Tag Archives: Great Plains Black History Museum

July/August 2018 Exhibits Calendar

June 19, 2018 by and

Art & Museum Exhibits

Patriotic Perches
Through July 15 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This collection of 51 handcrafted birdhouses by Richard Yost will educate visitors about state birds and flowers. Admission: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, free for children under 6 and members. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African-American Experiences in World War II
Through July 15 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This exhibit highlights some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African-Americans during World War II. Also showing at this time is American Adventure, which closes July 29. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $7 children (3-12), free to children age 2 and under and members. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org

Amy Haney
Through July 17 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnam St. An Omaha native, Haney is sharing her printmaking pieces. Admission: free. 402-595-2122.
artscouncil.nebraska.gov

Another Bloomin’ Exhibit by Omaha Artists, Inc.
Through July 23 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. The botanical artwork of many local artists will depict flowers, landscapes and more through a variety of media. Admission: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, free for children under 6 and members. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Our Body: The Universe Within
Through July 31 at The Capitol District, 225 N. 12th St., Suite 120. Guests will be able to connect with human artifacts on a personal level. Admission: $15 adults, $10 children (5-14), $12 seniors (65+), active military members, and students (15+ with ID). 531-444-0423.
ourbodyomaha.com

Marcela Diaz: Contemporary Textiles
Through Aug. 18 at El Museo Latino, 4701 S. 25th St. This exhibit represents the traditional textile fiber art of the Yucatán region. Admission: $5 adults, $4 college students with ID, $3.50 students K-12 and seniors (55+), and free to children under 5, military members with ID, and museum members. 402-731-1137.
elmuseolatino.org

Sincerely, Mark Teague
Through Aug. 19 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. A showcase of original art from author and illustrator Mark Teague and his How Do Dinosaurs series, the LaRue stories, and more. Admission: free. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

Children’s China: Celebrating Culture, Character, and Confucius
Through Aug. 19 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St. Become a researcher at a panda reserve, cook a traditional Chinese meal, play games, explore the language, and become a dragon in a festival parade. Another exhibit on display at this time is Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secrets of the Sewer. Admission: $13 adults and kids, $12 seniors (60+), free for children under 2 and members. 402-342-6164.
ocm.org

A Night at the Dreamland Ballroom
Through Sept. 1 at Great Plains Black History Museum, 2221 N. 24th St. Dreamland Ballroom held some of the greatest jazz acts from its heydays in the 1930s until it closed in 1965. This exhibit will highlight photos and artifacts from this era. Admission: free. 402-932-7077.
gpblackhistorymuseum.org

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection
Through Sept. 9 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Take a look at 50 masterworks from one of the most private collections of British painting in the U.S. Tickets: $10 general public ($5 on Thursday 4-8 p.m.), $5 college students, free for Joslyn members and ages 17 and younger. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org   

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection. Through Sept. 9

Sheila Pepe: Hot Mess Formalism
Through Sept. 15 at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, 724 S. 12th St. This exhibit examines how Pepe often plays with feminist and craft traditions to counter patriarchal notions of art. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Reality
Through Sept. 26 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. This exhibit investigates art, science, and technology that creates, alters, and reflects upon the sense of what’s real. Admission: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

Mike Godek, Susan Woodford, Kayley Slack, and Amelia Koneck
July 1 through July 22 at Hot Shops Art Center, 1301 Nicholas St. Sculptors Godek and Woodford, and painters Slack and Koneck, will display their art during July at Hot Shops. 402-342-6452.
hotshopsartcenter.com

Agneta Gaines, Joan Fetter, and Jenna Johnson
July 6-28 at the Artists’ Cooperative Gallery, 405 S. 11th St. Textile artist Gaines and painters Fetter and Johnson display their colorful works. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Ella Weber: Sounds Good
July 20-Aug. 25 at The Union for Contemporary Arts, 2423 N. 24th St. This Omaha artist examines the connections between consumerism, sexuality, spirituality, and the mundane through her suburban Midwestern ethos. Admission: free. 402-933-3161.
u-ca.org

