Tag Archives: makeup

Storybook Cosmetics

July 26, 2018 by
Photography by provided

Developing a cruelty-free cosmetics company may not have been the dream with which they started, but Maynard triplets Erin, Mandy, and Missy have combined their individual talents to make fantasy a reality.

Storybook Cosmetics is an online business they created after Missy introduced her sisters to high-end makeup about 10 years ago. At first, Mandy and Erin were worried about her “obsession.” Missy would spend $80 on a single brush. The two were slowly swayed and that love of high-end product influenced their decisions when creating their own line. The self-proclaimed “nerds” drew inspiration from their interests and channeled them into those products. 

Erin says she would often spend nights researching “how to start a cosmetics company” on the internet. But she didn’t get far. “Labs will not even talk to you if you’re an indie brand. You need hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

Erin sent drawings to her manufacturer from a previous online business. She surprised Erin one day by producing a prototype of their Wizard Wand Makeup Brushes. When Erin posted the picture of them on her Instagram account, the post blew up—engagement was in the thousands in about five minutes. She quickly removed it and the sisters decided to post it on a Storybook Cosmetics account they had created but had not used yet. The account went from 9,000 to over 100,000 followers “in a matter of days.” They started pitching themselves to beauty magazines right away, and publications  like InStyle, Allure, and Teen Vogue started writing about them. Their social media was inundated with questions and comments. 

The women knew this was their chance. Erin started at the top of the list of cosmetics labs she’d previously contacted. “I said, ‘Yeah we’re the creators of the magic wand makeup brushes,’ and they were like, ‘Please hold.’ They signed us on that day.” 

The brushes launched the brand, but there is a constant buzz around all of their products. 

“Honestly, we have a really loyal, awesome following.” she says. “Everything since then has been almost as successful.” So successful that they are now a multi-million dollar company. All from a $500 prototype.

Initial orders of brushes were shipped out of their mother’s living room in Omaha. Friends and family filled the house for three weeks during the Christmas season to help box products. Erin says it’s great being based in Omaha because it’s cheaper than if everything was based out of L.A., especially with the help of their extensive support system—the triples are three of six sisters. 

Roxane Cosgrove, a friend of their younger sister Erica, is not surprised by their success. The triplets’ interest in makeup was evident early on, as Cosgrove recalls going over to their house while she was in middle school. “The triplets lived in the basement and they would give us makeup tutorials.” She remembers looking up to them, and is quick to mention that their mom is also a “superstar.” “They were always really innovative: the whole family is,” she says. “They were always figuring something out and they were always hard workers.” Besides that, she adds, “the Maynards have always been nerds at heart.” 

While having their support system around is key, the fact that Missy lives out west has its advantages. The triplets’ work is often based on popular movies or books, such as their Mean Girls Burn Book Palette, and it’s much easier for her to set up and get to meetings. And, according to Erin, she’s the right person to have in those meetings. “Missy is our mouthpiece, basically. She gets us all of our licensing,” she says, later adding, “She’s like the licensing whisperer.”

Each of the girls brings something unique to the table. Mandy is the graphic designer and artist, so she handles the creative side. Erin says she is good at “the boring stuff,” dealing with logistics and manufacturing. “It’s very bizarre, but we like to say when we combine we make one normal superhuman.”

While the business is currently only online, they are working on funding to branch into retail. A bigger investor can help them get to the next level. Erin says they have stores that are interested, but currently they can’t fill the orders. “That’s kind of the hurdle that we’re at right now in our growth,” she says, adding that it’s “obviously a good hurdle to have.”  


To learn more, visit storybookcosmetics.com.

This article was printed in the August/September 2018 edition of B2B.

from left: Missy, Erin, and Mandy Maynard

Brush With Greatness

August 3, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

People don’t spend much time contemplating the products made by Omaha’s NAGL Manufacturing Company, but many certainly depend on them. Consider NAGL’s top product, the humble nail polish brush. When people apply a fresh coat of color to their toenails or fingernails, they typically think about the polish’s hue and brand, but it is rare to stop and consider the origin or merit of the tiny little brush that applies the paint to make one’s digits pop.

