. We’re ahead of the curve. 

“Yeah, yeah we are,” he says with a laugh. “I’m not afraid to let it all hang out.” 

No one in the audience of the premiere was cheering “Go Big Red!” but it would have been a cute way to welcome the actor’s manicured manparts on the big screen.

Like any true Nebraskan, Devine remains a Husker fan in spite of the program’s struggles in recent years. He even had an opportunity to come and work out with the Huskers in 2016 while promoting the film Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates.

“I love going to Nebraska to promote movies,” he says. “It’s just fun for me, especially when I get to do cool stuff like going on the field and retrieving some punts—which was really much harder than it looks. Turns out, those guys are freak athletes. They gave me a jersey with my name on it, I got to run up and down the field, I got to take the passes, retrieve some punts, and I also got to go in the gym and get my swole on with the weight-training staff. Big shout-out to them, and thanks for the free gym membership. We were doing push-ups, stuff with the medicine ball, and they told me I could come back any time. I have yet to take them up on it, but I kind of want to go back for just a month and really abuse my privileges [laughing] make them be like, ‘You gotta go. We’re trying to work out here.’”

During that promo visit, he had a chance to talk one-on-one with then-Coach Mike Riley. The coach sat the actor down in his office for the recruitment talk. It was likely the closest Devine will ever comes to realizing his dream of playing for the Cornhuskers. 

“He’s a super nice guy,” he says of Riley. “You know, it’s sad because I don’t like it when people lose their jobs—they’ve got family they’re supporting, so that’s never a good thing—but at the same time, it just wasn’t clicking. It wasn’t working out…Coming off of Scott Frost’s [undefeated 2017] season at Central Florida, I think this was the right time to make the move.”  

A die-hard fan, Devine can’t conceal his excitement about coach Frost’s shakeup of the storied football program, even if it’s merely for the morale of the fans. “Who knows what’s going to happen, especially the first couple seasons,” he says. “I think we have to give him time to adjust, but just as far as excitement about the team, thinking we have a shot, that goes a long way. We’re the Huskers, baby. You can’t count us out. It’s a Frost Warning!”

He’s not alone in his outlook on the 2018 season. Devine has witnessed the excitement from fellow roving residents of the Husker Nation all around the country, even overseas. He received a reminder in his adopted home in Southern California.

“This is going to sound like I’m a fancy asshole, but I have a beach house and have a Husker flag at the end of my dock,” he says, “and just the other day, this guy kept driving past and screaming something. I didn’t know what he was screaming. Finally, after he passed the fourth time, I hear him shout, ‘GOHHHHHHHHH BIHHHHHHG REHHHHHHHD,’ and then me and all my friends—I keep a real tight Nebraska/Omaha crew—we all hollered back with the classic call and response: Go Big Red!” 


Follow Adam Devine on Instagram (@andybovine) and Twitter (@adamdevine).

This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Finding National Limelight For Local Work

May 15, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

If you’ve attended a performance or event at the Holland Center or Orpheum Theater during the past 16 years, you’ve witnessed the work of Omaha Performing Arts. If you’ve purchased tickets using Ticket Omaha, you’ve used services provided by Omaha Performing Arts. If your family or children have participated in an education program like the Nebraska High School Theater Awards or attended a community engagement program like Jazz on the Green, you’ve benefited from programming offered by Omaha Performing Arts.

Over the past 16 years, the organization has grown to reach nearly 500,000 people annually, support a budget of about $20 million, and generate an economic impact of about $40 million, making it difficult to find anyone in the Omaha area who hasn’t at some point been touched by the organization.

And the woman who has been at the helm of OPA since it was founded is president Joan Squires.

“Joan is an extraordinarily valuable asset,” says OPA Chairman John Gottschalk. “The fact that she came here when we were at the threshold of enormous growth in performing arts is fantastic. She started almost from scratch when we were getting ready to open the Orpheum [for more performances] through the Holland. It’s changed not only the volume, but the quality, of the performing arts available in this city.”

Squires has received accolades for her pioneering leadership since OPA was founded in 2002. But lately, even more national organizations and publications are noticing her continued excellence.

In spring 2017, Squires was given the Samuel J. L’Hommedieu Award for Outstanding Achievement in Presenter Management from the Broadway League in recognition of her contributions and service to the Broadway industry, and in December, she was elected to a two-year term on the national Broadway League’s board of governors. Also in December, Musical America magazine named Squires one of 30 U.S. “Movers and Shapers” for 2017. And OPA will receive the 2018 Governor’s Arts Award for Organizational Achievement at the prestigious biennial event organized by the Nebraska Arts Council.

Squires is grateful for these recognitions; however, she attributes her success and OPA’s continued success to many factors.

The two venues the organization operates—the Holland Center and the Orpheum Theater—offer the community “some of the best venues anywhere,” she says, making them a popular destination. The high quality of performances, presentations, and artists OPA brings to Omaha—Broadway, dance, jazz, popular music, family presentations, world music, and speakers—continue to draw robust audiences.

Gottschalk attributes the OPA’s quality to Squires’ management abilities.

“To start a business up from scratch is no mean feat,” Gottschalk says. “You have to manage the product, manage the costs, and you have to market the place. Joan has never failed to meet the targets that are set in our budgets.”

“When we started, there was no one in this community to present these great artists,” Squires says. “Not only do we have an organization that can support them, but when [the artists] come to Omaha they’re always amazed by the quality of venues and response of the audiences.”

Finally, the community’s support through philanthropy, ticket sales, volunteer hours, and board leadership have helped OPA establish and sustain its presence. And Squires says OPA isn’t finished growing.

Looking ahead, Squires says OPA’s biggest area of growth is in education and engagement. OPA currently partners with national organizations including Jazz at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, Disney Theatrical Group, and the Broadway League.

“We’re really developing those programs and continuing to seek out national partnerships to bring new things to young people…and also look for opportunities to further deepen and strengthen our relationships throughout the community.”


Visit omahaperformingarts.org for more information.

This article was printed in the April/May 2018 edition of B2B.

2018 May/June Performances

May 3, 2018 by

Comedy Shows
Recurring Thursdays-Saturdays at The Backline Comedy Theatre, 1618 Harney St. Primarily long-form improv, the Backline also hosts standup shows, short-form improv shows, and occasionally sketch shows. INTERROGATED, the Backline’s premiere show, recurs every Friday. Times vary. Tickets: $3-5 Thursday, $5-10 Friday and Saturday. 402-720-7670.
backlinecomedy.com

Three to Beam Up
Through May 13 at Shelterbelt Theatre, 3225 California St. Directed by Roxanne Wach, this performance tells the story of a man who believes he is the captain of a Federation starship trekking around space. His children have to fight to keep their father’s feet firmly planted on Earth. 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. 6 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets: $12 on Thursdays. $20 general, $15 students, seniors, and TAG members on weekends. 402-341-2757.
shelterbelt.org

The Mountaintop
May 4-27 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This Olivier Award-winning play of historical fiction, The Mountaintop imagines the final night in the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Times vary. Tickets: $24. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

The Best of Chicago with Brass Transit
May 5 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. The Omaha Symphony presents the ultimate Chicago experience with the eight piece band of Brass Transit, who performs flawless renditions of hits like “Saturday in the Park,” “25 or 6 to 54,” and more. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$89. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
May 5-6 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Shakespeare’s best-loved romantic comedy comes to life in the form of ballet. 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets: $27-$92. 402-345-0606
ticketomaha.com

An Evening with David Sedaris
May 7 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Master of satire and observant writer of the human condition David Sedaris is one of America’s preeminent humor writers. Hear him live and be ready to laugh. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $50-$55. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Jessica Lang Dance
May 10 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Choreographer Lang has a knack for blending modern design elements and classical ballet to create emotionally moving performances. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$45. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Omaha Symphony: The Planets
May 11-12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. From Mars, the Bringer of War, to Neptune, the Mystic, Holst depicts the planets of myth and mystery, leaving the audience breathless. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$72. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Big Canvas (Short-Form)
May 12 and 25, June 9 and 29 at various locations. Looking for the kind of improv you see on Whose Line Is It Anyway? Big Canvas performs every month’s second Saturday (The Backline at 1618 Harney St.) and last Friday (Sozo Coffeehouse at 1314 Jones St.). Times vary. Tickets: $5.
bigcanvasne.com

Mick Foley
May 15 at Omaha Funny Bone, 17305 Davenport St., Suite No. 201. Listen to this professional wrestler’s tale of the most famous match of his career. With humor and ease, Foley talks about the “Hell in a Cell” match, which made him a wrestling legend. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$75. 402-493-8036.
standupmedia.com

Wicked
May 16-June 3 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This Broadway sensation tells the untold story of what happened in Oz long before Dorothy, and from a different perspective. Times vary. Tickets: $54-$164. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Arturo Sandoval: The Dear Diz Tour
May 17 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. This renowned trumpeter and 10-time Grammy Award-winning artist brings his tour celebrating the legendary jazz master Dizzy Gillespie to Omaha. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$45. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

The City in the City in the City
May 17-June 17 at BlueBarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. After the death of her mother, Tess and a mysterious woman set off to the ancient city-state of Mastavia and together encounter strange places and people. 7:30 p.m. (Thursday-Saturday), 6 p.m. (Sunday 6/3 & 6/17), 2 p.m. (Sunday 6/10). Tickets: $30 adults, $25 students, seniors, TAG members. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Tiffany Haddish: #SheReady
May 19 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Dubbed the “funniest woman alive” by Vanity Fair, Haddish is quickly establishing herself as one of the most sought-after comedic talents in TV and film. She recently starred in the hit comedy Girls Trip. 7 p.m. Tickets: $35-$55. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Life on the Vertical with climber Mark Synnott
May 22 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Rock-climber Synnott has made legendary first ascents of some of the world’s tallest, most forbidding walls. Although he has many passions, one of Synnott’s hobbies includes sharing his life as a professional climber and explorer. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $11-$26. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Omaha Improv Festival
May 24-27 at various locations. Catch local and national comedians with improv performances and workshops at The Backline, KANEKO, The Dubliner, and Bourbon Saloon. National headliners include Kevin McDonald of The Kids in the Hall and Seth Morris of Upright Citizens Brigade. Times and ticket prices vary. 402-720-7670.
omahaimprovfest.com

Lazarus Syndrome
May 31-June 24 at SNAP! Productions, 3225 California St. Elliott has spent most of his adult life as a person living with AIDS. He struggles with the emotional toll of Lazarus Syndrome. A quiet evening is suddenly interrupted with the unexpected arrival of his brother and father, who arrive carrying homemade matzo ball soup and family baggage. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 6 p.m. for Sundays. (June 24 show is at 2 p.m.) Tickets: $20 general, $15 for students, seniors, and military (Friday-Sunday). All Thursday shows are $12. 402-341-2757.
snapproductions.com

