Tag Archives: Mutual of Omaha

Punk You

August 15, 2017 by
Photography by Keith Binder

You can call Brothers Lounge a “punk bar” and not get too much grief from so-called “punk purists.” However, calling Brothers a “punk bar” is like calling The Clash a “punk band.” Technically, it may be true, but both are so much more than that definition.

But to truly understand Brothers (located at 3821 Farnam St.), you must go back to its beginnings.

More than a decade before 1977 (or “The Year That Punk Broke”), three brothers—Joseph Jr., Ernest, and Robert “Bobby” Firmature—opened The Brothers Firmature. The Firmature brothers had already established themselves in the Omaha dining and bar community with establishments like the Gas Lamp and the Ticker Tape Lounge. For the first 20 years, The Brothers Firmature—located next to the Colonial Hotel at 38th and Farnam streets—was a cozy bar, complete with drapes on the windows and a tiny dance floor (where two dartboards reside today).

The Brothers Firmature’s patrons included insurance reps from nearby Mutual of Omaha, reporters for the Omaha World-Herald, and the occasional long-stay occupant of the Colonial. It also became a respite for a young Omaha couple—Trey and Lallaya Lalley.

Not yet married, the Lalleys operated the Capitol Bar, which was located downtown near 10th and Capitol streets. In its heyday under the Lalleys, the Capitol helped jumpstart Omaha’s burgeoning indie-rock scene by booking lots of local and national acts. The Lalleys would frequent The Brothers Firmature on Sundays, their only day off. The bar offered an escape from the demands of club management and music promotion.

“It was our secret spot for us and a few friends,” Lallaya recalls.

“It felt like your weird uncle’s cool basement,” Trey adds.

In the mid-’90s, after the Capitol Bar closed, Trey worked at the now-shuttered Theodore’s Bar located at Saddle Creek and Leavenworth streets. Lallaya ran the front of house at McFoster’s Natural Kind Cafe, which was located across the street from The Brothers Firmature on Farnam. The beloved organic restaurant shut down last year. Around 1997, Trey and Lallaya were approached by Robert Firmature about working at The Brothers Firmature in hopes that the two would eventually take over ownership. In the meantime, Bobby offered to mentor both Trey and Lallaya on the ins and outs of operating such an establishment.

“I knew how to smile and sell a beer, but I didn’t know how to do the books,” Trey says.

Trey and Lallaya took over Brothers in 1998. Some of the original decor remains (the original The Brothers Firmature sign, old movie posters like The Plainsman, starring Gary Cooper, and Riders in the Sky, starring Gene Autry), but the attitude of the place took on a new edge. In 2003, they were operating as owners. In 2012, they owned the building outright.

Edward Huddell has been coming to Brothers for almost 40 years. Sitting at the bar on a Friday night, sipping a lemonade, Huddell said he knew Robert Firmature, but connected more with Trey and Lallaya. During Huddell’s heyday, he would go to Brothers three or four times a week. His drink of choice: Rolling Rock or tequila shots.

“When I first came here, there was mostly Mutual of Omaha people. Then, after a while, it became more working-class people,” Huddell says. “When Trey and Lallaya took over, the average age of the patrons went down quite considerably.”

Trey and Lallaya’s personal touches are all over the bar. Brothers has become home to one of the most revered music jukeboxes in the Heartland, hosted a secret show by The Faint, and now serves as a sort of bridge between old neighborhood regulars and new patrons who are drawn to the renovated Blackstone District.

Visually, there are subtle indicators of Brothers’ punk aesthetic: the obligatory bathroom graffiti, black-and-white portraits of Joey Ramone, Nick Cave, and The Clash. But the obvious indicator is in its fabled jukebox. It’s one of the few in the city that contains actual physical CDs, chosen by the bar owners. Along with established icons including Bad Brains, X, and Dead Kennedys, it also plays beloved hardcore and punk staples like the Pornhuskers, Agent Orange, and the Circle Jerks.

Trey and Lallaya have a simple system regarding what goes into the jukebox: Both must agree on the CD. Having a bar where you can determine what is played has its advantages, but also some obvious drawbacks. The primary one being the risk of burning out on some of your favorite bands.