Anyone who has used nail polish in the past 80-plus years has almost certainly used a NAGL-made brush. Carl J. Nagl started the company in the mid 1930s in its original location near Johnny’s Cafe in South Omaha.

“We produce [brushes] for all the major nail polish brands,” says Erica McDonald, controller at NAGL. “NAGL used to make a wider variety of cosmetic brushes, but now we primarily do nail polish brushes and anything that might look like a nail polish brush but is used to apply something else.”

NAGL, currently the world’s largest supplier of nail enamel brushes, produces brushes and/or bottles for beloved brands like CoverGirl, OPI, Revlon, Avon, L’oreal, Sally Hansen, Maybelline, and many others.

“Every nail polish brand, really,” McDonald confirms.

While you would not think of a nail polish brush as a product requiring forward thinking, NAGL does their own development, like their flow-through brush, as well as customizing and creating per customer request. It might not happen daily, but they have created brushes for Essie’s gel couture bottle with a twisted design and Christian Louboutin’s striking, stiletto-esque bottle toppers.

“We are happy to accommodate customer-driven changes that allow for their own take on a brush or product,” McDonald says. “Customers come to us with an idea in mind, then we show them what’s possible within their budget and limitations. We like to give them the flexibility to do whatever they want.”

The company, currently located at 36th and Martha streets, changed hands several times and was eventually purchased in 2003 by Team Technology Inc., which helped NAGL branch into medical, dental, and automotive markets.       

In addition to making 2.5 million brushes every single day, NAGL annually produces more than 84 million oral swabs for use in medical facilities. The company also creates brushes for automotive touch-up paint, model kits, super glue, and antifungal solutions, plus caps, bottles, packaging solutions, a vibrating flosser, and more.    

“If you’d asked me before I started here, I would’ve guessed that this nail polish bottle, cap, and brush came from China,” McDonald says. “But it comes from Omaha, Nebraska. It’s kind of wild that these everyday products that you rely on to enhance your beauty come from here—much less this residential neighborhood.”   

In addition to being made-in-the-USA, the company prides itself on its sustainability practices.

“We distill 100 percent of our acetone and lacquer, and recycle the sludge that remains from distillation. This saves nearly 6,000 gallons of these hazardous substances from going into landfills each year and remains well below EPA requirements,” McDonald says. “We also reduced our waste output by 50 percent, starting in 2014, by implementing a full-facility recycling program. With a very plastics-heavy operation, it’s very important to protect the health and sustainability of our environment.”

Despite changes in ownership and product lines over the years, McDonald says NAGL remains a workplace that inspires employee loyalty. McDonald’s predecessor was with NAGL for 35 years, and human resources manager June Jones has worked there since the 1960s.

“It’s neat to work somewhere you’re actually making the product that you’re selling,” McDonald says. “You get more invested, and our team’s involved in the entire process.” 

Visit naglmfg.com for more information.

This article was printed in the Summer 2017 edition of B2B.

A Date Night In

January 31, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Omaha Models: Bess Warming and Dan Lehmann

Hair and makeup: Kat Ferm, Creative Hair Design


Stylists: Shan Stavropoulos, Luvbird Boutique; 
Emma Headley, Scout Dry Goods & Trade

Special thanks to Back in the Day

 Luvbird Boutique
 2110 S 67th St., No. 120

 Scout Dry Goods & Trade 
5019 Underwood Ave.

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The invitation

“What are we doing for Valentine’s Day?” he asked.

She looked at him blankly, then laughed. “Pizza, TV, and sweatpants? You know, like last year?” It had been a long day. Her students were getting into basic algebra, and her kids were getting into everything.

“Tradition is important,” he admitted, “but what if we switched things up? Dinner, music, something nice?”

He was serious, she realized. “Well, okay, but the kids? We can’t ask your mom to watch them again. And how nice? I mean, we did just come up with a new budget.”

