Tag Archives: Lanoha Nurseries

Faces of Omaha 2018

April 19, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Faces of Omaha is an annual sponsored publication that introduces a variety of “faces,” local industry leaders and experts, to the community. This exclusive publication was carefully cultivated​,​ so only one person and company per business category is invited to participate.

In the publishing industry, this sort of publication is known as “native advertising.” Native advertising is a unique form of sponsored content produced by editorial staff in conjunction with advertisers. The end result is an enjoyable book that has value to both the readers and advertisers.

Everyone featured in the book is truly the “face” of their field. Our sales team spent considerable time cultivating this list.

The following pages introduce more than 100 people and companies, the leaders in their respective areas of expertise, who stand ready to serve their community.  

Todd Lemke, publisher Omaha Publications

This sponsored content was printed in a special annual. To view, click here: Faces of Omaha 2018

Chris Lanoha

April 6, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Locally owned by the Lanoha family, Lanoha Nurseries takes the time and energy to cultivate and grow the plants used in their landscape design, affording them the ability to provide landscaping that is largely Nebraska-grown and able to thrive here. 

The in-house design team consists of degreed landscape architects. This creative team still has the ability to do hand renderings—something that lends itself well to the creative process, yet is not a talent held by all landscape design companies. “We specialize in artscapes, water features, and making outside living spaces that intermingle landscape with extra qualities to make it all pop,” says owner Chris Lanoha. Backyard areas can be transformed into outdoor living spaces that are well-suited for entertaining or relaxing. Landscape design expertly done by Lanoha Nurseries can increase the value of a home. 

Lanoha Nurseries’ impressive selection of materials and plants and vast experience in running irrigation make even intricate landscape designs possible for both residential and commercial customers. It’s no wonder this award-winning landscape design center is a local favorite. 


Lanoha Nurseries
19111 West Center Road
402.289.4103
lanohanurseries.com

This sponsored content appeared in Faces of Omaha 2018. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/faces_2018/56

Planting Seeds for the (Chinese) New Year

March 1, 2018 by

Pick of the Week—Saturday, March 3: They say those born in the Year of the Dog possess the best traits of human nature—kindness, honesty, loyalty, etc. Celebrate all that goodness at the Nebraska Chinese Association’s Lunar New Year Gala this weekend. One of the largest annual celebrations of Asian culture in the Midwest, you do not want to miss out on this year’s celebration. Omaha Magazine will be there with our latest issue, marking our 35th year and featuring several stories on the history (and future) of Chinese people in Omaha. The gala showcases Chinese culture and heritage using cuisine, traditional performances, and of course, the lion dance. Let’s hope this new year brings out those good traits in all of us. Purchase your tickets to this festive yet educational event here, or you can pick them up at Asian Market on 76th Street in the Heritage Plaza.

Thursday, March 1: Start talking, and listening, tonight at Me Too: A Community Dialogue about Coercion and Consent at Urban Abbey. This is a community conversation regarding sexual violence and how we can do better. The #MeToo movement serves as a catalyst to discussion regarding coercion, consent, and change. Hosted by the Women’s Center for Advancement, The Women’s Fund of Greater Omaha, and Urban Abbey, this event is open to everyone. Find out more here.

Friday, March 2: Kick off this beautiful weekend with some sweet live music at Slowdown at 8 p.m. Kait Berreckman is leaving her new home in Denver and bringing it back to Omaha, She’ll be killing it Friday night with Edge of Arbor and Miwi La Lupa. Support your favorite local (and formerly local) acts now. Tickets are only $7, so this is a don’t-miss-it show. Better get your tickets here.

Friday, March 2 and Saturday, March 3: Get out and enjoy the promised (fingers crossed) good weather this weekend during the Historic Preservation Conference and Exhibition, courtesy of Restoration Exchange Omaha. There will be speakers, building tours, walking tours, and even some free food and drinks. See the up-and-coming areas around Omaha and talk to the people making it all happen. For the complete schedule of events, go here.