“It’s ruined some of my favorite records of all time for me,” Trey says. “What can’t I listen to anymore? Minor Threat. Black Flag, Slayer, and any Ramones song. Bands I cherished and love, I just wore into the dirt.”

Many of the institutions near Brothers have either went away (McFoster’s), or have dramatically revamped themselves (Sullivan’s). The rest of the businesses are part of the newer bars and eateries in the Blackstone District. The new businesses have given Brothers some new patrons, who mainly stop by more out of curiosity while bar-hopping than to hang out, Lallaya says.

“I call them ‘weekend tourists.’ They stop by once or twice, and they never come back,” she says.

Trey expressed some annoyance with the development around the bar. For months, it looked like Brothers was under construction as the high-end bar and kitchen eatery Stirnella, located next door, was being built. Parking has also become a problem, Trey says.

“I’m all for progress. I just really liked it the way it was before. People came here for a reason. It wasn’t just like ‘Oh, what’s this place. Let’s walk in and check it out.’ It was ‘Let’s go to Brothers.’”

One notable blogger of historic Omaha falls into the “Let’s go to Brothers”-style of patrons. She was so taken by the bar’s history that she penned an exhaustively researched piece about its history for her blog, My Omaha Obsession. Because of the sensitive nature of her job, she chose to remain anonymous, opting to use her pen name, “Miss Cassette.”

Miss Cassette spent months researching the history of the Brothers building. In a post titled “Brothers Lounge and the Case of the Vanishing Mom and Pop,” Miss Cassette used old articles from the Omaha World-Herald and The Omaha Daily Bee, as well as the Omaha city directory to trace the building’s history. Some key facts she discovered was that the spot where Brothers now resides used to be home to two separate businesses. Before the Firmature brothers bought the building, it was a grocery store and a self-service laundromat.

Miss Cassette began her research the same way she does most of her stories: by tracking down the city directory. “It starts with the address, then I see what shakes out,” she says. “It gets really rabbit hole-ish.”

In 2016, Brothers celebrated its 50th anniversary. Trey and Lallaya plan to keep Brothers operating long enough to justify another research piece by Miss Cassette. Don’t expect many changes to the bar, with the exception of more live shows. Lallaya says the number of live shows has grown from six to about 25 each year.

Trey says he can imagine running the bar for another 20 years, minus a week or two off a year for vacations.

“We don’t have an exit plan. This is it…We were in business to have a good time with our friends, not to make millions of dollars and sell out. Obviously, we did that,” Trey says with a laugh.

Visit facebook.com/brothersloungeomaha for more information.

This article appears in the July/August 2017 edition of Encounter.

From left: Trey and Lallaya Lalley

 

Larry Ferguson

August 6, 2016 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Berkshire Hathaway’s National Indemnity Company was searching for someone to memorialize its home office of more than 65 years before they relocated, they called upon Omaha artist and photographer Larry Ferguson.

“It’s what I do all the time. This is the kind of thing that I’m always involved in,” he says. For the past 35 years, Ferguson has documented the evolution of the cultural and industrial landscape of Omaha as it rapidly blooms.

“That’s just one of those things that I’m really known for—being able to make incredible documents that have an aesthetic sense about them, so that people want to have them. Not just for the information that’s there, but also for the aesthetics that are involved,” Ferguson says.

Ferguson learned that hard work is its own reward from his dad, during his childhood on the family farm near Alliance. His vast body of work is evidence of that. Whether documenting the weddings of Omaha’s elite or being commissioned by the Joslyn to visually capture priceless works of art, his photographic expertise is unrivaled.

He is chairman of the Omaha Public Art Commission, founded the group Public Art Omaha, and spent 10 years working with the Nebraska Arts Council’s artists-in-residence program. He also served as project director on a commission that performed preservation work on the Bostwick-Frohardt photography collection at The Durham Museum.

Ferguson specializes in fine art, commercial art, and social documentation. He describes his take-charge approach to those worlds as “intricately intertwined.” He is also trained in drawing, painting, ceramics, and sculpture. “I love art,” he says.