His smile was mysterious. Lofty. “Wear something fun. I’ve got this.”

The planning

It was Valentine’s Day, and she was staring into the depths of her closet. Fun? she thought. Well, she had a few new things from Luvbird Boutique that she hadn’t had a chance to wear yet. The plum fleece leggings would work with that crocheted tunic and the long camisole. The jeweled headband was a bit more whimsical than she was used to, but if she threw on that knotted pearl necklace from Scout Dry Goods & Trade along with their suede ankle boots

She nodded at herself in the mirror. Perfectly boho chic.

Her phone beeped. His text read: Meet me in the living room.

“What?” she whispered, but she couldn’t stop a grin. She didn’t exactly run downstairs.

He was sitting in front of the fireplace, surrounded by old vinyl and an antique, portable record player. With his denim jacket, flannel shirt, and black skinny jeans from Scout, he looked straight out of a 1960s ad. She was pleasantly surprised to see the leather cuff and black ankle boots. He had laughed when she’d given them to him. “Accessories are everything,” she’d replied.

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The music

He looked up and grinned. “I promised Mom we’d make her dinner next week. We’ll get the kids tomorrow morning.”

“Look who’s so proud of himself,” she said, kneeling next to him. She flipped over a record. “The Bee Gees?”

He took it from her and set it in the player. “FYI, every time you criticize my selection, you owe me a serenade before dinner.”

She raised her eyebrows. “I haven’t touched the guitar in years.”

“I haven’t played the piano since college. We’ll risk it.”

The love

Three 45s later, he asked, “You hungry?”

“What about those serenades? I seem to owe you six.”

He laughed. “You go change for dinner. I’ll cut it down to two.”

“Change? What is this, Downton Abbey?”

“I thought it could be fun to really pull out all the stops. I personally am going to wear a bow tie.” He smoothed an invisible mustache.

She cocked her head. “I see your bow tie, and I raise you high heels and a dress.”

That off-the-shoulder emerald dress from Luvbird would do, she thought as she raced back upstairs. With their blue teardrop necklace. And Scout had some great white lace tights the last time she went in. And those leather peep-toe pumps too.

She heard the soft strains of their tiny upright before she came back into the room. Hm. The shawl-neck sweater and dark-wash jeans from Scout fit him better than she remembered.

She tapped him on the shoulder. “Scoot over, college boy.”

He grinned and never stopped playing.

 

RAW Aesthetics

January 22, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Other than a rather arid climate and the identical first four letters of their names, Australia and Austin, Tex., share little in common, but those are the places that cemented an artistic vision for Amber Keller.

“I had worked a couple graphic design jobs here [in Omaha] before I realized something was missing,” Keller says, “so I sold most of my belongings, threw my art supplies in the car, and hit the road, creating as much art as I could along the way.” It was when she unpacked her bags in Austin for a few months in 2011 that she discovered RAW: Natural Born Artists, an international nonprofit program that acts as an incubator for new and emerging artists. They described themselves, Keller recalls, as being “for artists, by artists.”

“I did my first RAW show in Austin,” says the woman who is now director of Omaha’s RAW affiliate. “I knew the model could succeed here because our city has such a strong arts community. There’s just an amazing amount of talent here.”

Before returning to Omaha, Keller further satisfied her wanderlust by paring down her already meager possessions to backpack through Australia, where she did a RAW show in 2012.

RAW held its first annual local RAWards Semi Finals in November at Sokol Auditorium. Three finalists in nine disciplines showed their work to vie for the honor of winning a shot to advance to nationals in Los Angeles. Artists competed in the categories of visual arts, photography, film, music, performance, fashion, accessories, makeup, and hair.

Amber Keller’s look is thanks to a few RAW:Omaha artists: Her dress is by Haus of Donna Faye, her earrings by Juan Mora-Amaral, makeup by Lyndee Marie, bodypaint by Alyssa Keller, and haircolor and style by Tammy Cox.