Omaha Symphony: The Beach Boys
June 1-3 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. The one and only Beach Boys return with favorite hits like “Good Vibrations,” “California Girls,” “Surfin’ USA,” “Fun, Fun, Fun,” and more. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $29-$109. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Disney’s Newsies
June 1-3, 8-10, 15-17 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farman St. This Disney musical tells the story of Jack Kelly, a rebellious newsboy who dreams of life as an artist away from the big city. 2 p.m. or 7 p.m. depending on the date. Tickets: $22-$27. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Tom Segura
June 7-9 at Omaha Funny Bone, 17305 Davenport St., Suite No. 201. This actor/comedian/writer has become one of Hollywood’s most in demand and highly regarded talents. Segura is best known for his three Netflix specials, Completely Normal (2014), Mostly Stories (2016), and Disgraceful (2018). Times vary. Tickets: $35. 402-493-8036
omahafunnybone.com   

Omaha Symphony: Beethoven’s Ninth
June 8-9 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. At The Ninth’s premiere, a critic said Beethoven’s “inexhaustible genius revealed a new world to us.” It continues to amaze with its celebration of humanity in the “Ode to Joy.” 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$72. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Singin’ in the Rain
June 1-24 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. The classic movie musical comes to life on stage with charm, humor, and stormy weather that made it so beloved in the first place. Times. Ticket sales start April 10. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

Shakespeare On the Green: Much Ado About Nothing
June 21-24 at Elmwood Park, 411-1/2 N. Elmwood Road. A story of quick tongues and a false death kick off this Shakespearean tragedy of misunderstandings, love, and deception. Don’t forget to bring a picnic basket and seats. Times vary. Admission: free.
nebraskashakespeare.com

Sonya Clark’s Translations
June 23 at The Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 N. 24th St. Translations consists of the artist reading poems by Gwendolyn Brooks, Rita Dove, Audre Lorde, and Nikki Giovanni on the subject of hair, written in Twist—a font resembling hair clippings. The piece is performed in a beaded barber’s chair, and represents the sharing of cultural knowledge through hairdressing traditions, and the complex and fraught relations between black women’s personal and political identities. 1-4 p.m. Admission: free. 402-933-3161
u-ca.org

Choir Boy
June 26 at The Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 N. 24th St. Known most recently for his Oscar Award winning movie Moonlight, Tarell Alvin McCraney’s Choir Boy explores the intersections of black masculinity, sexuality, and respectability politics as it holds a mirror to us all, calling us to do better. 7 p.m. Admission: $20 advanced tickets/free day of show. 402-933-3161
u-ca.org

Shakespeare On the Green: King John
June 28-30 at Elmwood Park, 411-1/2 N. Elmwood Road. Pack a picnic and bring lawn chars or blankets as John must fight his family, the French, and the Pope in order to keep his throne. Times vary. Admission: free.
nebraskashakespeare.com


Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

2018 January/February Performances

December 27, 2017 by
Photography by Contributed

Spectrum Dance Theater

Spectrum Dance Theater: A Rap on Race
Jan. 9 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Based on the 1970 conversation between James Baldwin and Margaret Mead, this production enlivens the conversation on race using dance and theater. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$40. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Tammy Pescatelli
Jan. 11-14 at Funny Bone Comedy Club, 17305 Davenport St., Suite 201. Currently on the “Dirty, Sexy, Funny Tour” with Jenny McCarthy, Pescatelli is a two-time finalist on Last Comic Standing and winner of Comedy Central’s Stand-Up Showdown. Times vary. Tickets: $16-$18. 402-493-8036.
funnyboneomaha.com

Tim Allen
Jan. 12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Expect lively and outlandish stand-up comedy from funny man, TV personality, and movie icon Tim Allen. 8 p.m. Tickets: $59-$119. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

PAW Patrol Live! “Race to the Rescue”
Jan. 12-13 at Orpheum Theater, 409. S. 16th St. This production shows that “no job is too big, no pup is too small” while sharing lessons for all ages about citizenship, social skills, and problem-solving. Times vary. Tickets: $23.25-$124.25. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

The King and I at Orpheum Theater

The King and I
Jan. 16-21 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. An English governess travels to Siam to teach the king’s English (among other subjects) to the king of Siam’s children. This show features such classic tunes as “Getting To Know You,” “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello Young Lovers,” “Shall We Dance,” and “Something Wonderful.” Times vary. Tickets: $35-$99. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Feedback Reading and Workshop
Jan. 18 and 20 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. Poets Nate Marshall, Ben Wenzl, and Gina Keplinger discuss their creative process (Jan. 18, 7-9 p.m.), followed by a writing workshop (Jan. 20, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) presented by KANEKO and the Nebraska Writers Collective. RSVP to attend either event. Tickets: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

Ripcord
Jan. 19-Feb. 11 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Pranks and practical jokes abound when cantankerous Abby and chipper Marilyn are forced to share the nicest room at the Bristol Place Senior Living Facility. Times vary. Tickets: $24+ adults, $16+ students. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

Appalachian Spring & West Side Story
Jan. 26-27 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Originally titled Ballet for Martha, this Omaha Symphony performance combines Copland, Ellington, and Bernstein on one stage for a majestic performance. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$72. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Meaning of Maggie
Jan. 26-Feb. 11 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Full of relatable characters, this production is a story about how growing up is an adventure that lets us strengthen the best parts of ourselves and reaffirms the importance of family. Times vary. Tickets: $20. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Across Rhodes
Jan. 26-Feb. 18 at Shelterbelt Theatre, 3225 California St. Rhodes Bar is the only place with live music for miles. Young musician Joss is haunted by both past experiences at Rhodes and a girl named Sarah. Tickets: $20 general, $15 students, seniors (65+), and TAG members. 402-341-2757.
shelterbelt.org

Cinderella at Orpheum Theater

Moscow Festival Ballet Presents Cinderella
Jan. 27 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. The Moscow Festival Ballet returns to Omaha to perform another fairytale classic. Tickets: $20-$45. 8 p.m. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Venus in Fur
Feb. 1-25 at BlueBarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. Inspired by the 1870 erotic novel, this production follows a playwright and a young actress as they blur lines between fantasy and reality, entering an increasingly serious game of submission and domination only one of them can win. Times vary. Tickets: $30 adults, $25 seniors and students. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Andrea Gibson
Feb. 2 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. One of the world’s most celebrated LGBTQ poets, Gibson emerged at the forefront of the national spoken-word poetry scene in 2008 (winning the first-ever Woman of the World Poetry Slam). Gibson combines poetry and music in performances. 9 p.m. Tickets: $21. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

John Caparulo
Feb. 9-10 at Funny Bone Comedy Club, 17305 Davenport St. Perhaps best known as “the under-dressed everyman” on Chelsea Lately, Caparulo has since been featured on many comedy specials, and released a few of his own, along with becoming a Sirius XM fan favorite with his show The Mad Cap Hour. Times vary. Tickets: $22. 402-493-8036.
funnyboneomaha.com

Parade
Feb. 9-March 11 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This Tony Award-winning musical is based on the trial of a Jewish man wrongfully accused of murder in Marietta, Georgia, in 1913. Times vary. Tickets: $42+ adults, $25+ students. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

My Funny Valentine
Feb. 10 at IWCC, 2700 College Road, Council Bluffs. Date night just got funnier! Join comedians Pat Hazell, one of the original writers for NBC’s Seinfeld and a veteran of The Tonight Show, and Dena Blizzard, featured comic at The Laugh Factory and Gotham Comedy Club and creator of the viral video “Chardonnay, Go!” as they join forces for an evening of hilarious and heartwarming stand-up comedy. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$35. 712-388-7140.
artscenter.iwcc.edu

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod
Feb. 10-March 4 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Performed by The Rose Theater and told through non-verbal, creative movement and the words of Eugene Field’s poem, these children sail through the stars while on a fishing trip. Times vary. Tickets: $12. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

An American in Paris at Orpheum Theater

An American in Paris
Feb. 13-18 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This Tony Award-winning musical follows an American soldier and a French girl yearning for a new beginning in the aftermath of war. Times vary. Tickets: $35-$95. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

YAMATO Drummers of Japan
Feb. 14 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Celebrate the ancient art of Japanese taiko drumming in this spectacular display of physical strength as performers leap from drum to drum to create exhilarating music. 7 p.m. Tickets: $15-$32. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Emotional Creature
Feb. 14 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This production is a collection of original monologues and irresistible songs performed by a group of young women about, and for, young girls. It is a call to action, to empowering and illuminating issues women and girls face. Contains adult content. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: free. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

She Kills Monsters
Feb. 14-18 at Lied Education Center for the Arts Studio Theatre, 2500 California Plaza. This play is a comedic journey exploring the role of fantasy role-playing games. Laden with homicidal fairies, nasty ogres, and ’90s pop culture, the young playwright Qui Nguyen delivers an action-packed story that speaks to everyone’s inner geek. Times vary. Tickets: $5-$15. 402-280-2509.
creighton.edu

Murder in a Jerkwater Town
Feb. 15-24 at The Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. The year is 1873, eight years after the end of the Civil War. The tensions between the citizens have not settled, and the Ozarks are rife with poverty and banditry. Water stops—or jerkwater towns—along the rail are frequent targets. Your train has broken down in one such town. When a fellow passenger turns up dead, everybody becomes a suspect and no one is leaving until the murder is solved. 7 p.m. Tickets: $25 (dinner included). 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

White Rabbit Red Rabbit
Feb. 19 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. White Rabbit Red Rabbit is a show performed by a single actor who has never read the script before and has no idea what it’s about. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: free. 402-533-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

Rhinos, Rickshaws, and Revolutions

Rhinos, Rickshaws, and Revolutions
Feb. 20 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. National Geographic photojournalist Ami Vitale has lived in war zones, contracted malaria, and donned a panda suit to keep true to her philosophy of “living the story.” Witness the world’s surreal beauty through Vitale’s lens. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $11-$26. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Revolutionists
Feb. 21-March 3 at UNO Theatre, 6001 Dodge St. Weber Fine Arts. Go inside the mind of a feminist during the French Revolution’s Reign of Terror. This “testament to solidarity” is a girl-powered comedy that explores what could happen if four powerful women got together to oust a tyrant. Times vary. Tickets: $6-$16. 402-554-2406.
unomaha.edu

Seedfoliks at Orpheum Theater

Seedfolks
Feb. 23-March 11 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. This production features a community brought together by the work of one girl as she tries to turn the lot next to her house into a garden. Times vary. Tickets: $20. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Back to the Future
Feb. 24 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Experience the adventure again, or for the first time, as Alan Silvestri’s score is played live as the film is screened in its entirety. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

La Bohème
Feb. 24, 28 at Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Mike Fahey St. The most performed opera in Met history is the story of young Bohemians in 19th-century Paris who are willing to starve—and die—for each other. Times vary. Tickets: $24 general admission, $20 Opera Omaha, Film Streams, or Met Opera members; and $10 students. 402-933-0259.
filmstreams.org