Taking Root
Starting July 26 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. Artist Kristine Allphin shows art that is full of color, texture, and the beauty of nature. Admission: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, free for children under 6 and members. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.com

Betni Kalk
Starting July 27 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnam St. Encaustic painter and muralist Betni Kalk will show her works at the gallery. Encaustic painting is also known as hot wax painting, using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. Admission: free. 402-595-2122.
artscouncil.nebraska.gov

Nicki Byrum, Margie Schementi, Inna Kulagina, and Charleen Potter
Aug. 3-31 at the Artists Cooperative Gallery, 405 S. 11th St. The Co-op’s August show features something for everyone, with paintings, mixed-media works, textiles, and ceramics. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Fighting for the Good Life: Nebraskans’ Memories of World War I.
Starting Aug. 18 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I by highlighting its impact on those in Omaha and the surrounding region. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $7 children (3-12), and free to children age 2 and under and members. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org 


Event times and details may change.
Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

May/June 2018 Exhibits Calendar

April 27, 2018 by
Photography by provided

Art & Museum Exhibits

BFA & BASA Thesis and Senior Shows
Through May 5 at UNO Criss Library and Weber Art Gallery, 6001 Dodge St. Thesis students in the art gallery and BASA graduating seniors from UNO showcase their work. Admission: free. 402-554-3206.
unomaha.edu

Word/Play: Prints, Photographs, and Paintings by Ed Ruscha
Through May 6 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. The first major exhibition featuring Ruscha in his home state of Nebraska, Word/Play brings together prints, photographs, and artist books, complemented by a selection of major paintings. Ruscha’s use of the written word is a signature element of his work. Tickets: $10 ($5 from 4-8 p.m. Thursdays), $5 students with valid ID, free to members and youths 17 and under. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

Metamorphosis: Works by Sayaka Ganz and Aurora Robson
Through May 13 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This exhibit is constructed of found, recycled, and reused plastic objects. Equal parts artistic and educational, it will feature fine art accompanied by a message of environmental stewardship. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

beginning.break.rapid: Kenji Fujita & Barbara Takenaga
Through June 2 at Bemis Center, 742 S. 12th St. These artists use a variety of mediums including vinyl, paint, spray paint, gesso, paper, calcium carbonate, wood, plywood, and linen. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying
Through June 2 at Bemis Center, 742 S. 12th St. The artists in this exhibit examine how support for the body in states of illness and rest prompts us to re-imagine the world collectively. The exhibit aims to bring attention to how the body is articulated in capitalism and health-related discourse. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Widespread Flowering
Through June 4 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. Motivated by the beauty and passage of time, space, and geometry of the world of nature, Ann Brugenhemke explores life and love through art. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Wedes
Through June 4 at Darger HQ, 1804 Vinton St. Artists Angela Simione and Sarah Rowe are inspired by traditional craft. Their work embodies illustrations of everyday objects as metaphors of self-identity, boundaries, and protection. Admission: free. 402-209-5554.
dargerhq.org

Tuskeegee Airmen: Who Called Nebraska Home
Through June 30 at Great Plains Black History Museum, 2221 N. 24th St. (Jewell Building). The exhibit will highlight photos, historical information, and artifacts about the Tuskeegee Airmen who called Nebraska home. Admission: free. 402-932-5554
gpblackhistorymuseum.org

Wearable Art—Kiss of the Wolf
May 3-6 at Anderson O’Brien Art, 1108 Jackson St. Artist Lori Bacigalupi explores different techniques in fabric design, such as screen process, natural dyeing, and mono-printing in wearable art. Admission: free. 402-884-0911.
aobfineart.com