For two months Ferguson methodically shot every square inch of National Indemnity’s property, located on Harney Street near Mutual of Omaha, working from the outside before the leaves fell and then capturing the interior. He photographed the cafeteria where Berkshire Hathaway held their annual shareholder’s meetings in the 1970s and the tennis courts where former President Jack Ringwalt played.

Where others might see mundane ceiling tiles, Ferguson’s eye finds inspiration for captivating works of photographic art. His rare Cambo Wide camera offers an elongated panoramic format with a two-to-one ratio creating an extremely wide angle not often seen in photography. “For example, this is a little small 10×10 room but I’m able to stand in a corner and photograph almost the entire
room,” he says.

Ferguson’s images convey the values of strength, stability, and integrity on which the insurance company’s founders, Arthur and Jack Ringwalt, built the company. They believed every risk has a proper rate and that risky classes—such as long-haul trucks, taxis, rental cars, and public buses—should not be rejected. In plain language, Ferguson’s black-and-white photos tell the rich story of decades of promise.

“Real art in a work environment changes the workers,” Ferguson says. His photography will decorate the walls of the company’s new office, located in the Omaha World-Herald Building, serving as daily inspiration for the employees and a reminder of the company’s successful history.

Visit fergusonstudio.com for more information. Encounter

Larry-Ferguson

Morally Mute

March 3, 2016 by

“While at work a few months ago,” a local businessperson once related to me, “I was with a couple of employees talking not about anything in particular, just chatting about random things.

One of the people brought up another co-worker’s sexuality (they were not present). This person was very vocal about their beliefs and disgust of homosexuality. I was uncomfortable with the comments being made. I picked up my coffee mug and said, ‘I have to get to work’ and left. But afterwards I felt guilty. Should I have done something differently?”

The uncomfortable situation concerned sexuality, but it could just as easily have been about a coworker’s race, religion, or economic status. Someone talks negatively about a co-worker and the words cut deep. We don’t agree, but remain silent. Then we chastise ourselves for our weakness. We hit ourselves. We are bad, bad, bad for not being stronger.

But then again, are we weak and bad? Or are we just smart? The workplace is about getting the job done. When is it our role to engage a person in what could easily become a shouting match about ethics?

When we believe in our gut that something is wrong but don’t speak out about it, we are “morally mute.” Notice that muteness itself can sometimes be a good thing. Biologists tell us that it is a survival mechanism. It is a technique mankind learned in order to protect ourselves from the prowling lions and tigers. The species that knows how to remain silent in the face of danger is the species that outlives others.

On the other hand, muteness can also be a downfall. If we don’t scream when we see a car is about to run into us, a distracted driver may miss a potentially lifesaving alert. Making our presence known and not being mute can also be a very good thing.

So when is moral muteness right or wrong? When should we remain silent, and when
should we speak up at work?

An answer to these questions comes from reflecting on our motivations. Moral muteness is wrong when it is a result of rationalization. If we are silent about our moral beliefs just because we want don’t want to rock the boat, we want to fit in, or we don’t want to mess up the team, then we are rationalizing. These rationalizations tend to arise because of fear, but it is always our role to protect each other from the oncoming car, so to speak. And we might be scared because we don’t have the tools to express our beliefs in a way that doesn’t end in a shouting match, or analogously, that doesn’t run both the driver and the pedestrian off the road.

Like most things in life, moral muteness is overcome with practice.

Some of the best firms in Omaha have initiatives for employees to practice their communication skills in role-playing ethical scenarios with colleagues they trust. I know of at least 16 organizations that do this, both for-profit and non-profit: Access Bank, Arbor Bank, Avenue Scholars, Centris Federal Credit Union, the Douglas County Treasurer’s office, General Service Bureau/Early Out, Heartland Family Service, Hayes & Associates, Kiewit, Mutual of Omaha, NECA, NEI Global Relocation, OPPD, Seldin Company, and SilverStone Group.

These firms deserve a shout-out because they recognize that employees who know how to overcome moral muteness become stronger as individuals. Their teams are made hardier, more resilient. And those are assets that go straight to the bottom line.