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

This article appears as part of the calendar of events in the January/February 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

2018 January/February Calendar of Events

Photography by Contributed

Museums and Exhibits

Lines Forming
Through Jan. 7 at Darger HQ, 1804 Vinton St. Featuring artists Angie Seykora (of Omaha) and Ying Zhu (a China-Midwest transplant), this exhibit is part of a series of collaborative and experimental projects facilitated by Darger HQ. Admission: free. 402-209-5554.
dargerhq.org

Zoom into Nano at The Durham Museum

Zoom Into Nano
Through Jan. 7 at The Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This interactive exhibit allows people to see things magnified 100 million times their actual size. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $7 children (3-12), and free to members and children 2 and under. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org

Reconnect: A Juried Alumni Exhibition
Through Feb. 15 at the University of Nebraska at Omaha Art Gallery, 6001 Dodge St. Alumni of UNO will come together for this show at the campus art gallery. Former and current faculty and students will show a broad range of works. The curator is Teliza V. Rodriguez from the Museum of Nebraska Art in Kearney. Admission: free. 402-554-2796.
unomaha.edu

The Art of the Brick
Through Feb. 19 at 225 N. 12th St., Suite 120. The Art of the Brick is a global touring exhibition rated by CNN as a “Must-See Exhibition,” the first art exhibition to focus exclusively on the use of Legos as an art medium. Award-winning artist Nathan Sawaya transforms countless Lego pieces into whimsical and awe-inspiring creations. Admission: $20 adults, $18.50 seniors and military, $17.50 children. 402-933-1293.
artofthebrickomaha.com

Monarchs at the Bemis Center

Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly
Through Feb. 24 at Bemis Center, 724 S. 12th St. This exhibit takes the yearly migration path of the Monarch butterfly as a metaphor for considering themes of place, home, migration, immigration, diaspora across the Americas, transnationalism, land rights, and sovereignty. The exhibition considers aesthetic forms through mediums such as basket weaving, ceramics, dressmaking and plaster. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Pushing Boundaries: HDR at 100
Through Feb. 25 at The Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This exhibit is an homage to HDR founders and their innovations in engineering. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (age 62+), $7 children (ages 3-12), free to members and children age 2 and under. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org

photo by Lola Alvarez Bravo

Three Generations of Women Photographers
Through March 10 at El Museo Latino, 4701 S. 25th St. This exhibit features Lola Álvarez Bravo, her student Mariana Yampolsky, and photographer Cristina Kahlo. All three have ties to Frida Kahlo. Admission: $5 general, $4 students, $3.50 seniors and children K-12, and free to members. 402-731-1137.
elmuseolatino.org

Light
Through March 31 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. Visual art, performances, lectures, youth education, and hands-on creative experiences will empower visitors to see the world in a whole new light. Admission: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

Forever Forest at Omaha Children’s Museum

Forever Forest
Through April 15 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St. This national exhibit explores sustainability, selective harvesting, transportation needs, and the everyday products that are made from trees. Admission: $12 adults and children over 2, $11 seniors, free to members and children under 24 months. 402-342-6164.
ocm.org

High School Artist Show
Jan. 5-25 at Artists’ Cooperative Gallery, 405 S. 11th St. Over 15 schools from across Nebraska and Iowa will showcase their students’ best work. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Jennifer Homan
Jan. 5-26 at Modern Arts Midtown, 3615 Dodge St. This local artist often uses pastels to depict breathtaking sky scenes. She is a member of the prestigious Pastel Society of America. Admission: free. 402-502-8737.
modernartsmidtown.com

Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez
Jan. 12-March 8 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnam St., lower level. Friedemann-Sanchez describes her art as “a bicultural and transcultural experience” as it focuses on her migration from Colombia to the United States. Admission: free. 402-595-2122.
artscouncil.nebraska.gov

2018 OEAA Visual Artists Nominee Showcase
Jan. 13-27 at Petshop Gallery, 2725 N. 62nd St. Works by nominees from the Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards will be shown in this exhibit. Expect to see a variety of mediums including painting, print, installation, and more. 4 p.m. Admission: free.
oea-awards.org

Metamorphosis at Lauritzen Gardens

Metamorphosis: Works by Sayaka Ganz and Aurora Robson
Jan. 20-May 13 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. From birds to aquatic creatures to a massive vortex, Sayaka Ganz and Aurora Robson’s sculptures promote environmental stewardship while showing the potential beauty of reclaimed (once-discarded) plastic objects. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children (6-12), free for members and children under 6 years old. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Persistence: Branches, Barks & Berries by Margaret Berry
Jan. 20-May 13 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This exhibition explores the theme of persistence in nature through the winter months. Look for the sculptural beauty of bare branches, the brightness of berries, and the mesmerizing texture of barks. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children (6-12), free for members and children under 6 years old. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

I See That Fable Differently at Joslyn

I See That Fable Differently: Selections from Creighton University’s Carlson Fable Collection
Jan. 27-April 29 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. This exhibition will examine a dozen Aesop fables with a variety of objects from printed materials to ceramic dishware, assemblage sculpture, and a set of nesting dolls. A companion exhibition will be on view at Creighton’s Lied Art Gallery. Admission: free. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

Walk With Me
Feb. 1-25 at Artists’ Cooperative Gallery, 405 S. 11th St. Judith Anthony Johnston presents her first solo show at the co-op in 40 years. The show depicts one woman’s journey walking the Caminos in Spain and Portugal through the use of gold leaf, oils, and wire sculpture. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Brian Gennardo
Feb. 2-23 at Modern Arts Midtown, 3615 Dodge St. This abstract expressionist uses bold lines and vivid colors in his modern art. Admission: free. 402-502-8737.
modernartsmidtown.com

Ed Ruscha at Joslyn.

Word/Play: Prints, Photographs, and Paintings by Ed Ruscha
Feb. 3 through May 6 at the Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. The first major exhibition featuring Ruscha in his home state of Nebraska, Word/Play brings together prints, photographs, and artist books, complemented by a selection of major paintings. At turns poignant, provocative, and confounding, Ruscha’s use of the written word is a signature element of his work. Several of his images contain palindromes inscribed over mirror-image landscapes, such as Lion in Oil. Admission: $10 general, $5 students with valid ID, free to members and youth (17 and under). 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

Women in Omaha: A Biographical Sketch of Persistence through History
Feb. 3-July 29 at The Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. The Durham Museum partners with the University of Nebraska-Omaha’s History Department and Service Learning Academy to produce an immersive, interdisciplinary experience focused on the experience of Nebraska women. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (age 62+), $7 children ( 3-12), and free to members and children age 2 and under. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org

Fighting for the Right to Fight at The Durham

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African-American Experiences in World War II
Feb. 17-July 15 at The Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. What do Alex Haley, Sammy Davis Jr., Benjamin Davis Jr., and Medgar Evers have in common? They were four of the thousands of African-Americans who served in World War II. This exhibit highlights some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African-Americans during World War II, including an eight-minute video about the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors ( 62+), $7 children (3-12), and free to members and children age 2 and under. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org

Performing Arts

Spectrum Dance Theater at the Orpheum

Spectrum Dance Theater: A Rap on Race
Jan. 9 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Based on the 1970 conversation between James Baldwin and Margaret Mead, this production enlivens the conversation on race using dance and theater. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$40. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Tammy Pescatelli
Jan. 11-14 at Funny Bone Comedy Club, 17305 Davenport St., Suite 201. Currently on the “Dirty, Sexy, Funny Tour” with Jenny McCarthy, Pescatelli is a two-time finalist on Last Comic Standing and winner of Comedy Central’s Stand-Up Showdown. Times vary. Tickets: $16-$18. 402-493-8036.
funnyboneomaha.com

Tim Allen
Jan. 12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Expect lively and outlandish stand-up comedy from funny man, TV personality, and movie icon Tim Allen. 8 p.m. Tickets: $59-$119. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

PAW Patrol Live! “Race to the Rescue”
Jan. 12-13 at Orpheum Theater, 409. S. 16th St. This production shows that “no job is too big, no pup is too small” while sharing lessons for all ages about citizenship, social skills, and problem-solving. Times vary. Tickets: $23.25-$124.25. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

The King and I at Orpheum Theater

The King and I
Jan. 16-21 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. An English governess travels to Siam to teach the king’s English (among other subjects) to the king of Siam’s children. This show features such classic tunes as “Getting To Know You,” “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello Young Lovers,” “Shall We Dance,” and “Something Wonderful.” Times vary. Tickets: $35-$99. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Feedback Reading and Workshop
Jan. 18 and 20 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. Poets Nate Marshall, Ben Wenzl, and Gina Keplinger discuss their creative process (Jan. 18, 7-9 p.m.), followed by a writing workshop (Jan. 20, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) presented by KANEKO and the Nebraska Writers Collective. RSVP to attend either event. Tickets: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

Ripcord
Jan. 19-Feb. 11 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Pranks and practical jokes abound when cantankerous Abby and chipper Marilyn are forced to share the nicest room at the Bristol Place Senior Living Facility. Times vary. Tickets: $24+ adults, $16+ students. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

Appalachian Spring & West Side Story
Jan. 26-27 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Originally titled Ballet for Martha, this Omaha Symphony performance combines Copland, Ellington, and Bernstein on one stage for a majestic performance. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$72. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Meaning of Maggie
Jan. 26-Feb. 11 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Full of relatable characters, this production is a story about how growing up is an adventure that lets us strengthen the best parts of ourselves and reaffirms the importance of family. Times vary. Tickets: $20. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Across Rhodes
Jan. 26-Feb. 18 at Shelterbelt Theatre, 3225 California St. Rhodes Bar is the only place with live music for miles. Young musician Joss is haunted by both past experiences at Rhodes and a girl named Sarah. Tickets: $20 general, $15 students, seniors (65+), and TAG members. 402-341-2757.
shelterbelt.org

Cinderella at Orpheum Theater

Moscow Festival Ballet Presents Cinderella
Jan. 27 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. The Moscow Festival Ballet returns to Omaha to perform another fairytale classic. Tickets: $20-$45. 8 p.m. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

Venus in Fur
Feb. 1-25 at BlueBarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. Inspired by the 1870 erotic novel, this production follows a playwright and a young actress as they blur lines between fantasy and reality, entering an increasingly serious game of submission and domination only one of them can win. Times vary. Tickets: $30 adults, $25 seniors and students. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Andrea Gibson
Feb. 2 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. One of the world’s most celebrated LGBTQ poets, Gibson emerged at the forefront of the national spoken-word poetry scene in 2008 (winning the first-ever Woman of the World Poetry Slam). Gibson combines poetry and music in performances. 9 p.m. Tickets: $21. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