Sunday, March 4: Have you been thinking about sprucing up your yard, but aren’t sure where to start? Worried that you have more of a black thumb than a green one? Then get to Starting Seeds: An Informative Discussion and Hands-on Workshop at Lanoha Nurseries. The informative discussion starts at 1 p.m. and will cover everything from picking the perfect seed to transplanting that grownup seed. There’s also a hands-on workshop you can sign up for, though that part isn’t free. Learn more here.

Sunday, March 4: There are only two shows remaining in the Omaha Symphony’s Family Series, and this next one promises a little mystery for your Sunday afternoon. Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Missing Music is playing out at the Holland Performing Arts Center at 2 p.m. Everyone is a suspect in the case of the orchestra’s missing melody, so you’d better have a solid alibi. Watch Holmes investigate to Gershwin, Shostakovich, and, fittingly, Mancini’s “The Pink Panther Theme.” Get your tickets to this mystery adventure here.
Or, take your chances and visit Omaha Magazine’s Facebook page (@omahamagazine) to learn more out more about winning free tickets to Omaha Symphony performances of Sherlock Holmes: Case of the Missing Music and Symphony in Space.

Be Our Guest

August 27, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

“They tell me, it’s up to you to change things out. We trust you.” Alex Ostblom, a landscape designer for Lanoha Nurseries, strolls across a newly transformed Westside lawn, naming flowers off the top of his head. Impatiens, begonias, mandevilla, and sweet alyssum are planted in great swaths of color, sweeping along sidewalk, driveway, and around to a brand-new back yard. Guests to the remodeled home might never suspect what the place looked like just a few months earlier.

Ostblom explains that the homeowners wanted a lawn that matched their refinished house’s new capabilities: to blend in with the rest of the stately neighborhood and to provide a perfect space to entertain family members and close friends. “Other than that,” he says, “they didn’t have too many particulars.” So Ostblom let his creativity loose, beginning the design process in March and construction in May. The entire project was completed by June 15.

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The first order of business was to redesign an unsightly retaining wall that led around the north of the house to the back yard. Originally made of concrete block, the five-foot wall created a tight alley between the house and a small mountain of unusable back yard. Its considerable height so close to the back of the house blocked off half of the dining and living room windows. A cramped patio made a stab at bringing hospitality to the space.

To simultaneously create a much less imposing wall while also making the yard itself usable, Ostblom removed tons of dirt to create tiers of lawn that allowed him to install a limestone wall less than two feet tall. The limestone complements colors in the house and can actually be found in the landscaping of nearby homes, bringing the property more into the neighborhood’s fold. Large blocks of the limestone accent the front and back yard, “giving the grandkids something to climb around on,” Ostblom points out.

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Thanks to the greatly shortened wall, guests in the dining and living rooms can enjoy a panorama of seasonal annuals (“One of the owners just loves lots of color,” Ostblom says), a rose cutting garden, and mature evergreens. “They wanted everything to look like it’d been there for years,” Ostblom says, so Lanoha Nurseries set field-grown spruce and conifers in place with machinery. “That’s a one-time deal,” he explains. “If the trees don’t take to this well, we can’t get the equipment back in here to put in more of that size.” So he’s monitoring their progress closely, already eyeing some barely noticeable brown needles on a spruce. “That one might be under stress from over watering.”

Frequent entertainment of friends and family meant the homeowners needed a large, welcoming space. In particular, they wanted a gas fire pit large enough where several people could comfortably gather. The idea of an L-shaped outdoor kitchen was tossed around, but the couple decided instead to place a simple grill out of sight around the home’s south corner to ensure that the fire pit remained their outdoor gathering place. A gas line leads from the house to the grill; no empty propane cans here.

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Ostblom notes that establishing such a mature landscape within six weeks calls for careful attention to how light will change over the seasons. Most of the yard is in at least partial shade, particularly in the front yard and to the north. To the northeast and east, the yard transitions into full sun. To cope with the variety of landscape elements (varying light, drainage, and plants with differing needs), Ostblom says he redesigned the home’s irrigation entirely. “They have turf, trees, annuals…it all requires different watering.” To facilitate easy maintenance by Lanoha Nurseries without disturbing the homeowners, Ostblom had the irrigation clock moved from inside the garage to just inside the gate in the backyard.

