Tag Archives: Omaha Chamber of Commerce

Mike Bojanski

January 22, 2019 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

People don’t like feedback; they like attention,” says Mike Bojanski, vice president of Finley Engineering in Omaha. “Attention comes out like this: ‘What are you working on today? Is there anything getting in your way? And how can I help you?’”

It’s a philosophy Bojanski has held throughout his 35-year career in human resources, in which he has communicated with thousands of employees and provided all kinds of motivations for their work lives.

People have been a continual source of challenge and fascination for Bojanski, who was also the 2018 president of the Human Resource Association of the Midlands (HRAM).

The HR life, he says, requires the skills of a behaviorist and the passion to learn what makes people tick.

“It’s cliché, but most people I like, and some I don’t want to be around,” Bojanski says. “I’m interested in both.”

HR professionals make a big mistake when they bind themselves to their offices, becoming the coworkers others dread who only appear when it is time to hand out disciplinary action, firings, and layoffs.

To understand workers and benefit their employers, HR professionals must adapt the philosophy of “management by walking around.”

“You do human resources work by talking to people. Going into their space,” Bojanski says. “If you understand what they understand, then you understand the challenges that management has, that employees have, and you can respond to their issues more quickly.”

He subscribes to “service leadership” as his management style—asking more questions and listening more, not asking others to do tasks you wouldn’t, and removing obstacles so people can more effectively perform their jobs. It is this service leadership that has helped him throughout his career, especially during this past year with HRAM.

Building Omaha’s HR Community

As a young professional in 1985, Bojanski joined HRAM, the local chapter of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). The Omaha-based regional chapter boasts more than 1,000 members, making it one of the 15 largest SHRM chapters in the United States.

Sarah Schulz, executive director of HRAM, says Bojanski was great to work with this year. Bojanski’s commitment to serving others was evident, having personally reached out to each member who joined HRAM during his presidential term.

“Mike is passionate about organizations he lends his time to,” she says. “He honestly puts his heart into the projects he leads. He strives to make HRAM a better organization by making sure that the association is serving and advancing the greater Omaha HR community through professional development and networking opportunities.”

The organization acquired 177 new members this year. Bojanski believes new membership is key to building programs that help members, such as booking quality speakers who present topics that lead to certification credits. HRAM has also worked with the Wellness Council of the Midlands, the Omaha Chamber of Commerce, and the Omaha chapter of the National Safety Council on a series of events common to both human resources and safety industry professionals.

He was head of the membership committee for several years prior to becoming vice president, and also served as head of the college relations committee.

“During his vice presidential term [HRAM presidents are vice-presidents for three years], we had a group of kids form a chapter at Creighton, and he’s been helping them,” Schulz says. “He goes and speaks to UNO frequently. He has gone and talked about recruiting, about benefits.”

Schulz says Bojanski is particularly great at helping young HR professionals learn the “human” portion of human relations that they could not have learned in college.

And Bojanski continues to learn about this “human” portion himself. He says he is among those members who benefit by building “a network of people who are smarter.”

“That’s how I’ve used it. When I have an HR situation, I can say, ‘Hey, has this ever happened to you?’” he says.

Another highlight was having Nebraska named as a 2018 member of the 100% Giving Club of the SHRM Foundation, which annually recognizes the states that give to the foundation from their SHRM state council and all chapters within the state. HRAM gave around $2,000 this year. One dollar was given for each member, and the remaining $1,000 was donated little by little, through such items as the table flowers being raffled off at the annual meeting.

Just as little things like calling members personally and asking employees how they are have added up to one big career for Bojanski.


Visit hram.org for more information.

This article was printed in the February/March 2019 edition of B2B. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Mike Bojanski

Weird Is Good

July 14, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Since transplanting from Pennsylvania nearly a decade ago, Christopher Vaughn Couse has made the observation that Omaha is downright weird—but in a good way.

From the hipster-laden streets of Benson to the apex of West Omaha’s suburbs, where cul-de-sacs meet cornfields—and of course there’s our friendly local billionaire, Mr. Buffett, who you may just spot snacking on a Dilly Bar—Couse is right: There’s no place like Homaha. As an artist, to pay homage to all the things that make Omaha, well, Omaha, Couse painted a simple black-and-white design with text that reads “Keep Omaha Good Weird.” It was part of Benson First Friday’s Tiny Mural Project.