John Caparulo
Feb. 9-10 at Funny Bone Comedy Club, 17305 Davenport St. Perhaps best known as “the under-dressed everyman” on Chelsea Lately, Caparulo has since been featured on many comedy specials, and released a few of his own, along with becoming a Sirius XM fan favorite with his show The Mad Cap Hour. Times vary. Tickets: $22. 402-493-8036.
funnyboneomaha.com

Parade
Feb. 9-March 11 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This Tony Award-winning musical is based on the trial of a Jewish man wrongfully accused of murder in Marietta, Georgia, in 1913. Times vary. Tickets: $42+ adults, $25+ students. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

My Funny Valentine
Feb. 10 at IWCC, 2700 College Road, Council Bluffs. Date night just got funnier! Join comedians Pat Hazell, one of the original writers for NBC’s Seinfeld and a veteran of The Tonight Show, and Dena Blizzard, featured comic at The Laugh Factory and Gotham Comedy Club and creator of the viral video “Chardonnay, Go!” as they join forces for an evening of hilarious and heartwarming stand-up comedy. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$35. 712-388-7140.
artscenter.iwcc.edu

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod
Feb. 10-March 4 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Performed by The Rose Theater and told through non-verbal, creative movement and the words of Eugene Field’s poem, these children sail through the stars while on a fishing trip. Times vary. Tickets: $12. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

An American in Paris at Orpheum Theater

An American in Paris
Feb. 13-18 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This Tony Award-winning musical follows an American soldier and a French girl yearning for a new beginning in the aftermath of war. Times vary. Tickets: $35-$95. 402-661-8555.
ticketomaha.com

YAMATO Drummers of Japan
Feb. 14 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Celebrate the ancient art of Japanese taiko drumming in this spectacular display of physical strength as performers leap from drum to drum to create exhilarating music. 7 p.m. Tickets: $15-$32. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Emotional Creature
Feb. 14 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This production is a collection of original monologues and irresistible songs performed by a group of young women about, and for, young girls. It is a call to action, to empowering and illuminating issues women and girls face. Contains adult content. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: free. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

She Kills Monsters
Feb. 14-18 at Lied Education Center for the Arts Studio Theatre, 2500 California Plaza. This play is a comedic journey exploring the role of fantasy role-playing games. Laden with homicidal fairies, nasty ogres, and ’90s pop culture, the young playwright Qui Nguyen delivers an action-packed story that speaks to everyone’s inner geek. Times vary. Tickets: $5-$15. 402-280-2509.
creighton.edu

Murder in a Jerkwater Town
Feb. 15-24 at The Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. The year is 1873, eight years after the end of the Civil War. The tensions between the citizens have not settled, and the Ozarks are rife with poverty and banditry. Water stops—or jerkwater towns—along the rail are frequent targets. Your train has broken down in one such town. When a fellow passenger turns up dead, everybody becomes a suspect and no one is leaving until the murder is solved. 7 p.m. Tickets: $25 (dinner included). 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

White Rabbit Red Rabbit
Feb. 19 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. White Rabbit Red Rabbit is a show performed by a single actor who has never read the script before and has no idea what it’s about. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: free. 402-533-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

Rhinos, Rickshaws, and Revolutions

Rhinos, Rickshaws, and Revolutions
Feb. 20 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. National Geographic photojournalist Ami Vitale has lived in war zones, contracted malaria, and donned a panda suit to keep true to her philosophy of “living the story.” Witness the world’s surreal beauty through Vitale’s lens. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $11-$26. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Revolutionists
Feb. 21-March 3 at UNO Theatre, 6001 Dodge St. Weber Fine Arts. Go inside the mind of a feminist during the French Revolution’s Reign of Terror. This “testament to solidarity” is a girl-powered comedy that explores what could happen if four powerful women got together to oust a tyrant. Times vary. Tickets: $6-$16. 402-554-2406.
unomaha.edu

Seedfoliks at Orpheum Theater

Seedfolks
Feb. 23-March 11 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. This production features a community brought together by the work of one girl as she tries to turn the lot next to her house into a garden. Times vary. Tickets: $20. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Back to the Future
Feb. 24 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Experience the adventure again, or for the first time, as Alan Silvestri’s score is played live as the film is screened in its entirety. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

La Bohème
Feb. 24, 28 at Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Mike Fahey St. The most performed opera in Met history is the story of young Bohemians in 19th-century Paris who are willing to starve—and die—for each other. Times vary. Tickets: $24 general admission, $20 Opera Omaha, Film Streams, or Met Opera members; and $10 students. 402-933-0259.
filmstreams.org

CONCERTS

Black Label Society
Jan. 2 at Sokol Underground, 2234 S. 13th St. In concert with Corrosion of Conformity and Eyehategod, this Los Angeles-based heavy-metal band formed back in 1998 and is on tour leading up to the release of their newest album, Grimmest Hits. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $34 in advance. 402-346-9802.
facebook.com/sokolauditoriumandunderground

The Prince Experience
Jan. 6 at The Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. This performance is a tribute to Prince and will include all of his hits, including the Purple Rain era. 9 p.m. Tickets: $17 in advance, $20 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Schumann’s 3rd Symphony
Jan. 7 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Symphony No. 3, “Rhenish,” recalls a visit to the Rhineland. Listen to the sorrowful yet beautiful paean to lost love. 2 p.m. Tickets: $33. 402-342-3300.
ticketomaha.com

Tennis at the Waiting Room

Tennis
Jan. 10 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. Tennis continues their extensive North American Tour in celebration of their fourth full-length album, Yours Conditionally. 8 p.m. Tickets: $16 in advance, $20 day of show. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Big Head Todd and the Monsters
Jan. 11 at The Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. Big Head Todd has brought their blues-rock sound, with the same core lineup, to the world for 30 years. They are coming to Omaha to promote their 11th studio album. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 advance, $30 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

St. Vincent
Jan. 13 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Musician and songwriter Annie Clark—aka St. Vincent—is one of the most distinctive artistic voices and original guitarists of her generation. Her recent self-titled album, St. Vincent, won her “album of the year” designations from NME, The Guardian, and Entertainment Weekly. 8 p.m. Tickets: $32-$169. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Broken Skulls
Jan. 13 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. This Lincoln-based hard rock/metal group has blended many different genres with influences ranging from blues, death metal, hard rock, and punk. 9 p.m. Tickets: $10. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Bernstein Grooves
Jan. 14 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Join conductor Thomas Wilkins to discover what makes music groove, featuring music by Leonard Bernstein and other composers. 2 p.m. Tickets: $15. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

The Green
Jan. 14 at The Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. This group of musicians from O‘ahu, Hawaii, have become self-titled ambassadors of Aloha, as they spread happiness through their reggae-infused rock. 8 p.m. Tickets: $17 advance, $20 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

John Maus
Jan. 17 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. Maus’ music is a highly mutable affair, often described as retro-futurist on behalf of the ’80s drum machines and synth sounds employed, John’s music is more personal than the nostalgic retread implied. 9 p.m. Tickets: $13 advance, $15 day of show. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

The Texas Tenors
Jan. 20-21 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Audiences are treated to a unique blend of country, classical, Broadway, and pop. With breathtaking vocals and a touch of cowboy charm, the boys create an unforgettable live show. Times vary. Tickets: $19-$89. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Banditos
Jan. 21 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. Banditos’ music appropriates elements of ’60s blues-fused acid rock, boogie, garage punk, and folksy tunes. 9 p.m. Tickets: $10 advanced, $12 day of show. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

UNO Faculty Showcase
Jan. 26 at Strauss Performing Arts Center, 6305 University Drive N. Part of the UNO International Concert Series, this performance is composed of renowned teachers and performers committed to the academic and artistic development of students throughout the United States and globally. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 regular admission, $8 student, military, and seniors. 402-554-3411.
ticketomaha.com

Billy Childs Quartet
Jan. 26 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Emerging as one of the foremost composers of his era, the four-time Grammy winner and his quartet seamlessly blend elements of jazz and classical music. 8 p.m. Tickets: $35. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Curly Martin and Friends at Holland Performing Arts

Curly Martin and Friends
Feb. 2 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. This world-class drummer and Omaha native brings together musician friends and family to celebrate their Nebraska roots and lifelong love of jazz. 8 p.m. Tickets: $20. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Destroyer with Mega Bog
Feb. 3 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. The Canadian rock band Destroyer, fronted by singer-songwriter Dan Bejar, formed in 1995. Destroyer songs are characterized by abstract, poetic lyrics and idiosyncratic vocals. 9 p.m. Tickets: $20. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

The Music of ABBA
Feb. 10 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Direct from Sweden, the world’s foremost ABBA tribute band, Arrival, looks, sounds, and dresses like the supergroup. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$89. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Justin Furstenfeld of Blue October
Feb. 5 at Scottish Rite Hall, 202 S. 20th St. The frontman of the chart-topping band Blue October brings his emotionally charged and magnetic music to Omaha. 8 p.m. Tickets: $32-$45. 402-884-5353.
onepercentproductions.com

ZZ Ward with Black Pistol Fire
Feb. 5 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. Equally evocative of blues grit and hip-hop bounce, this Los Angeles-based vocal powerhouse and multi-instrumentalist’s new sound takes a deeper look at some of the artist’s earliest inspirations—including Howlin’ Wolf, Robert Johnson, and Vera Ward Hall. 9 p.m. Tickets: $25-$99. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Bob Marley Birthday Bash
Feb. 10 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. Rhythm Collective, The Bishops, and DJ Stryker will satiate your thirst for some island reggae and calypso music—the perfect way to celebrate Bob’s B-day. 9 p.m. Tickets: $6-$8. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Nebraska Wind Symphony Winter Concert
Feb. 11 at Omaha Conservatory of Music, 7023 Case St. The Winter Into Spring concert will feature the Nebraska Wind Symphony Middle School All-Star Flutes. 3 p.m. Tickets: $10 adults, $5 students and seniors, ages 12 or younger free. 402-932-4978.
nebraskawindsymphony.com

She-e Wu at the Holland Center

She-e Wu
Feb. 15 at Strauss Performing Arts Center, 6305 University Drive N. Part of the UNO International Concert Series, this performance features the head of Northwestern University’s percussion program playing on a majestic concert marimba. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 adults, $8 students, military, and seniors. 402-554-3411.
ticketomaha.com

Jeremy McComb with Kimberly Dunn and Sack of Lions
Feb. 16 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. McComb is an American country music artist and former tour manager for comedian Larry the Cable Guy. Tickets: $12-$15. 9 p.m. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

“I Met You When I Was 18 World Tour” featuring Lauv with Jeremy Zucker
Feb. 18 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. In his early teens, Ari Staprans Leff (aka Lauv) picked up a guitar and started writing songs of heartbreak before ever having had a romantic relationship. Now 23, the acclaimed L.A.-based singer/songwriter/producer will musically pull your heartstrings. 8 p.m. Tickets: $13-$15. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Haydn’s The Hunt Symphony
Feb. 18 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Adventurous rhythms and harmonies cascade through this piece. Insane energy in the finale captures the intensity of the hunt. Tartini’s concerto suggests the splendors of 18th-century Venice. 2 p.m. Tickets: $33. 402-342-3300.
ticketomaha.com