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In the Middle of it All

December 1, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann and Leo A Daly

Chris Johnson graduated from college and looked left.

Then he looked right.

With sheepskin in hand—a degree in architecture from Iowa State—he went chasing his first job in the field.

But not at home.

“I thought the best design only occurred on the West Coast or East Coast,” Johnson says.
Turns out what he was looking for was right in front of him all along—Leo A Daly, one of the largest planning, architecture, engineering, interior design, and program management firms in the world.

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But Johnson, a native Omahan, didn’t know that Leo A Daly.

“It was almost embedded in me that they’re an Omaha firm just doing Omaha work,” Johnson says. “I wasn’t sure of their national or international design presence.”

He dug deeper.“Holy cow,” he recalls discovering, “there’s a great design firm right here doing things all over the world.”

Johnson joined Leo A Daly in 1990 and today is a vice president and managing principal in Omaha. His years with the firm are but one chapter in its extensive history. It was begun in 1915 by Leo A. Daly Sr. and remains in family hands with his grandson, Chairman and CEO Leo A. Daly III.

Early on, the firm indeed was Omaha-centric, its work featuring more than a handful of projects in and around the city for the Catholic church.

“Look at some of the turn-of-the-century Catholic churches and, more often than not, you’ll see Leo Daly on the cornerstone,” Johnson says.

But it was a much larger Catholic project that helped Leo A Daly become much larger—Boys Town.

The firm’s first major planning assignment came in 1922, creating the Boys Town master plan for Father Flanagan’s 160-acre campus that then was 10 miles west of Omaha. The relationship continues today as Leo A Daly has designed 90% of Boys Town buildings.

Leo a Daly's original rendering for Boys Town (1922).

Leo a Daly’s original rendering for Boys Town (1922).

Others in Omaha and beyond began to take notice.

“Boys Town really began to grow Leo Daly into a regional and national architecture and engineering firm,” Johnson says. That led to work for the healthcare market. Then came work for the federal government related to national defense.

Eventually, Leo A Daly went global. Today the privately held company’s portfolio includes projects in nearly 90 countries and all 50 U.S. states. Clients include public, private, and institutional organizations in sectors including aviation, commercial development, higher education, transit, and transportation. And while other firms in the industry increasingly become specialized, Leo A Daly has intentionally stayed multidisciplinary.

“We want to think holistically about these facilities, both during design and when they are operational,” Johnson says. “We really learn a lot from each other as far as innovation.”

That’s helped give the firm staying power. So, too, has a quality staff, Johnson says, and a marketplace that rewards “quality and innovation,” a statement backed by more than 500 design awards.

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The company has more than 800 design and engineering professionals in 32 offices worldwide—Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, Atlanta, Riyadh in Saudi Arabia, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere. Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam, an engineering, infrastructure consulting, and program management division of Leo A Daly, is in 18 cities.

But corporate headquarters remain in Omaha at almost its geographic center on Indian Hills Drive. The office boasts one of Omaha’s finest art collections, which has been amassed by the Daly family over the years.

“You’re really working in an atmosphere that elevates your game,” Johnson says of his surroundings.

Thank goodness for that Omaha presence. The city would be unrecognizable without such icons as First National Tower, Mutual of Omaha, Memorial Park, and other landmarks.

And Leo A Daly is building today the icons of tomorrow. Recent projects include the mixed-use development in downtown’s Capitol District, Nebraska Medical Center’s Nebraska Biocontainment Unit, and the relocation of Creighton University Medical Center to CHI’s Bergan Mercy Campus.

Also notable is the company’s transformation of the 1898 Burlington Passenger Station into a state-of-the-art television station for KETV. Among the project’s chief designers was Leo A Daly architect Sheila Ireland. Objectives included an initiative to keep the past visible where possible, allowing the building to tell its own story. Throughout the building are signs of the original 1898 Greek Revival design, its dramatic 1930s renovation, and updates from the 1950s. In one space, plaster from a bygone era has been cleverly framed as wall art. Even signs of the station’s 40-year vacancy remain visible.