Amber Keller’s look is thanks to a few RAW:Omaha artists: Her dress is by Haus of Donna Faye, her earrings by Juan Mora-Amaral, makeup by Lyndee Marie, bodypaint by Alyssa Keller, and haircolor and style by Tammy Cox.

The L.A.-based RAW now operates in 60 American cities along with an increasing footprint in foreign countries. Omaha’s roster of 120 RAW artists ranges in age from 17 to near retirement age, and various artists displayed their work in a series of four showcases throughout 2012. There are no membership fees to become a RAW artist, but showcase participants are expected to sell tickets to the events so that RAW reaches the widest possible audience.

“RAW helps build an artistic community, but we do it as team,” Keller says. “The semi-final event was a competition, yes, but we’re still working together, not against each other. RAW helps foster collaborations between artists, and we support each other here in Omaha in a way that is kind of rare for a city our size.”

Tim Guthrie, a visual artist and experimental filmmaker who is a Creighton University professor of journalism, media, and computing, was one of three judges for the event. Joining Guthrie on the panel were Andrew Norman of the music-centric Hear Nebraska and Shane Bainbridge of design-focused The New BLK.

“It wasn’t that long ago that I didn’t know anything about RAW,” says Guthrie, “which is almost kind of appropriate in that it parallels the theme of what RAW does in terms of building visibility for artists. Omaha’s art scene is amazing, but it can be a little cliquish. It’s still a very friendly atmosphere, but there is a hint of ‘the haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ when it comes to being widely known. With a lot of dedication and hard work from these artists, it is my hope that RAW helps more of them into the category of ‘the haves.’”

RAW Artists 
Advancing to 
Nationals:

Film: Rob Kasel

Visual Art: Madeleine Thoma

Photography: Michelle Woitzel

Fashion: Haus of Donna Faye

Makeup: Lyndee Marie

Hair: Brogan

Accessories: Casey Jones

Performing Art: Flying Eagles Acrobalance Troupe

Music: Omaha Street Percussion

Work and videos by these and other RAW artists may be seen at 
rawartists.org.

BB and CC Creams

September 24, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

You may have seen the commercials with actress Kate Hudson and other makeup-brand personalities talking about their revolutionary BB and CC creams. You might also have thought, “I have no idea what those words mean.”

That’s because BB and CC creams are fairly new to Americans—or at least to most Americans in the Midwest.

The original version of what is now BB Cream was created in the 1960s by German dermatologist Dr. Christine Schrammek to protect and heal the skin of her patients. Eventually, the cream found its way into Korea and Japan in the 1980s and was advanced. In fact, BB cream became the well-kept beauty secret of many Asian celebrities. Now, however, these creams are a huge hit in practically every beauty market across the world, including our own.

Still, most people don’t exactly know what the creams are (or, more importantly, what they do). Fortunately, Joel Schlessinger, M.D., FAAD, FAACS, of LovelySkin in Omaha has the answers.

First of all, BB Cream stands for “beauty balm,” and CC Cream stands for “color corrective.” Again, these words might mean little if you don’t know what balms and color correctors do.

According to Dr. Schlessinger, BB is a multitasking cream that serves as a moisturizer, primer, foundation, and even sunscreen. CC also functions in several ways, providing the same benefits as BB but with an added bonus: color correction. For women with uneven skin tone, acne, or redness, CC seems to be the better option.

“CC creams can be very beneficial for acne-prone or oily complexions due to their lighter formulation and full coverage,” Dr. Schlessinger adds. “Investing in a good CC cream can shorten your daily routine, enhance your skin’s appearance, and prevent premature aging.”

So what’s the main difference between the two creams? “Coverage and weight,” says Dr. Schlessinger. “CC creams tend to be lighter with better coverage while BB creams are heavier and typically don’t offer full concealing benefits.”