Pop Evil with Black Map and Palaye Royale
Feb. 20 at The Waiting Room Lounge, 6212 Maple St. The post-grunge/alt-metal band from Michigan, Pop Evil, has a new album out in February. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$25. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Here Come the Mummies
Feb. 22 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. This eight-piece funk-rock band has a one-track mind. Their Terrifying Funk from Beyond the Grave is sure to get you into them (and possibly vice versa). 8 p.m. Tickets: $13-$15. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Chris Potter at Holland Center

Chris Potter
Feb. 23 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. A world-class soloist, composer, and bandleader, this saxophonist has emerged as a leader in his generation in music. 8 p.m. Tickets: $35. 402-345-0202.
ticketomaha.com

Donavon Frankenreiter
Feb. 26 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. This surfer/rocker brings his cool singer-songwriter honesty to the stage. Tickets: $17-$20. 8 p.m. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Family & More

Holiday Lights Festival NRG Ice Rink
Through Feb. 14 at 10th St. and Capitol Ave. A portion of the proceeds will go toward the Shine the Light on Hunger campaign, which supports the Food Bank for the Heartland. Bring the whole family and create memories while supporting the community. Admission: $8 (includes skate rental). 402-650-4813.
holidaylightsfestival.com

The Rooftop Rink
Through Feb. 25 at Midtown Crossing, between 31st-33rd streets and Farnam to Dodge streets. The elevated location is innovative—so is the rink—an all-weather “synthetic ice” surface. Hours of operation to be announced. Admission is a minimum donation of $5 benefiting The Salvation Army. 402-934-9275.
midtowncrossing.com

Joslyn Castle Public Tours
Recurring at the Joslyn Castle, 3902 Davenport St. Tour historic Joslyn Castle each Monday and the first and third Sundays of every month. Admission: $10 adults, $8 seniors (60+), students and military. 402-595-2199.
joslyncastle.com

Millard Branch Escape Room
Jan. 3-5 at Millard Branch Public Library, 13214 Westwood Lane. Once guests are locked in the room, they will go through a series of puzzles in order to get out. There will be an escape room for kids grades 2-4 and 4-6 every hour. Guests should register on the library website. 402-996-8037.
omahalibrary.org

Music & Movement Storytime
Jan. 3 at W. Clarke Swanson Branch, 9101 Dodge St. This event allows active toddlers (up to age 5) to explore literacy through song, dance, and play with their caregivers. 402-444-4852.
omahalibrary.org

Benson First Friday
Jan. 5 and Feb. 2 in Benson (Maple and 59th to 63rd streets). Art galleries, bars, music venues, and cultural institutions of Benson collaborate on the first Friday of every month with a showcase of local arts and culture.
bensonfirstfriday.com

First Friday Old Market
Jan. 5 and Feb. 2 at the Old Market. Walk the distinctive brick streets of the Old Market to live music, ride Ollie the Trolley for free between venues, and ignite your imagination with art at this free event. Recurring the first Friday of each month.
firstfridayoldmarket.com

The Great Train Show
Jan 6-7 at Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs. Immerse yourself in the fascinating world of miniature railroading at the train show, featuring hundreds of tables of trains, accessories, scale models, collectible toys for sale, activities for kids, and seminars. 10 a.m. Tickets: $10-$11, kids are free. 712-323-0536.
caesars.com/mid-america-center

Teen Poetry Workshop
Jan. 13 and Feb. 10 at Omaha Public Library, 13214 Westwood Lane. Join Nebraska Writers Collective’s Louder Than a Bomb coaches and visiting artists to learn from the experts. Recommended ages 8-12 years old. 1:30 p.m. 402-444-4848.
omahalibrary.org

Second Saturday Program at Heron Haven
Jan. 13 at Heron Haven Nature Center, 11809 Old Maple Road. Come hike in the woods and share nature stories while sipping on hot chocolate. Children are encouraged to bring a favorite stuffed animal to help make up a nature story. Admission: free. 10-11:30 a.m. 402-493-4303.
heronhaven.org

Midlands International Auto Show

Midlands International Auto Show
Jan. 18-21 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. See, touch, and experience the automotive industry’s latest and greatest. Tickets: $9 adults:. $7 seniors (65+), children (7-12), and military with ID; free to children under 7. 402-341-1500.
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

River City Hunting, Fishing, Boat, & RV Expo
Jan. 19-21 at Mid-America Center, One Arena Way, Council Bluffs. View more than 100 exhibitors; attend seminars on topics such as ultimate fishing in Canada, mushroom hunting, fly fishing, and dog training; and try out the indoor BB gun and archery ranges, interactive games, and turkey call-in teepee. Times vary. Tickets: $9 adults, $3 kids ages 4-15, and free to ages 3 and under. 712-326-2295.
caesars.com/mid-america-center

The Price is Right Live
Feb. 7 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St. Come on down! This interactive stage show gives eligible individuals the chance to play classic games from television’s longest-running game show. Favorites such as Plinko, Cliffhangers, The Big Wheel, and the Showcase will be at this event. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $49.50-$150. 800-440-3741.
ralstonarena.com

Lawn, Flower, & Patio Show/Omaha Home & Garden Expo
Feb 8-11 at CenturyLink Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St. Gardeners who are ready for the spring planting season will enjoy this event. Over 600 exhibits for the home inside and out. Kids activities include exotic animals to view and games to play. Tickets: $9 adults, $4.50 ages 12-5, free to children 4 and under.
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

FIsh Fries, Fry-days starting Feb. 9

Lenten Fish Fries
Fridays, Feb. 9 through March 30. Feb. 14 this year not only signifies Valentine’s Day, it is also the start of Lent—the season of repentance for many Christians in which they are not allowed to eat meat on Fridays. Numerous Catholic churches in the area will hold fry-days on Fridays in February and March. The three voted for “Best Fish Fry” in “Best of Omaha” 2018 were: Holy Name, Mary Our Queen, and St. Patrick’s of Elkhorn. Visit archomaha.org for more info on Catholic fish fries. Other popular fish fries can be found at All Holy Spirit and St. John the Baptist Greek Orthodox churches, Disabled American Veterans, American Legions, many Protestant churches, and community organizations.

Love at the Zoo.

Love at the Zoo
Feb. 9-10 at Henry Doorly Zoo, 3701 S. 10th St. Listen to a lighthearted presentation about dating and mating in the animal kingdom. The event includes a champagne welcome, dinner, and special animal encounters. Ages 21+ only. 6:30-9 p.m. Tickets: $75. 402-733-8401.
omahazoo.com

KanPai! Con
Feb 9-11 at Hotel RL, 3321 S. 72nd St. Kanpai! Con is an annual cultural appreciation convention that focuses on anime, manga, and Japanese video gaming. Come dressed as a favorite character and enjoy the family-friendly convention setting. Times vary. Admission: $30 weekend pass or $20 one-day pass.
kanpaicon.com

Fasching
Feb. 10 at German-American Society, 3717 S. 120th St. Start celebrating Mardi Gras the Saturday before with Germany’s version of this feast day. Eat jagerschnitzel or herbed fish while listening to music. And don’t forget the bier! 5 p.m. Reservations required by Feb. 6: $19 for members, $22 per guest, $25 for non-members, $9 for children 12 and under. 402-333-6615.
germanamericansociety.org

Second Saturday Program at Heron Haven
Feb. 10 at Heron Haven Nature Center, 11809 Old Maple Road. Watch an educational slide show about the animals at Heron Haven filled with photos from photographer Nanette Williams. This free event is the perfect way to teach children how animals survive in the winter. 402-493-4303.
heronhaven.org

12th Annual Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards
Feb. 18 at Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cuming St. This is Omaha’s own version of the red carpet. Hundreds of musicians, visual artists, and performing artists have been nominated. Find out who won at the event. 6-10 p.m. Tickets: $30.
oea-awards.org

Kids Rule Fashion Show
Feb. 24 and 25 at Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cuming St. This kids fashion show is open to both girls and boys ages 5 to 12. There will be a modeling workshop and a time for garment selection. Register online before the event. 2 p.m. Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: TBA. 402-819-8792.
kidsruleomaha.com

Omaha Fashion Week
Feb. 27-March 4 at Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cuming St. One of the nation’s largest fashion weeks, Omaha Fashion Week holds fall and spring events. Special guest Fern Mallis, founder of New York Fashion Week, will judge during the VIP Runway Finale. Tickets: prices vary.
omahafashionweek.com

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

This article appears in the January/February 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

2017 November/December Performing Arts

Photography by contributed

Stupid F@#%ING Bird, Through Nov. 12 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. This “sort-of adaptation” of The Seagull by Anton Chekhov tells a story in which an aspiring young director battles against the art created by his mother’s generation. A young actress competes with an aging Hollywood star for the affections of a renowned novelist and everyone discovers just how complicated life, art, and success can be. Tickets: $24. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

Point A to Point B, Through Nov. 12 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Point A to Point B is a unique nonverbal show in which two coworkers working in a lab of fun found objects have to get a ball from “point A” to “point B” without using the same path twice. With a bit of theater magic, they fill their work day exploring the excitement of the journey. Show times vary. Best for preschool- to second-grade students. Tickets: $12. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Tosca, Nov. 3 and 5 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Love, lust, religion, and politics fatally collide in Giacomo Puccini’s beloved masterpiece. The lecherous chief of police, Scarpia, will stop at nothing to possess the beautiful singer, Floria Tosca, who must give the ultimate performance in a desperate attempt to save the man she loves. Performed in Italian with English supertitles. Tickets: $19-$99. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Festival of South African Dance at the Holland

Festival of South African Dance, Nov. 5 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St.The festival celebrates expressive dance styles created during the Apartheid era. Two companies featuring more than 20 dancers and musicians share their culture in high-energy performances. 8 p.m. Tickets: $15-$30. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Van Gogh & Me, Nov. 3-12 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. This show is written by Omaha’s own Matthew Gutschick. Based on actual events, the story follows painter Vincent van Gogh (creator of such iconic works as The Starry Night and Sunflowers) as he retreats to a French town and befriends a curious girl named Adeline. Appropriate for ages: 10+. Showtimes vary. Tickets: $20. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