“It’s about celebrating the city’s diversity and everyone’s willingness to embrace others for doing their own thing,” Couse says. Of course, it’s also a mix of the almost-revoked Nebraska mantra, “The Good Life,” and the “Keep Austin/Portland Weird” slogans.

If you’ve walked the streets of Benson or Dundee, stopped in at one of the latest oh-so-trendy and oh-so-healthy Eat Fit Go restaurants, or are familiar with the Omaha Chamber of Commerce’s “We Don’t Coast” campaign, you’ve likely seen Couse’s work. He may not be a Nebraska native, but with roots firmly planted in this city, his work as a freelancer, photographer, and illustrator seems to be sprouting up everywhere.

And that’s pretty darn good for a self-described “art school dropout.” It took just two years of classes in the art photography program at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania for Couse to discover he needed to try a different path —and eventually a different city—to forge his career. Determined to utilize his keen eye and knack for creative styling as a professional artist, he knew it was time to move on from the world of lectures and syllabi when a professor told him art photography was a dead-end job.

“Just like that, tuition money became payments for nicer photography equipment,” Couse says.

Just because Couse was done with school didn’t mean he was done with education. He took his lack of professional training as a chance to personally develop his craft and began learning new mediums.

While he had been taking photographs since his teen years, the next evolution of his artistry came when he began combining his shots with handwritten notes to make collages. Then came illustrating and painting, then printmaking, and even working on zines. One glance at his Instagram, @christography, and you could argue he’s made social media his next canvas.

“I delve into different genres of art, figure out what I like, and begin incorporating these aesthetics into my own work,” Couse says. “I’ll admit, I have a bad problem of not sticking with one thing and instead trying to tackle a lot of things.”

But that doesn’t mean there aren’t any similarities across mediums. Stylistically, his work is usually filled with color, idiosyncratic humor, and his emotions as each piece reflects what he was feeling when it was created. Thematically, he regularly combines text with imagery, and he’s often inspired by the conversations, people, and the city surrounding him.

For one of his most popular series, a combination of party gossip and local lore inspired him. Shortly after moving, he heard boozed-up friends describing metro movers and shakers as “Omaha Famous.” Using his love for pop culture, he decided to borrow this phrase and started illustrating portraits of actual famous people who were born in Omaha. Perhaps nowhere else will you find a collection that includes the likes of activist Malcolm X, President Gerald R. Ford, and Lady Gaga’s ex and “cool Nebraska guy” Lüc Carl. There’s even a coloring book available online, so you too can shade the mugs of Conor Oberst and Marlon Brando for only $4.

“What I love about Omaha—and why it inspires me—is it has a small-town feel but in a big-city atmosphere. I haven’t found that elsewhere,” Couse says.

Couse has further made an impact in the community through his creative freelance work. Often collaborating with branding agency Secret Penguin, he’s helped design packaging for Eat Fit Go, design signs for Flagship Commons, and developed promotional material for
“We Don’t Coast.”

As if all that combined with balancing a full-time retail job and playing daddy to a newborn wasn’t enough, he also preps collections of his work to show at local galleries, with a recent exhibit at Harney Street Gallery.

“I’m always searching for ways I can do better in life, better in my craft,” Couse says.

With Omaha and all of its oddities keeping him so busy, art projects get done when he can find the time. If one makes him a sweet penny, then great. If not, that’s A-OK with Couse, too.

“My end goal is to have fun and inspire other people to create things,” Couse says. “It’s not complicated. I just hope my art makes people smile for even a second.”

And there’s nothing downright weird about that at all.

Visit christophervaughncouse.com for more information.

This article appears in the July/August 2017 edition of Encounter.

Christopher Couse

In Bloom

April 13, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Just as bright yellow dandelions emerge throughout the city in spring, Dandelion Pop-Up will re-emerge in the Greater Omaha Chamber Courtyard, adding a dash more culinary color to Omaha (at 13th and Harney streets).