Of course, both save you money and time. For example, one CC cream can replace foundation, moisturizing cream, facial primer, sunscreen, and concealer. Let’s face it—anything that shortens a daily beauty routine and lessens makeup expense is greatly appreciated.

Wondering where you can get BB and CC creams? Pharmacies, grocery stores, makeup outlets, skin care retailers, online shopping—they’re everywhere. Budget-friendly brands like Almay, Clinique, Garnier, and L’Oreal have begun releasing their own versions. Makeup store Sephora carries several professional makeup brands. And, of course, Dr. Schlessinger’s LovelySkin sells brands like Supergoop!, jane iredale, Stila, Dr. Brandt, Dr. Dennis Gross, and B. Kamins.

LovelySkin is located near Oak View Mall at 2929 Oak View Drive. For more information about these products, visit lovelyskin.com.

Making Summer Fashion Decisions

June 20, 2013 by
Photography by Jim Scholz

The summer wardrobe of any and everyone over 60 is a definite challenge to coordinate.

I just tell it like it is: A body that’s older than 60, even slim and in the best shape, needs more camouflage than exposure. If you care about how you look to others, shorts and short skirts are of a previous life. I’ve never seen pretty knees on anyone over 60.

The length of capris is very personal. Find the length that looks best on you and have your capris hemmed there. When wearing capris, the shoes or sandals you wear with them are very important for making a style statement. Comfort matters, too, but you won’t be happy with your look if your summer footwear isn’t stylish. When wearing sandals, NO scaly skin and callouses allowed, and keep toenails polished to perfection!

Tank tops, halters, and tube tops are not necessarily of your past. You can still wear them but not alone. Under a cardigan sweater, a jacket, a stole, or a loose-fitting shirt, they can be fabulous! Use them to add a splash of color, print, or texture to monotone separates. Dark-colored ones can be very slimming. Sundresses…hmm. There are many cute ones that I love in fresh, young florals, but they are indeed for the young.

Blue denim can be dangerous at 60 or older. It has to be worn with an attitude, and it’s usually not the attitude that 60-and-overs have. Comfort jeans are only to be worn around the house. Denim jumpers date, age, and frump you. But black denim, white denim, and fashion-colored denim jeans and jackets are must-haves! Be sure, however, to buy a cut that flatters you. The cut is not about your age. It’s about your shape.

Summer clothes must look fresh. When you’re hot, whatever you’re wearing wrinkles. Press the wrinkles out of every piece you wear before you return it to the closet. If washing first is necessary, do it, but if a garment shows wear after washing, retire it. NEVER wash black cotton separates. They may say washable, but washing sucks the life and color out of them. Dry clean only! Linen is of its own world. Clients used to come to me saying, “I want you to design and make me linen clothes that don’t wrinkle.” Impossible. Linen wrinkles, regardless of how it’s designed, made, or treated. If you wear linen, you must accept wrinkles.

As for Summer 2013 colors, avoid pastels even if on-trend. They look fresh if you’re under 40 but give you a grandma look if you’re over 60. The colors best on you depend on their relationship to your hair and skin tones. To play it safe, wear black or white, together with orange, lime, or turquoise when you want to add some pop.

Accessories are what it’s all about. Use them to style and personalize your summer looks. Bold-colored beads on a loose linen shirt, a fringed stole over a tank top, or a studded belt hanging loose over a calf-length skirt can take your look from everyday/everybody to a unique and stylish you! Scarves are important but not by day when it’s hot. In the evening, they’re both useful and fashionable tossed over your shoulders to break the chill of the night and air conditioning. Summer purses should have a lighter look than the ones you carry through winter. Color, texture, and fabric should relate to the season and to what you’re wearing. If black is your color, choose a poplin, straw, or woven bag.

Summer hair and makeup should be easy care. A lipstick color change is often necessary, and if you wear foundation, a darker tone might be better. Always wear sunscreen!

Finally, swimwear, OMG, it creates a crisis for almost everyone, regardless of age. After 60, no bikinis except for home swims and tanning. There are plenty of flattering one- and two-piece swimsuits you’ll love, and many of them are shaped and color-blocked to slim you.