Disney’s The Little Mermaid, Nov. 7-12 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Re-experience the classic Disney animated feature film as a live-action production, featuring favorite characters and songs. The show has been described by The Chicago Tribune as “the most innovative production of the season.” Showtimes vary. Tickets: $35-$110. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Carmina Burana, Nov. 12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Hear “O Fortuna” the music that adds thrills to movie blockbusters as an epic chorus of 500 elite singers from regional high schools join with professional soloists and the Omaha Symphony to perform Carl Orff’s choral masterwork. 2 p.m. Tickets: $19-$72. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Christmas with the Crawfords, Nov. 16-Dec. 10 at SNAP! Productions, 3225 California St. The campy comedy deemed “the Christmas Carol of the 21st century” is back. This nostalgic tribute to one of America’s favorite dysfunctional families highlights beautiful, funny musical numbers. Tickets: $20 adults, and $15 students, seniors (55+), TAG members, or military personnel. 402-341-2757.
snapproductions.com

The 39 Steps, Nov. 24-Dec. 17 at The Bluebarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. The original cast returns in this retro award-winning flashback. Mix a 1930s Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy film noir and a dash of Monty Python for an unforgettable evening of pure pleasure. Packed with nonstop laughs, more than 150 characters, an on-stage plane crash, and romance, The 39 Steps is a riotous blend of virtuoso performances and wildly inventive stagecraft that’s guaranteed to thrill. Times vary. Tickets: $30 adults, $25 students, seniors (65+), or TAG members. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

A Charlie Brown Christmas, Nov. 18 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. A Charlie Brown Christmas comes to life on stage featuring beloved characters and Vince Guaraldi’s famous score. 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets: $20-$56. 402-553-0800.
ticketomaha.com

“A Christmas Carol” at Omaha Community Playhouse

A Christmas Carol, Nov. 17-Dec. 23 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. It just isn’t Christmas without A Christmas Carol. Experience one of Omaha’s favorite holiday traditions as Ebenezer Scrooge takes on a life-changing journey filled with beautiful costumes, exquisite music, perfectly crafted sets, and special effects second to none. Show- times vary. Tickets: $38 and up for adults, $25 and up for students with ID. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

The Exterminating Angel, Nov. 18 and 22 at Filmstreams, 1340 Mike Fahey St. The Exterminating Angel has its Met premiere this season, conducted by the composer, Thomas Adès. Showtimes: 11:55 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets: $24 general admission, $20 members of Opera Omaha, Met Opera, and Film- streams, $10 students with ID. 402-933-0259.
filmstreams.org

Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite, Nov. 19 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Along with this holiday favorite, the performance includes Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 1 and Holloway’s “Europa and the Bull.” Tchaikovsky’s suite from The Nutcracker brings to musical life the Sugar Plum Fairy and “The Waltz of the Flowers.” 2 p.m. Tickets: $33 general admission, $27 Joslyn members. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

PJ Masks Live, Nov. 20 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St. Time to Be a Hero is a brand new live show, featuring the heroic trio from the cartoon series PJ Masks. Watch Catboy, Owlette, and Gekko as they try to save the day from their sneaky foes—Romeo, Night Ninja, and Luna Girl. 6-8 p.m. Tickets: $25-$45. 402-934-9966.
ralstonarena.com

Yesterday and Today, Nov. 24-Dec. 31 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Billy McGuigan and his brothers are back for the 10th consecutive year. This all-request Beatles tribute show will have you dancing in the aisles and singing along to every song. Showtimes vary. Tickets: $40. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

MJ Live, Nov. 25 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This Michael Jackson tribute concert returns to Omaha. The concert features all of Jackson’s biggest hits, including “Bad,” “Billie Jean,” and “Beat It,” performed by the MJ LIVE band and dancers. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $35-$150. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Nov. 25-26 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Experience the first of the eight films as The Harry Potter Film Concert Series launches in Omaha. John Williams’ score is performed live as the entire motion picture is projected on the big screen. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Shopkins Live! Shop it up!, Nov. 27 at the Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. All of Shopville is in abuzz as preparations get underway for the annual “Funtastic Food and Fashion Fair.” But no event is complete without a few hiccups. The Shopkins and Shoppies need your help—the show must go on. 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$100. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Cirque Musica Holiday Presents Believe, Nov. 30 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. Cirque Musica combines music, acrobatics, and beloved holiday music. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $35-$95. 402-341-1500
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

The Nutcracker, Dec. 2-3 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This family favorite features a uniquely breathtaking “Waltz of the Flowers” scene and includes a cast of 130 professional and student dancers, lavish sets, and more than 250 beautiful costumes. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $27-$87. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Joyful Noise, Dec. 3 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Omaha’s Grammy-nominated Salem Baptist Church features the soaring voices of more than 70 members. The concert includes special guest artists, theatrical performances, and choreography. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets: $15. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Hip Hop Nutcracker at Orpheum Theater

The Hip Hop Nutcracker, Dec. 9 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. The Hip Hop Nutcrackerreimagines the classic through explosive hip hop choreography. A dozen dancers, a DJ, and an electric violinist bring the traditional story to life in modern-day New York City. A holiday mash-up for the entire family, this performance is a contemporary reimagination of Tchaikovsky’s timeless music. 8 p.m. Tickets: $20-60. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Holiday at Hogwarts, Dec. 9, 14-16, and 21-23 at The Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. During this festive and immersive foray into the wizarding world attendees will be sorted into houses and then join professors Flitwick, Snape, Sprout, and McGonagall for a few final lessons. After class there will be a grand celebratory feast. 7 p.m. Tickets: $35 (includes dinner). 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

Symphony Christmas Celebration 2017, Dec. 9-17 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Ernest Richardson and the Omaha Symphony celebrate the magic of Christmas with Broadway singers and tap-dancing Santas performing Christmas classics and contemporary favorites. Times vary. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

 

Waitress, Dec. 12-17 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Waitress tells the story of Jenna, an expert pie maker, who uses her skills to try to start a new life far away from her loveless marriage and the small town where she grew up. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $35-$100. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

John Waters Christmas Show, Dec. 16 at the Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. Legendary filmmaker and raconteur John Waters (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray, A Dirty Shame) puts the X in Xmas with rapid-fire monologue, sharing his compulsive desire to give and receive perverted gifts, a religious fanaticism for Santa Claus, and an unhealthy love of true crime holiday horror stories. 8 p.m. Admission: $35 in advance, $40 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

This calendar was printed in the November/December edition of Omaha Magazine. 

2017 November/December Concerts

Photography by Contributed

Real Estate, Nov. 1 at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th St. Real Estate’s fourth album, In Mind, retains much of their mellifluous, yet melodic, indie-rock sound. Fans will note that founding guitarist Matt Mondanile has left, and the band has undergone some big lineup changes. 8 p.m. $20 in advance, $23 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

The Wrecks, Nov. 1 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. Heavily influenced by Weezer, The Pixies, The Strokes, and Vampire Weekend, this five-piece ensemble from Los Angeles is known for catchy choruses with bitingly honest lyrics. 8 p.m. Tickets: $13 in advance, $15 day of show. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Breaking Benjamin Unplugged, Nov. 2 at Sokol Auditorium, 2234 S. 13th St. Founded in Pennsylvania in 1999, this hard-rock band has since released five studio albums and are currently touring the United States. Tickets: sold-out. 8 p.m. 402-346-9802.
facebook.com/sokolauditoriumandunderground

The Urge at The Waiting Room

The Urge w/ Clever and Mandown, Nov. 4 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. Formed in 1987, The Urge spans multiple genres and generations with their hard-rock and metal music. Tickets: $25. 8 p.m. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

The Drums, Nov. 7 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. Indie-pop darling The Drums is on tour again to celebrate a fourth album, Abysmal Thoughts. This one-man band consisting of Johnny Pierce delivers a catchy sad- surfer sound. 8 p.m. $15. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Cold Specks, Nov. 10 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. Toronto-based singer-songwriter Cold Specks (Ladan Hussein) is on tour for the release of her latest album, Fool’s Paradise. Her music has been described as doom-soul. 9 p.m. $10. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Hollywood Undead w/ Butcher Babies and Demrick, Nov. 10 at Sokol Auditorium, 2234 S. 13th St. On tour promoting their newest album, FIVE, this rap-rock band will be in Omaha one night only. Tickets: $35 advance, $40 day of show. 7 p.m. 402-346-9802.
facebook.com/sokolauditoriumandunderground

New Found Glory w/ the Ataris, Nov. 15 at Sokol Auditorium, 2234 S. 13th St. On tour celebrating “20 Years of Pop-Punk,” the band founded in 1997 is promoting their newest album, Makes Me Sick. Tickets: $24 advance, $27 day of show. 7:30 p.m. 402-346-9802.
facebook.com/sokolauditoriumandunderground

Jack Broadbent, Nov. 16 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. The English singer-songwriter was deemed “the new master of the slide guitar” by the Montreux Jazz Festival. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Chris Stapleton at CenturyLink Center.

Chris Stapleton, Nov. 18 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. This Grammy-winning artist brings his “All American Road Show” to Omaha to celebrate the release of his latest album From A Room: Volume 1. 7 p.m. Tickets: $35.75-$70.75. 402-341-1500.
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

The Deslondes, Nov. 20 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. The Deslondes are coming to Omaha to promote their new album, Hurry Home. The band’s sophomore release departs from the country-folk sound of their first release into one of psychedelic soul, with a stronger emphasis on organ and electric guitar. 8 p.m. Tickets: $15. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Grieves, Nov. 20 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. Better know by his stage name, Grieves just released his latest album, Running Wild. Tickets: $14 in advance, $16 day of show. 8 p.m. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

The English Beat, Nov. 24 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. Founded back in 1979 in Birmingham, England, The English Beat continues with vocalist/guitarist Dave Wakeling keeping the beat going after almost 30 years. Tickets: $25. 9 p.m. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Katy Perry, Nov. 28 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. One of the biggest stars of the twenty-tweens comes to Omaha on tour to celebrate her fifth studio album, Witness. 7 p.m. Tickets: $30.50-$135.50. 402-341-1500.
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

Mogwai, Nov. 30 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. This Scottish post-rock band will be in Omaha one night only. 8 p.m. Tickets: $23 in advance, $26 day of show. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Whitney, Dec. 1 at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple St. Indie-rock newbies Whitney are making waves with their debut album Light Upon The Lake. The band’s songs vary from somber love songs to get-up-and- dance jams. 9 p.m. Tickets: $15. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Lindsey Stirling, Dec. 4 at Orpheum Theater, 409. S. 16th St. Lindsey Stirling dreams big. Since the release of her 2012 self-titled debut, the electronic music impresario (also a classically trained violinist, dancer, and artist) has become one of the 21st century’s most innovative stars by clinging to her groundbreaking vision of cinematic, violin-driven, electronic music. 8 p.m. Tickets: $39.50-$269. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Straight No Chaser at Orpheum Theater

Straight No Chaser, Dec. 6 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Straight No Chaser is the captivating sound of nine voices coming together to make extraordinary music. Formed while attending Indiana University, the group has emerged as a phenomenon with a massive fan base and numerous TV appearances. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $29-$74. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Aqueous, Dec. 6 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. This groove-rock band has built a name for themselves touring and performing high-profile sets at major festivals. Aqueous mixes original songs like “Kitty Chaser” with covers of songs like Pearl Jam’s “Jeremy.” 9 p.m. Tickets: $10 in advance. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Mannheim Steamroller Christmas, Dec. 22-23 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Mannheim Steamroller Christmas has been America’s favorite holiday tradition for the past 30 years. Grammy-award-winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the beloved Christmas music along with dazzling multimedia effects performed in an intimate setting. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $38.25-$78.25. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

String Theory: NYE 2018, Dec. 31 at Reverb Lounge, 6121 Military Ave. String Theory will be on hand to ring in the new year with performances from other local bands (TBA). 9 p.m. $7 in advance, $10 day of show. 402-884-5707.
reverblounge.com

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

This calendar was printed in the November/December 2017 edition of Omaha Magazine. 