“I visit about once a month,” he says, though he admits he makes the rounds in the neighborhood frequently, checking in on this and other landscaping projects for any signs of trouble. “Communication. That’s the biggest part in making sure it all looks amazing.”

It’s Not Too Late to Water!

December 25, 2012 by

Omaha’s thousands of trees are in danger. This summer’s unprecedented heat and drought have put even mature, established trees in peril. Trees cannot endure a period of extended drought without help. If trees are not rehydrated soon, they will not be able to survive the winter, let alone fight off insects and disease next year. If the Ash Borer reaches Omaha, our ash trees may be unable to take up the nutrients they need to fight the insects.

As early as August, many trees in Omaha began “shutting down” in an attempt to conserve water. When this happens, growth ceases and plants prematurely lose their leaves. Trees already have next year’s buds. The drought not only affected last year’s tree quality, but has the potential to significantly affect trees’ appearance this year. This drought is unprecedented to our generation. Most trees have not experienced summer conditions like this before.

There’s still time to save Omaha’s trees. It’s important that tree owners take the initiative to water trees. It’s a misconception that large trees have roots deep enough to get to underground water. The majority of feeder roots are actually in the top 12-16” of soil. Established trees (5 years and older) are best watered with soaker- or drip-irrigation hoses. A regular hose running at a trickle is much less effective, as the water often runs beyond the target zone and pools in unhelpful areas.

Water should not be targeted against the trunk of the tree. Tree trunks can become subject to disease and insect problems if moisture is concentrated next to the trunk. A tree’s “root zone” actually spreads 2 to 3 times wider than the tree’s canopy. Water must be applied directly to this target area. Watering for short bursts can lead to additional drought damage. Shallow watering forces oxygen out of the soil and results in oxygen starvation of a tree’s roots. What our trees need now is consistent, deep watering.

Trees need 10 gallons of water for every inch of diameter of trunk, measured 2 feet up the trunk of the tree. For example, a 7-inch diameter tree requires 70 gallons of water in each section of the root system covered by the soaker hose or stationary sprinkler. A hose open at half pressures takes five minutes to produce 10 gallons of water. Therefore, each section of a 7-inch diameter tree’s root zone must be watered for 35 minutes. It may take several days of watering to cover the entire root zone.

If there’s no rainfall, trees should be watered once a week during the growing season, continuing on a regular basis until rain returns. The arrival of winter does not mean it’s time to stop watering. Winter drought can affect both evergreen and young hardwood trees. Water once or twice per month between October and March on warm days as long as the ground is not frozen.

The best time to water is at night between 9pm and 8am, as trees refill water reserves during the night hours. Watering at night allows for effective use of water with less loss from evaporation. This assures that more water moves into the soil and tree. The second-best time to water is late afternoon.

The best way of knowing if you’re getting water deep enough into the soil is to use a screwdriver. It should glide through the soil in the area you just watered to the depth of at least 8-10 inches with little or no resistance. Don’t be surprised if you hit concrete-like soil about 3-4 inches down. Water in shortened sessions until able to get water to penetrate. Don’t be surprised to find the soil almost repelling the water until sufficiently hydrated.

Younger trees require a similar approach for watering, but the root area is much less. A tree needs about one year per inch of trunk at planting time to establish a root system. It’s very easy to overwater the soil surrounding a newly installed tree. The root mass and a few inches beyond are critical areas during the tree’s establishment period. Every year, roots expand into the surrounding soil, creating a wider area to be hydrated in dry periods.

Here at Lanoha Nurseries, we are happy to answer questions and walk tree owners through the watering process. We care about all trees and want to ensure that Omaha’s trees stay safe and healthy.

Call to speak with a Lanoha professional at 402-289-4103 or stop in the Garden Center at 192nd and West Center Road.