The season is short. Enjoy it with confidence knowing my advice will make the BEST of you!

I welcome your feedback and invite you to send questions to sixtyplus@omahapublications.com.

Mary Anne Vaccaro lives in Omaha. She designed and made couture clothing for an international clientele of professionals and socialites of all ages. She created ready-to-wear collections that were sold from her New York showroom, and she designed for the bridal industry. She designed for three Ak-Sar-Ben Coronation Balls and ran a fashion advertising business in five states for a number of years. Invisible Apron® is one of several products that she has designed and developed. She still designs for select clients and works as an image consultant, stylist, personal shopper, and speaker on the subjects of fashion, art, and style. For more information, visit maryannevaccaro.com or call 402-398-1234.

Rebecca Forsyth

March 25, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

“I think I always wanted to be a hairdresser,” says Rebecca Forsyth, 26.

With a mother as a receptionist in a hair salon, it’s no wonder that Forsyth aspired to work in a salon, as she spent a good deal of her childhood in one. As Forsyth got older, she veered from the cosmetology path and attended a traditional, four-year college. “At the end of it all, having cut all of my friends’ hair in my kitchen since high school, I realized hair was still where my heart was.”

Forsyth moved to Omaha about five years ago from Sioux Falls, S.D., to attend cosmetology school at Capitol School of Hairstyling and is currently a stylist at Bungalow/8 off 105th and Pacific Street. “It’s a fabulous and beautiful space, and I couldn’t dream of a better fit,” she says of the salon. “Everyone working there is so inspired and passionate.”

Hair color is Forsyth’s specialty. She’s an American Board Certified Haircolorist, an honor only attained by 1,700 stylists in the U.S. But she also has interests in styling. “I collaborate with a lot of photographers, fashion designers, and other creative types locally in both photo and video work, so I’m constantly working to help others realize their vision.” In addition to her hair coloring and styling credits, Forsyth has also developed a number of hairstyling tutorials with Sarah Lorsung Tvrdik, co-founder of Hello Holiday, an Omaha womens wear ecomerce site. The tutorials have been seen in magazines, reblogged, and pinned thousands of times on Tumblr and Pinterest.

“I haven’t worn pants in like seven years. I’m very into femininity but certainly a bit country and a bit rock and roll.”

From braids to blowouts to beehives, Forsyth says she loves it all. “My love of styling has really helped me to find ways to work on teaching my clients while they’re in my chair how to style their own hair at home. Before I was a hairdresser, I was always so frustrated that my hair would look great when I’d leave the salon, but I would be clueless about what to do with it when I was at home in front of the bathroom mirror. I’ve made it my mission to try to bridge that gap.”

Her clientele is very diverse, ranging from men and women, young and old. She also sees many clients with long hair and red hair. “I was a redhead myself for many years, which is likely where my eye for red comes from.”

As for her personal style, Forsyth describes her look as “a mixture of Brigitte Bardot, a Bradley doll, Dolly Parton, and a 1960s airline stewardess.” She explains that she’s very influenced by the late ‘60s big hair, lipstick, and winged eyeliner. “I haven’t worn pants in like seven years. I’m very into femininity but certainly a bit country and a bit rock and roll. You are as likely to find me in cowboy boots or a square dancing dress as you are to find me in a fabulous jumper and pair of heeled Mary Janes.”

Her favorite styling products and tools include:

  • Mason Pearson Popular Mixture hairbrushes—“It’s the Rolls Royce of brushes and has helped me produce amazing styling results.”
  • Kerastase’s Ciment Thermique—“Many of my blonde clients will tell you I’m also a huge fan. [It’s] a product that protects from heat and helps to rebuild broken and damaged hair. I’ve seen incredible results with it.”
  • Bumble and bumble Spray de Mode—“It holds fabulously and provides great texture and body but is still dry and brushable, which is great for re-styling and avoiding that 1980s shellac-ed look.”