2017 November/December Explore!

Photography by contributed

State of Nebraska

Nebraska: Thomas Hart Benton—MONA Collection. Through Feb. 25, Museum of Nebraska Art, 2401 Central Ave., Kearney. Celebrate Nebraska’s 150th statehood anniversary with this MONA exhibit, which will show the only 28-piece set of Benton’s gouache paintings, including the pieces featured in the 1945 book The Oregon Trail. 308-865-8559.
mona.unk.edu

Hayrack Rides, Storytelling and S’mores in Nebraska City Nov. 3-4 and 10-11

Hayrack Rides, Storytelling and S’mores. Nov. 3-4 and 10-11, Lied Lodge and Conference Center, 2700 Sylvan Road, Nebraska City. Guests will spend the evening sipping apple cider, listening to stories, making s’mores, and taking hayrack rides at Arbor Day farm. Reservations required. 800-546-5433.
liedlodge.org

Fort Atkinson Candlelight Tour 2017. Nov. 4, Fort Atkinson State Historical Park, 201 S. Seventh St., Fort Calhoun. Take a guided tour of the fort by candlelight. The evening also includes a mystery, based on actual events. Each stop along the way will reveal another part of the plot. Reservations required. 402-445-0706.
fortatkinsononline.org

27th Annual Frost Frolic Holiday Market. Nov. 4, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 56885 PWF Road, Fairbury. Kick off the holiday season early at this 27th annual event. Explore a variety of décor from artisan crafts and goods from popular vendors. 402-300-7146.
frostfrolic.bonhamtheatre.org

A Brownville Christmas Concert. Nov. 8-10, Brownville Concert Series and Hall, 126 Atlantic St., Brownville.  Experience a Brownville Christmas at the Home for the Holidays concert. Performances will feature award-winning musicians and vocalists. 402-825-3331.
brownvilleconcertseries.com

Veterans Day. Nov. 11, Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum, 28210 W. Park Highway, Ashland. Honor military veterans at a special program, including the posting of colors and lunch with keynote speaker Major Cory Kuehn, the assistant director of operations in the 740th Missile Squadron at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota. Veterans are encouraged to come in uniform. 402-944-3100.
sacmuseum.org

Gateway Farm Expo. Nov. 15-16, Buffalo County Fairgrounds, 3807 Ave. North, Kearney. Guests will see the latest agriculture technology and services at this 49th annual expo, which will feature more than 400 exhibits and free barbecue. 308-234-2717.
gatewayfarmexpo.org

North Pole Express in Lincoln Dec. 1-3, 8-10, and 15-17

North Pole Express. Nov. 18 and 25, Stuhr Museum, 3133 W. U.S. Highway 34, Grand Island. Children will enjoy taking a trip to the North Pole through songs, stories, and much more, while on a real train car. Reservations required. 308-385-5316.
stuhrmuseum.org

Christmas at the Mansion. Nov. 18-Dec. 23, Lied Lodge and Conference Center, 2700 Sylvan Road, Nebraska City. Go back in time and tour the historic 52-room mansion with vintage-inspired decorations and holiday-themed displays. 800-546-5433.
liedlodge.org

Christmas at Cody Park. Nov. 26-Dec. 30 at Cody Park, 1601 N. Jeffers St., North Platte. Come to Santa’s workshop, drop off a letter for the big guy, and enjoy free carousel and glider rides during this special time at the park. Special events, such as music, movies, or parades, occur throughout the month. 308-535-6700.
ci.north-platte.ne.us

Fantasy of Trees. Nov. 24, 2017-Jan. 2, 2018, Stuhr Museum, 3133 W. U.S. Highway 34, Grand Island. View dozens of lavishly decorated trees on display at the various historic buildings at this museum that celebrates Nebraska. 308-385-5316.
stuhrmuseum.org

Holiday Trolley Tour of Lights. Fridays and Saturdays in December, Lied Lodge and Conference Center, 2700 Sylvan Road, Nebraska City. Guests will ride the Arbor Day Farm trolley to tour Nebraska City’s Christmas lights display and listen to classic Christmas stories. 800-546-5433.
liedlodge.org

North Pole Express. Dec. 1-3, 8-10, and 15-17, Lincoln Children’s Zoo, 1222 S. 27th St., Lincoln. Climb aboard the North Pole Express to write a letter to Santa, and visit the man himself. The train will also stop at the Claus’ house to see Mrs. Claus and the elves, and taste some cookies. 402-475-6741.
lincolnzoo.org

Santa goes to Space. Dec. 2, Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum, 28210 W. Park Highway, Ashland. Santa and Star Wars characters are teaming up for Space Day. Take photos with the man in red and Stormtroopers from the 501st Legion, and enjoy planetarium showings and holiday activities. 402-944-3100.
sacmuseum.org

23rd Annual Historical Christmas Dinner and Light Up the Fort. Dec. 2 Fort Robinson State Park, Crawford. Guests can see the historical fort buildings decorated in Christmas lights and enjoy a historical Christmas dinner. 308-665-2592.
highplainshomestead.com

Tommy Emmanuel Christmas Classics Tour. Dec. 5, Rococo Theatre, 140 N. 13th St., Lincoln. Tommy Emmanuel will preform Christmas classics with Pat Bergeson, John Knowles, Annie Sellick, and a live orchestra. 402-476-6540.
rococotheatre.com

Jay-Z: 4:44 Tour. Dec. 6, Pinnacle Bank Arena, 400 Pinnacle Arena Drive, Lincoln
Grammy-award winning hip-hop artist Jay-Z performs hits from his 4:44 album in Lincoln. 402-904-4444.
pinnaclebankarena.com

Iowa

The Color Purple in Des Moines through Nov. 5

The Color Purple. Through Nov. 5, Des Moines Civic Center, 221 Walnut St., Des Moines. Experience a re-enactment of Tony Award-winning musical The Color Purple, featuring jazz, ragtime, gospel, and blues music. This play explores a woman’s journey living in the South. 515-246-2300.
desmoinesperformingarts.org

Des Moines Holiday Boutique. Nov 3-5, Iowa Events Center, 730 Third St., Des Moines. Don’t miss the shopping event of the season. The holiday boutique will feature over 200 companies and vendors selling apparel, jewelry, holiday décor, and gourmet food. 515-564-8000.
iowaeventscenter.com

Sioux City Symphony Orchestra: Disney Fantasia Live in Concert. Nov. 18, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St., Sioux City. This show is a mash-up of the original Disney Fantasia and Fantasia 2000 performed with a live score.  712-244-5000.
orpheumlive.com

Elf the Musical. Nov. 19, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St., Sioux City. This show will feature the 2003 film’s storyline with new and exciting songs. 712-244-5000.
orpheumlive.com

Sioux City Orchestra: Christmas with the Symphony. Dec. 9, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St., Sioux City. Sit back, listen, and sing along to new and classic Christmas songs preformed by the Sioux City Orchestra. 712-244-5000. 
orpheumlive.com

Missouri

Through the Eyes of Picasso. Through April 8, 2018, Nelson-Aktins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak St., Kansas City. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is the only United States arts venue to show this exhibit. Pablo Picasso was an avid collector of non-western art, and the collection was constant source of exploration and inspiration. The exhibition will feature 170 works, including more than 60 paintings, sculptures, and ceramics by Picasso alongside more than 20 works of African and Oceanic art that were part of his personal collection. 816-751-1278.
nelson-atkins.org

Mayor’s Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in Kansas City, Missouri Nov. 24

Mayor’s Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony. Nov. 24, Crown Center, 2405 Grand Blvd., Suite 200, Kansas City. Guests will witness the mayor light his 100-foot tall Christmas tree, and be able purchase hand-crafted ornaments carved out of last year’s tree. All ornament purchases will benefit the Mayor’s Christmas Tree Fund, which helps the city’s less fortunate. 816-274-8444.
crowncenter.com

Lady Gaga: World Tour. Nov. 15, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand Blvd., Kansas City. Energetic artist Lady Gaga will be performing songs from her new World Tour album. 816-949-7100.
sprintcenter.com

Christmas in the Sky. Nov. 22, 11101 Raytown Road, Kansas City. Jackson County Parks and Recreation is partnering with a radio station to light the sky with fireworks timed by Christmas songs. This 30th annual event will feature a cast of 100 singers and dancers. 816-503-4800.
makeyourdayhere.com

Christmas Candlelight Tour: A Prairie Christmas. Nov. 24-25, 4000 Baltimore, Kansas City. Visit Kansas City’s oldest residence and enjoy an old-fashioned 1860s Christmas celebration with the Westport Historical Society. Tour the home of Col. John and Henrietta Harris, and watch realistic 1860 scenarios. 816-561-1821.
westporthistorical.com

Holiday Park. Nov. 24-Jan.1 Krug Park to Hyde Park, St. Joseph. One of the largest annual holiday lights displays in northwest Missouri, this event started in 1981, and today more than 100,000 visitors drive through each year to see the lavish display of lighted arches and trees, winter scenes, and the park’s Italianate buildings outlined in lights. At the southern end of the parkway, Hyde Park is dazzlingly lit for the holiday season. 816-271-5500
stjomo.com

Candlelight Homes Tour. Dec. 1-3, throughout Weston. Tour historic homes in this antebellum city as the downtown street lamps are aglow with greenery and lights. The streets leading to the tour homes will be lined with luminaries. Father Christmas will be there, of course. 816-640-2909.
westonmo.com

Christmas with Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith. Dec. 8, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand Blvd., Kansas City. Enjoy classic and new Christmas songs preformed by Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith. 816-949-7100.
sprintcenter.com

2017 NCAA Women’s Volleyball Championship in Kansas City, Missouri Dec. 14-16

2017 NCAA Women’s Volleyball Championship. Dec. 14-16, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand Blvd., Kansas City. Join the best in collegiate women’s volleyball as they compete for the title of 2017 champion. 816-949-7100.
sprintcenter.com

Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

2017 September/October Music

September 1, 2017 by
Photography by contributed

Benson First Friday Femme Fest, Sept. 1 and 2 in Benson. Up to 80 female-fronted bands will take over the Benson strip during this two-night event. The headliner Friday night is Freakabout; the Saturday night headliner is Pleiades and the Bear. Tickets: $10 per night. 402-953-8849.
bensonfirstfriday.com