Perhaps only a firm that’s been around nearly as long the station is wise enough, bold enough, to take such an approach.

“It’s exciting to work at a firm that has as much history with the city of Omaha as Leo Daly has,” Ireland says.

She hopes her work on the Burlington Station will help it last “hopefully for another 50 to 100 years.”

Chances are Leo A Daly will still be here—in the middle of it all.

Visit leoadaly.com to learn more.

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Mutual Interest

August 18, 2015 by
Photography by Malone & Co.

This article appears in Summer 2015 B2B.

He didn’t curse like anyone on The Osbournes or have the sex drive of a 16 & Pregnant regular, but before any of those cast members staked their claim to fame there was Marlin Perkins and Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom.

“Jim Fowler says it was the original reality TV show,” says Patty Malone. “It was really a new, forward-thinking kind of show different than anything else out there.”

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Adds her husband, Mike: “They weren’t staging things for the most part. They set their cameras in the right place.”

Now the Malones are putting cameras in place with a Wild Kingdom reboot. The couple, principals in the commercial video and photography production company Malone & Co., are filming and producing webisodes of the iconic show, which ran Sunday nights from 1963 to 1988.

It’s been more than a quarter-century since the original show’s curtain call, but the name Wild Kingdom still resonates. “We run into people all over and they have very fond memories of that show, that time in their lives,” Patty says.

Mike has taken photos for Wild Kingdom sponsor Mutual of Omaha for more than 20 years, producing images for annual reports, other publications, and the web. When the insurance company celebrated 50 years of the show in 2013, it called again on his eight-person company to produce a 21st-century version of it.

The process began with a national search for a “wild guide” host. That was claimed by South Dakota native Stephanie Arne, a one-time intern at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium.

Malone’s team first produced a webisode on “Reef Madness,” exploring efforts to save coral reefs in the Florida Keys. Then came webisodes on buffalo in Custer State Park, the invasive Tegu lizard wreaking havoc in the Everglades, and on the California condor. The second season featured elephants, cheetahs, giraffes, and penguins. The third season, airing this spring, features leopards, sea otters, kangaroos, and manatees.

Episodes of the show, which has generated nearly 3.5 million views in three years, can be viewed at wildkingdom.com (as can clips from the orMalone&Co4iginal show).

The episodes usually are filmed within two to three days. Mike says he often has competing reactions to assignments: “The first one, of course, is, ‘This is great. We’re really excited to be doing this.’ Then it’s, ‘How the heck are we going to make this happen?’”

The longtime photographer had done some work with dogs and cats, and even cattle for an agricultural client. “Nothing this level,” though, he says.

His most memorable session so far, he says, was filming condors with assistance from the Ventana Wildlife Society. “Half a dozen flew over the top of us and the sound of the wind through their wings is really unforgettable. They made me a little intimidated, but they have no interest in you because you’re not a carcass.”

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Thanks to his crew’s efforts, Wild Kingdom is alive and well, too.

There are differences from the original series with Marlin. Most notable, perhaps, is that episodes aren’t filmed in the wild. Rather, today’s Wild Kingdom partners with entities such as Tanganyika Wildlife Park in Kansas, the Los Angeles and Dallas zoos, and California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium. Those entities provide access to, and expert information about, animals and habitat.

Also, the webisodes are shorter than what aired on television. Malone and Co. produce a handful of segments on each topic, those running from two to three minutes each. The company also creates rich, ready-made content for various social media channels, provides a photo gallery, and quick “Fast Facts” videos with the bubbly, energetic Arne.

What’s similar? The same great animals and the same great storytelling.

“You can provide people both young and old an understanding of the animal kingdom,” Mike says. “That’s still the same. Especially young people watching these. We get a lot of feedback from teachers using these in the classroom.”

Malone&Co1

Children’s Scholarship Fund of Omaha

December 2, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Sandra Reding can recount many rewarding moments in her career as a fundraiser, but her current job helping parents find the right educational option for their children is one of the most rewarding.

As Executive Director of the Children’s Scholarship Fund of Omaha, Reding, in essence, is helping parents access the right school for their kids—families who otherwise might not have that option.