Quit Aging Yourself

Every year, we spend tons of money to keep our faces looking youthful and tight. But what we don’t realize is that some of our bad beauty habits are actually making us look older than we are. Here are some seemingly “no-brainer” tips that will help you keep your face looking young and beautiful without spending a fortune on anti-aging products:

Find the Right Foundation.

Every woman has been guilty of those embarrassing foundation lines at some point in her life. What you might not know is that the appearance of those lines is usually a signal that you’re not using the right kind or color of foundation. Even worse, using the wrong foundation can speed up the process of aging of your skin. The best way to prevent both of these problems is to find the best foundation for your skin.

Before you even think about brands, you need to determine what kind of foundation works best with your skin type. Have dry skin? Look for “moisturizing” or “hydrating” foundations. Have oily skin? Look for “oil-free” or “matte” foundations. Have a combination of oily and dry skin? Look for “cream-to-powder” foundations. Or if that seems like too much of a hassle, look for mineral foundations, which go great with any skin type—especially sensitive skin.

After determining the right kind of foundation, you need to match the color to your skin tone. Despite what you might have heard about testing the color on your wrist, the best place to test a foundation color is actually on your jawline, as this is the area where foundation is most noticeable (Remember those lines?). Make sure you’re as close to natural light as possible—like outside or near a window—while testing colors since indoor lighting can make you choose to dark of a color. Whichever color blends or disappears into your skin tone during the test is the color you should get.

Don’t Overpluck Your Brows.

Some women prefer professional eyebrow threading or waxing. But for those of us that prefer to save cash and time, plucking is the way to go. The only problem with plucking is that, too often, we overpluck our brows, giving us an aged look. Actually, the fuller the brow, the more youthful you look. Now, “fuller” doesn’t mean you let your eyebrows go ungroomed—just don’t pluck them too thin.

Before plucking, wash your face, brush your brows up and out with a brow brush (a clean toothbrush works, too), and sit near a window with a good mirror. To determine your brow thickness, use an eye pencil and draw a line along the bottom edge of your brow, following the fullest, natural shape. Any hairs that fall below this line are okay to pluck. The general rule with plucking is to make sure your brow begins in line with the inner corner of your eye and ends in line diagonally with the bottom edge of your nose and the outer corner of your eye. You can use a ruler (or your tweezers, if they’re long enough) to check if everything is aligned. Any hairs outside of these measurements can be removed.

If your brows are naturally too-thin, or if you’ve overplucked and are trying to grow your brows back out, use powder or an eyebrow pencil to fill in the shape. Just make sure to match the powder or eyebrow pencil shade to your natural hair color so you don’t age yourself any further—or look like a cartoon villain.

Remove Makeup and Wash Your Face.

It’s hard to get in the habit of removing our makeup and washing our faces every night when we’re tired and just want to get in bed. But not removing your makeup or washing your face is one of the quickest ways to age your skin. Just think about the fact that the average woman today begins wearing makeup at age 12 and wears makeup into her 70s and 80s. That’s long-term damage.

If you don’t use all-natural makeup, there are tons of harsh chemicals in your makeup that can damage your skin. Not to mention your skin is exposed to dirt, pollution, and germs throughout the day. Imagine all of those things collecting on your pillows as you sleep. If you think that’s gross, then why are you leaving those things on your face? At night, the skin needs oxygen to repair the damage done throughout the day. With your pores clogged, your skin can’t go through its natural exfoliation.

Also, our eyes start showing age the earliest because the skin around them is the thinnest. Going to bed with your makeup on dries the skin around your eyes out and weakens the hairs in your eyebrows and eyelashes, causing them to thin and fall out. Remember—it’s a lot easier to remove your makeup and wash your face than it is to undo aging and regrow your eyebrows and eyelashes.

Mattie Knihal

January 25, 2013 by

Mattie Knihal, 30, says she always loved to play with hair when she was little. “I’ve known since I was 7 years old that I would do hair,” she says. “Whenever anyone came over to our house, they would get a ‘Mattie Hair-Do.’”