Dandelion creator Nick Bartholomew says the weekly Friday lunch series featuring an ever-changing menu and rotating roster of all-star chefs is slated to return in late March 2017—though, like its flaxen-hued namesake, warmer weather will ultimately dictate its arrival. Bartholomew, who’s also behind beloved eateries The Market House and Over Easy, launched Dandelion Pop-Up in partnership with Secret Penguin so he could still contribute to the neighborhood after the M’s Pub fire put his Old Market restaurant on hiatus. The golden concept allows chefs to satisfy their creative cravings and lets diners sink their teeth into a unique edible experience.

Bartholomew wanted to offer seasoned chefs and up-and-comers alike the chance to break away from their daily bread, so to speak—to get creative, feed their passion, incubate new dishes and restaurant concepts, and have some fun.

“[At Dandelion] chefs can follow their passion with 100 percent creative control,” Bartholomew says. “They can test ideas and try out potentially off-the-wall stuff, then get feedback on their vision and see how it’s received before debuting it on a broader scale. I think the genius behind it is the versatility, which allows creativity, and that’s really engaging to the chefs. When the chefs are this excited, you know the food will be amazing.”

Dandelion began in July 2016 with Chef Tim Maides and his T.R.E.A.M. (Tacos Rule Everything Around Me) team, who started the party with chicken and vegan tacos that sold out early.

“It’s basically like a little playground for chefs to do something different, with a low risk and the chance to try out new flavors,” Maides says of Dandelion. “It’s similar for the people there to eat; it breaks up their normal downtown routine with a temporary option for lots of different flavors from different chefs in one location.”

“Tim is great, and we love doing the creative process together,” Bartholomew says. “The Chamber of Commerce has also been amazing. When we asked them about it, they didn’t think twice; they totally got Dandelion’s potential as an incubator and shared the vision.”

Since the Chamber doesn’t charge Bartholomew, he doesn’t charge the chefs, who keep all food profits. For his part, Bartholomew designs a signature lemonade corresponding with each Dandelion theme.

“For [Maides’ lunch] I did a cucumber-jalapeño lemonade that went great with his tacos,” says Bartholomew.

Next, Dandelion offered a barbecue lunch from chef Dan Watts, featuring his coffee-black-pepper-rubbed brisket. After a short hiatus, while Bartholomew updated the Chamber Courtyard kiosk’s infrastructure, Dandelion returned with lunches from heavy-hitter chefs like Joel Mahr, Jason Hughes, Dario Schicke, and Paul Kulik. Dishes included bahn mi burgers, pork steam buns, cevapi with pita, soul food such as chicken-andouille gumbo and fried green tomato grilled cheese, Parisian street vendor-style crepes, fried rice, bibimbap (a trial run for upcoming Bartholomew venture, Boho Rice), and other mouthwatering items.

Bartholomew is a proud Omaha native, and like his existing restaurants and soon-to-launch Boho Rice, he wants Dandelion to enhance the neighborhood it inhabits. He’s proud to say that the returning Friday tradition brings the often-dormant Chamber Courtyard to life.

“It’s awesome to see the courtyard with this buzz of activity now, and all these people just enjoying a sunny day, a lemonade, and some great food they can’t get anywhere else,” he says. “It’s a testament to Omaha being ready for these ideas and [customers] being loyal to what they like from certain chefs.”

Like the chefs and restaurants it promotes, Dandelion itself is still incubating. According to Bartholomew, there’s ample potential for the venture to grow like a weed in terms of scope and format, and he welcomes feedback from the public and pitches from chefs.

“I can’t always explain exactly what Dandelion is because I secretly want it to be everything,” Bartholomew says. “If anything, the format will just grow now that awareness is growing, and I hope Dandelion becomes something the city is proud of.”

Fittingly, Bartholomew wants to let Dandelion be a bit of a wildflower.

“We don’t want to tag its ear and process it yet because it’s kinda wild,” he says. “One of the things that makes Dandelion cool is that we’re not limiting it.”

Visit dandelionpopup.com for details and to register for updates on upcoming events.

This article was printed in the March/April 2017 edition of Omaha Magazine.