“Every family has a story,” Reding says. “Every parent wants to make the best choice for their kids, and if the best for them is sending them to a private school, that’s why we’re here. One type of education doesn’t fit every child. If you are a low-income family and the right education is a private or parochial school, and you are a qualifying family, we are there to help.”

With the help of many of Omaha’s leading businesses and business leaders, CSF provides low-income families with the choice of where their child will attend K-8. Once a child receives a scholarship, the organization will continue to provide a scholarship until they graduate from 8th grade. It also provides the child’s siblings with the same level scholarship. There are three different scholarship levels based on income.

The organization has students in 80 schools across Omaha and northeast Nebraska and is destination neutral, meaning the family chooses the school and the scholarship follows the student.

Reding spoke recently of a family she met who had a little girl in kindergarten who was having an awful time in school. She’d cry every day and even had to repeat the grade. She’s now in a private school and is thriving.

What’s compelling, she says, is that the families are making their own financial contributions of $500 each year to receive a scholarship.

“Just getting to meet those families and hear those stories was incredible,” says Reding of a recent event where families and donors were brought together. “I would like for all the donors and potential donors to have that same opportunity and know that a small gift, a small investment, can have such a dramatic impact.”

The CSF is heavily funded by a number of local businesses and community leaders such as Gov. Pete Ricketts, Mutual of Omaha, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Performance Auto Group, Mutual of Omaha and the Omaha World-Herald. A number of local foundations, including the Lozier Foundation, have also been involved in the funding.

“The business community is becoming more and more involved in working to improve education outcomes, trying to improve the education landscape in Omaha,” Reding said. “In doing so, they are helping better prepare our workforce. The business community is extremely active in helping to shape the workforce of the future.”

Reding says the Scholarship Fund has been in Omaha 15 years, funding 27,000 scholarships and dispersing $25 million. Over the last three years, funding efforts have increased dramatically, but the need is ever growing. The group awarded $2.1 million this school year, an increase of about $400,000.

But the need is still great. Reding said the demand for scholarships continues to outpace the availability. This year CSF had more than 500 scholarships that went unfunded. There are so many parents who want more for their kids, she says.

“Every parent out there has a dream for their child and we are helping them find a path to fulfilling that dream,” Reding says. “It all starts with getting their child in the right learning environment. If you are a donor and looking for an organization where you can make a difference and want to empower families who are making the sacrifice, invest in a child and invest in a family doing everything they can to help a child get the right education. Take a chance on a child and a family.”

Reding says a lot of credit goes to the staff at CSF, whom she described as “very dedicated and amazing.”

“We have a really dedicated and generous board,” Reding adds. “Their commitment to our mission, their level of engagement, is allowing us to broaden our reach more than ever. I’ve had the chance to work with some great community leaders.”

Before becoming CSF’s first ever full-time executive director, Reding was the President of the Joslyn Art Museum Foundation. She has also served as Director of Development at Lauritzen Gardens and as Vice President for Institutional Advancement at College of Saint Mary.

Reding grew up in Granville, Iowa, and attended Granville Spalding Catholic High School. She is also a graduate of both Briar Cliff College in Sioux City, Iowa, and Iowa State University.

Reding says fundraising is a way of making a tangible impact in the lives of others.

“Everyone wants to find meaning in their work,” she says. “I’ve been fortunate enough to work for some great organizations. I’ve been really lucky.”

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Bringing Community Responsibility to Life

May 25, 2013 by

Pythons. Hooded Pitahuis. Pygmy Marmosets.

Omaha is known by many across the nation because of Wild Kingdom, Mutual of Omaha’s primetime television show that brought animals to life in our living rooms.

But the show’s impact has been more profound for us (Omahans) than it has ecologically speaking. We identify with and claim the show’s reputation as our own. We feel community pride because, after all, it’s Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. This pride generates a strong sense of community responsibility. So maybe not coincidentally, community responsibility is accepted as one of the five Omaha City Values.