Knihal, the oldest of three children, was born and raised in Omaha. She graduated from Millard North High School in 2001 and immediately went to Capitol School of Hairstyling, from which she graduated in 2002. Shortly thereafter, she started with Gloss Salon & Day Spa where she has been for ten years.

During her time as a stylist, Knihal has become a Redken Certified Colorist, which means she has been recognized for her expertise and commitment in Redken hair color and hair care products. She has also been recognized in both the 2012 and 2013 Best of Omaha™ contests in the Hair Colorist category.

“I want clients to look at me and think, ‘She cares about her appearance, and I want her to make me look good.’”

She believes her clientele—which includes KETV’s Brandi Petersen—keep her on her toes. “[They] all like to look and feel their best when they leave my chair,” she says. “Some like to change up what we do every time to keep it new and exciting. Some like to stay with what works best for them.” She adds that she prefers to be upfront with her clientele and tell them what will and won’t work for them based on their face shape, lifestyle, and time they want to spend on their hair.

Knihal, who has two daughters, Emma and Elaina, with husband Ryan, describes her own personal style as clean and professional. “I want clients to look at me and think, ‘She cares about her appearance, and I want her to make me look good’…I’m simple in the fact that I think black is the best color. It goes with anything and looks great when paired with the right accessories.”

Her favorite styling products and tools include:

  • Redken’s Color Extend Shampoo and Conditioner—“The shampoo provides color retention and anti-fade protection while maximizing color vibrancy and strength. The conditioner allows for great detangling and smooth conditioning without weighing the hair down.”
  • Redken’s Guts 10 Volume Spray—“It lifts up the roots of your hair to provide all-over volume. It allows for a lasting flexible feel and look.”
  • Redken’s Align 12 Protective Strengthening Lotion—“It has anti-frizz technology and heat protection. It allows for a naturally straight look.”

Choose the Right Shadow for Your Eyes

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

It’s common to get stuck wearing the same eyeshadow color for months, if not years. Sure, it’s intimidating to venture into a realm of new colors when you’re not even sure if those new colors will work well with your complexion or your eye color—but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try to find a new color that really makes your peepers pop. Whether you have brown or blue, green or hazel, there is a perfect set of complementary colors for your eyes that you should definitely try.

Brown Eyes. Most women with brown eyes complain about having brown eyes, but what they don’t realize is that they have a really versatile eye color. For best emphasis of the beautiful, deep brown, try greens, pinks, and grays. A soft green can bring out the dimensions of brown eyes while coral pinks can draw brown eyes away from their “muddy” state. Grays are often ignored because they’re thought to be bland, but the silver tones in grays can actually help intensify the chocolate and amber qualities in brown eyes.

Blue Eyes. One of the most common mistakes women with blue eyes make is that they wear blue eyeshadow, which actually draws attention away from the beauty of their eye color. The best colors are actually earth tones, like browns, taupes, and grays, because they are more neutral and make blue eyes seem more vibrant by comparison. For more fun-filled splashes of color, blue eyes will also look lively with a deep magenta or fuchsia.

Green Eyes. Green eyes are often mistaken for hazel because many women don’t know how to play up their unique eye color. Unlike hazel, green eyes require more dramatic colors to emphasize their hidden qualities. Eyeshadows with sunset undertones, like amber or copper, bring out the yellow subtleties in green eyes, as green and orange are complementary colors on the color wheel. Even more dramatic enhancements can be made with a plum or purple eyeshadow, which really makes green seem brighter.

Hazel Eyes. Since hazel is a blend of all of the other eye colors, hazel can get away with several different shadows, depending on which color is going to be the main accent. To emphasize more of the brown, go for greens, pinks, and grays; to emphasize more of the blue, go for earth tones, like browns and grays; to emphasize more of the green, go for coppers and purples. The other option, of course, is to showcase all of these colors at once with a combination of browns and forest green shadows.