Lynyrd Skynyrd at Stir Concert Cove Sept. 3

Lynyrd Skynyrd, Sept. 3 at Stir Cove, 1 Harrah’s Blvd., Council Bluffs. These iconic Southern rockers will play fan favorites from “Sweet Home Alabama” to “Saturday Night Special,” but the band also announced they will play some of their forgotten jams from the past four decades. 8 p.m. Tickets: $54-$295. 712-329-6000.
ticketmaster.com

Spoon, Sept. 11 at Sokol Auditorium, 2234 S. 13th St. Longtime indie rockers Spoon embark on a world tour for the release of their ninth album, Hot Thoughts, lauded by New York Magazine as “another knockout.” 8:30 p.m. Tickets: $29.50 in advance, $35 day of show. 402-346-9802.
ticketmaster.com

Ed Sheeran, Sept. 12 at the CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter comes to Omaha to promote his latest album, Divide. The setlist may include such favorites as “Photograph,” “Thinking Out Loud,” and “Castle on the Hill.” 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $87-$280. 402-341-1500.
centurylinkcenteromaha.org

Get the Led Out, Sept. 15 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St., Ralston. Get the Led Out is a Philadelphia-based group deemed “The American Led Zeppelin.” The group is dedicated to recreating the music of Led Zeppelin. Fans can expect favorites and some Zeppelin songs rarely played live. 8 p.m. Tickets: $25-$35. 402-934-6291.
ralstonarena.com

Thundercat, Sept. 16 at The Slowdown, 728 N. 14th St. Bassist Stephen Bruner is making waves with his third studio album, Drunk. The star-studded album features Kenny Loggins, Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa, and Pharrell Williams. 9 p.m. Tickets: $18 in advance, $20 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

FARNAM FEST, Sept. 16 at The Blackstone District, 40th Street between Farnam and Dodge. This year’s musical lineup features Tennis, Shannon and the Clams, and White Mystery. Essentially a block party, the events’ purpose is to celebrate the Blackstone District, it’s business’s, and all of the people that make this unique neighborhood what it is. Festival also features local craft breweries and food vendors. Gates open at 3:30 p.m. Music starts at 4 p.m.
farnamfestival.com

New Generation Music Festival, Sept. 16 at Stinson Park in Aksarben Village, 2285 S. 67th St. This music festival, which began last year, features legendary rappers Rakim and Talib Kweli, along with lots of local musicians and artists. 1-11 p.m. 402-496-1616.
newgenerationmusicfestival.com

NEEDTOBREATHE with Gavin DeGraw, Sept. 21 at Stir Cove, 1 Harrah’s Blvd., Council Bluffs. Christian rockers NEEDTOBREATHE  and special guest Gavin DeGraw bring their “All the Feels” tour to Omaha. The performance will include songs from their latest album, Hard Love, and other fan favorites. 7 p.m. Tickets: $34-$113. 712-329-6000.
ticketmaster.com

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, Sept. 22 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N. 10th St. Country music’s famous couple is touring together for the first time since 2006. Expect to hear fan favorites, radio hits, and some new songs from their debut album as a couple. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $87.50-$117.50. 402-341-1500.
ticketmaster.com

J Balvin, Sept. 24 at Ralston Arena, 7300 Q St. This Colombian artist is one of the top Latin pop stars of today. His most recent album, Energia, was listed on Rolling Stone’s “10 Best Latin Albums of 2016.” His musical style is described as “reggaeton”—a combination of hip-hop, Latin American, and Caribbean music. 7 p.m. Tickets: $49-$99. 402-934-6291.
ralstonarena.com

Herb Alpert and Lani Hall at Holland Performing Arts Center Sept. 28

Herb Alpert and Lani Hall, Sept. 28 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Iconic trumpeter, composer, and record label executive Herb Alpert joins forces with his partner in music and life, Lani Hall, to bring 50 years of hits like “Tijuana Taxi” and “A Taste of Honey” to Omaha. Tickets: $29-$85. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Fleet Foxes, Sept. 29 at The Waiting Room Outdoors, Military Avenue and Maple Street. The Waiting Room will move outdoors for Fleet Foxes’ first performance in Omaha. After a six-year hiatus, the indie-folk band is back with the release of their new album Crack-Up. 7 p.m. Tickets: $36. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Future Islands with Explosions in the Sky, Sept. 30 at The Waiting Room Outdoors, Military Avenue and Maple Street. The Baltimore-based band is on tour to promote their latest album, The Far Field. Future Islands entertains audiences with an energetic, furious, and bare-boned performance from frontman Samuel T. Herring. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $35. 402-884-5353.
waitingroomlounge.com

Omaha Symphony: Oh, What a Night! with the Doo Wop Project, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at Holland Performing Art Center, 1200 Douglas St. The stars of Jersey Boys and Motown: The Musical electrify audiences with their tight harmonies and dance moves singing hits from the Temptations and Four Seasons through Michael Jackson and beyond. 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0606.
omahasymphony.org

The Avett Brothers, Oct. 5 at Stir Cove, 1 Harrah’s Blvd., Council Bluffs. This will be The Avett Brothers’ fourth performance at Stir Cove. The Grammy-nominated ensemble will bring their alternative folk sound that merges musical genres from bluegrass to EDM. 8 p.m. Tickets: $40-$153. 712-329-6000.
ticketmaster.com

Wynonna and Big Noise Dubbed at Holland Performing Arts Center Oct. 12

Wynonna and Big Noise Dubbed, Oct. 12 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Dubbed “the greatest female country singer since Patsy Cline” by Rolling Stone, Wynonna Judd, with her band The Big Noise, delivers a show that’s part nostalgia, part comedy, and all rich, soulful music. 7:30 pm. Tickets: $35 and up. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Symphony Spooktacular: Superheroes, Oct. 22 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Dress up as a superhero and enjoy an afternoon of music, spooky fun, trick-or-treating, and other surprises. 2 p.m. Tickets: $15. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Deer Tick, Oct. 25 at The Slowdown, 728 N. 14th St. Deer Tick will release two albums Sept. 15. The albums, titled Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol. 2, will showcase the band’s diverging sounds. From gritty garage-punk to folky jams, their live show is sure to be an unexpected culmination of the two genres. 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 in advance, $23 day of show. 402-345-7569.
theslowdown.com

Thomas Rhett at CenturyLinkCenter Oct. 28

Thomas Rhett, Oct. 28 at CenturyLink Center, 455 N 10th St. Thomas Rhett comes to Omaha for his “Home Team Tour” with World Dominion and Walker Hayes. Rhett will perform new songs along with fan favorites. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$54-$75. 402-341-1500.
centurylinkcenteromaha.com

The British Invasion with Billy McGuigan, Oct. 28 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Relive the mania in an all-new show when Billy McGuigan and his band perform the music of the Beatles, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, the Who, and more. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$79. 402-345-0606.
omahasymphony.org

**Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

2017 September/October Performances

Photography by contributed

Babe the Sheep Pig, Sept. 8-24 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Babe the piglet is brought to Hogget Farm, where, with some help from a dog named Fly, he discovers he has a unique talent for herding sheep. 7 p.m. Fridays; 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays; and 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $10 for members, $20 for nonmembers. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

How Very Unfairy: Into the Wicked Woods, Sept. 14-23 at Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. This dinner and show presents fairy tales in their true forms. Created to scare children into good behavior, these pre-Disney fairy tales are full of gore and terror. Tickets: $29. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays. 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

Big Canvas Improv, Sept. 16 at Apollon, 1801 Vinton St. An entirely improv show from family-friendly comedy troupe Big Canvas. This unique show is created from a series of improv games and scenes. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Tickets: $5. 402-884-0135.
apollonomaha.com

Every Brilliant Thing, Sept. 21-Oct. 15 at Bluebarn Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St. This solo show, performed by Bluebarn founder Hughston Walkinshaw, tells the tale of a 7 year old who attempts to cheer up his mom, who’s in the hospital, by making a list of every brilliant thing about the world. Tickets: $30 general admission; $25 students, seniors (65+), TAG members, and people in groups of 10 or more. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 6 p.m. Sundays. 402-345-1576.
bluebarn.org

Mamma Mia, Sept. 15-Oct. 15 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. Packed with favorite ABBA songs such as “Dancing Queen” and “Take a Chance On Me,” it is no surprise that this musical is one of the top 10 longest-running Broadway musicals. 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $42 adults, $22 students with valid ID. $10 discount for TAG members. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

G2K Cinderella, Sept. 22-Oct. 1 at Chanticleer Theater, 830 Franklin Ave., Council Bluffs. In this specially created G2K (Getting To Know) version, all the beloved songs and familiar characters are present. The script has been condensed to better suit young attention spans, and the plot has been slightly altered to highlight some important lessons. 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $20 adults, $16 seniors, $10 students. 712-323-9955.
chanticleertheater.com

Madagascar, Oct. 6-22 at The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. Watch Alex the lion, Marty the zebra, Gloria the hippo, Melvin the giraffe, and King Julien the lemur make their way from the Central Park Zoo to the mysterious land of Madagascar. 7 p.m. Fridays; 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays; and 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $10 members, $20 nonmembers. 402-345-4849.
rosetheater.org

“Underwater Bubble Show” at Orpheum Theater Oct. 7

The Underwater Bubble Show, Oct. 7 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. This story follows the adventures of downtrodden businessman Mr. B as he is miraculously transported to a place called Bubblelandia. This show blends drama, mime, dance, puppetry, juggling, contortion, visual effects, and more. 3 p.m. Tickets: $15 and up. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Finding Neverland, Oct. 11-15 at Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. Learn the story behind one of the world’s most beloved tales: Peter Pan. This musical follows J.M. Barrie’s real life experience and inspiration behind the magical world of Neverland. 7: 30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $35 and up. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

Stupid F@#%ing Bird, Oct. 13-Nov. 12 at Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St. A wacky and brazen adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull, written by Aaron Posner, who presents a story of art, love, and success. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $42 adults, $22 students with valid ID. $10 discount for TAG members. 402-553-0800.
omahaplayhouse.com

Momentum: Fosse Style, Oct. 20 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Broadway legend Ann Reinking is coming to Omaha to stage a Bob Fosse medley. Fosse’s iconic choreography set new standards for theatrical dance, and Reinking is a principal authority on his style and work. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $22-$53. 402-345-0606.
balletnebraska.org

“Shatner’s World” at Holland Performing Arts Center Oct. 26

Shatner’s World: We Just Live In It, Oct. 26 at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Walk down memory lane with William Shatner in this two-hour show where he poignantly reflects on life’s trials, romance, and some of his wildest memories from a lifetime in show business. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $35 and up. 402-345-0606.
ticketomaha.com

**Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.