Wild Kingdom is one of the coolest examples in Omaha of what is called “traditional philanthropy.” This kind of philanthropy refers to the age-old practice of companies making cash donations or in-kind contributions to worthy causes. Most companies participate in traditional philanthropy because of their sincere desire to be involved in their communities and/or to give something back. Traditional philanthropy promotes reciprocity that produces important business benefits, including increased customer loyalty, higher employee retention, and enhanced corporate reputation.

As compared to traditional philanthropy, strategic philanthropy is a concept that has grown in prominence since the 1990s. This kind of charity involves a process where companies align their community relations initiatives with their core business products and services. Instead of a Wild Kingdom animal television show sponsored by an insurance firm (What’s the connection there?), corporations donate to specific community projects that align with their core competencies. For example, ConAgra does strategic philanthropy by focusing its charity on food and hunger issues, like Kids Cafés.

Some organizations are finding ways to impact their communities through employee engagement practices. Firms like PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) recognize that young professionals crave choice. So they’ve created an innovative program for performance incentives that offers a choice to support a cause in their name. Every staff member gets to choose how they receive their incentive—cash, a charity match, a tech package, or a gift card. This is an ingenious way to bring community responsibility to life.

At the furthest end of the community responsibility spectrum are social enterprises. These organizations flip the capitalist model on its head. Maximizing profits is no longer the purpose of these businesses. Profit is a means to a broader end of enhancing the well-being of the community. Nonprofits, as well as for-profits like Herman Miller, Grameen, and PlanetReuse, are bringing community responsibility to life in this way. Their employees and clients are supporting their model with extreme loyalty.

From traditional philanthropy to social enterprise, we challenge Omaha businesses to continue to enjoy the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards that come from bringing community responsibility to life. And don’t forget—a sense of community responsibility starts with our kids. One of the ways the Business Ethics Alliance has promoted this is with our team of moral superheroes who live in the Itty Bitty City at the Omaha Children’s Museum. Take your kids to the museum and kick-start their sense of community responsibility by spending time with superhero Reese.

Beverly Kracher, Ph.D., is Executive Director of Business Ethics Alliance and Chair of Business Ethics & Society at Creighton University’s College of Business.

It’s Hockey Time in Omaha!

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann and Jeff Beiermann

Omaha may not appear to be a hockey town to the casual observer, but you don’t have to peel back the layers too far to find evidence of such.

The University of Nebraska-Omaha and Omaha Lancers, who carry the hockey banner in Omaha, have consistently played quality hockey with the Mavericks making two trips to the NCAA Tournament in their 15 years of competition, while the Lancers have accumulated more United States Hockey League Championships (13) than any other USHL teams since they joined the league in 1986.

And fan support has and continues to be second to none.

UNO Mavericks

The University of Nebraska-Omaha Maverick hockey team.

“Omaha is a good hockey town,” UNO Mavericks head coach Dean Blais says. “We’re near the top of the country in terms of attendance on a yearly basis. The support from the fans is huge and their commitment is extremely important to our program.”

Mike Aiken, Lancers head coach and general manager, adds, “Omaha has always had a strong hockey following, and it’s only getting better. There’s great development within the youth league and with the new arenas providing additional ice time that will only increase.”

This winter Omaha hockey will get another boost as an unique event will be held at TD Ameritrade Park. The Mutual of Omaha Battles on Ice February 9 will feature a doubleheader as both Omaha squads entertain two of their fiercest rivals. The Mavericks take on the North Dakota Fighting Sioux while the Lancers face the Lincoln Stars.

“This area turns out some good kids with the strong youth hockey program, and I think that development will grow with the addition of hockey facilities in the city.” – Dean Blais, head coach of UNO Mavericks hockey team

“The concept came from the Omaha Lancers and the doubleheader gave us the best chance of having a successful event such as this,” comments Harold Cliff, the President of the Omaha Sports Commission. “We wanted meaningful games and to provide something different at another one of the great Omaha venues. Omaha is a great sports community. These teams have competed well in the past and this is another opportunity to display their talents. With the doubleheader we’ll also be able to provide two different types of hockey and expect strong attendance. It may not be something we can do annually, but we’ll measure the response and this could grow. A lot depends on support. Sponsors also play a large part, and Mutual of Omaha stepped up in a big way for this year. Local hockey interest remains strong, and we are confident this will be a successful event.”

Omaha Lancers practice at Ralston Arena.

Omaha Lancers practice at Ralston Arena.

Blais and Aiken echo Cliff’s excitement for this upcoming event and believe it’s a great opportunity to showcase their teams.

“It will be an awesome event,” Aiken says. “With us playing Lincoln, which is one of the best rivalries in the league, it should be a great experience for the players and fans alike.”

It’s undoubtedly an exciting time for hockey in Omaha as this season the Lancers began play in the brand-new Ralston Arena.

“We’ve moved into an unbelievable building, and we feel fortunate to have such a facility,” says Aiken. “Our facilities are second to none and give us the opportunity to recruit the best players out there. We’re more than hockey, it’s an entertainment package. A fan friendly atmosphere with great hockey, which people can really enjoy. We get involved with the community quite a bit, and we plan to continue to promote our organization through the good people who are a part of it.”

UNO will also be changing home ice in the future after announcing plans in late 2012 to build an on-campus arena to host indoor Maverick athletics including hockey.

UNO Mavericks play Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs in November.

UNO Mavericks play Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs in November 2012.

“This area turns out some good kids with the strong youth hockey program, and I think that development will grow with the addition of hockey facilities in the city,” Blais explains. “More kids will be able to get ice time, which will be great for the future. Our future goals include winning a national championship. As we move into a very good conference (WCHA), it will help with recruiting. We like the state of our program and what we think we’ll be able to accomplish in the future.”

That future looks bright, for all those involved and interested in Omaha hockey, thanks to the commitment from the organizations, community, and fans alike.

Justin Schafer’s Mid-Century Modern Coffee Table

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Justin Schafer, a senior graphic designer with Mutual of Omaha, first discovered his fascination with Mid-Century Modern design while studying in college. “[MCM] transformed how we perceived objects and furniture in our homes…The idea that things could be functional, beautiful, and have a streamlined aesthetic is something I gravitated toward. [MCM furniture] was the first to blur the line between something that is purely functional and a piece of art.”

Inspired by his dad (“Growing up, my father was always building something from scratch or fixing something…”) and the works of husband-wife Modern designers Ray and Charles Eames and others, Schafer looked for ways he could express his “right-brain creative side” through furniture design. “I love to look online at Modern furniture stores, but everything in those stores is priced higher…That’s a big reason I finally decided to stop hunting and just build [things] myself.”20121119_bs_4401 copy 2

Looking to DIY blogs and magazines for ideas, Schafer came up with a design for a MCM-inspired coffee table. “I sketched numerous ideas, gradually refining them until I had a solid plan with measurements.” Almost all of the necessary supplies were purchased at a local hardware store, he said. One-quarter-inch birch plywood, layered four planks thick and edges mitered, produced the tabletop base. Raw steel pipe, bent in a classically MCM ‘hairpin’ shape and purchased on eBay for $45, was used for the table legs. A wire brush was used to ‘clean’ the steel pipe. Then L-shaped brackets secured the legs to the tabletop. Lastly, Schafer spray-painted the steel legs black, adding several coats of clear enamel for durability, and glued a cherry veneer over the top of the birch. Wood stain gave the tabletop a rich, dark brown hue. In total, the cost of the project was “minimal, about $100,” Schafer said. “If you tried to buy a similar table in a store, it would probably have cost $200-300.”20121119_bs_4378 copy

Schafer said the most difficult aspect of the project was getting the 45-degree plywood cuts to line up perfectly on each corner of the tabletop. “That’s always a bit tricky, especially if your saw settings are a few degrees off. I’ve learned, however, that it’s best to slow down and take your time.”

Today, the table sits in Schafer’s Midtown apartment, which he shares with his wife, Libby. He loves it when friends visit and, impressed with the table, ask him where he got it. “It’s nice to be able to say I built it from scratch,” he shares. “There’s a satisfaction and pride that comes with saying that.” That pride has spurred him onto other projects, including a similarly built desk and a padded headboard, framed with solid walnut planks.