Awakening
Starting May 4 at Omaha Artists’ Co-op, 405 S. 11th St. Enjoy works of art by Jasmine Greenwaldt, Alan Smith, and George Skuodas. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Salon Time: Sonya Clark + Althea Murphy-Price + Nontsikelelo Mutiti
May 4-June 30 at The Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 North 24th St. Salon Time features three artists who examine and celebrate the ritual time and material culture surrounding black women’s hair care. Admission: free. 402-933-3161.
u-ca.org

Missouri Valley Impressionist Society
May 11-June 30 at Gallery 1516, 1516 Leavenworth St. This national juried exhibition features pieces from the Missouri Valley Impressionist Society, a painting group striving to bring impressionism throughout the Missouri River Valley Region. Admission: free. 402-305-1510.
gallery1516.org

Amy Haney
Starting May 25 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnman St. An Omaha native, Haney has practiced her artwork in several U.S. cities. Currently a professor in the college of communication, fine arts, and media at UNO, she is excited to share her printmaking pieces. Admission: free. 402-595-2122.
artscouncil.nebraska.gov

Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle: Secrets of the Sewer
Starting May 26 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St. Leap to the rescue and learn teamwork, collaboration, and problem-solving through puzzles, mazes, and obstacles just like Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Donatello. Also showing at this time is: Children’s China: Celebrating Culture, Character, and Confucius. Admission: $12 adults and kids, $11 seniors, free for children under 2 and members. 402-342-6164.
ocm.org

Reality
Starting June 1 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. Reality will dissect the notion of truth, history, and the presentation of what is “real.” This exhibit will investigate art, science, and technology that creates, alters, and reflects upon the sense of real. Admission: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

The Eye Perceives
Starting June 1 at Artists Co-op, 405 S. 11th St. View works by Richard Markoff, Gabriella Quiroz, and Duane Adams. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection
Starting June 2 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Take a look at 50 masterworks from one of the most private collections of British painting in the U.S. Tickets: $10 adults ($5 on Thursday 4-8 p.m.), $5 college students, free for Joslyn members and ages 17 and younger. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org   

Patriotic Perches
Starting June 20 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This exhibit features a collection of 51 handcrafted birdhouses by Richard Yost. Yost combines art, geography, and horticulture to educate visitors about state birds and flowers. Each birdhouse is decorated with knick-knacks that represent each state. Admission: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African-American Experiences in World War II
Through July 15 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This exhibit features artifacts, photographs, and oral histories to highlight some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African-Americans during World War II, both overseas and at home. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $7 children (3-12), and free to children age 2 and under and members. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org


Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

Beer and Learning in Omaha

February 15, 2018 by

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PICK OF THE WEEKSaturday, Feb. 17: Moving on from the hearts, candy, flowers, and cupids, let’s flip to something really fun—Haunticon Omaha at the Historical Union Stockyards. Take a  class, listen to some speakers, and decide for yourself what’s real. Don’t forget to get a reading done and try your hand at an escape room designed by Entrap Games. Find out all the secrets here.

Thursday, Feb. 15: If you’ve ever wanted to share a personal story with a crowd of (slightly tipsy) strangers, the Show & Tell StorySLAM at The Sydney is where you need to be tonight. Think The Moth (NPR) but with booze. This round the theme is “firsts.” Whether it’s your first love, first job, or first time getting drunk, write it down and share it with strangers and friends alike. To learn more, click here.

Friday, Feb. 15 to Sunday, Feb. 25: Had your fill of wine, champagne, and flirty red cocktails? Get back to basics during Omaha Beer Week. (OK, so technically a little more than a week, but who’s complaining?) A homebrew competition kicked things off on Monday, and tonight you have two potential stops—Infusion Brewing Co. and Liquid Sunshine Taproom. But things don’t really start hopping until tomorrow (Friday), with over 20 local businesses rolling out the barrels. Find the right fit for your palate here.

Friday, Feb. 16: It’s a weekend packed with unique, informative opportunities. Friday gets it going in a big way with “Calming Your Mind to Follow Your Heart” a special lecture from Golden Globe-nominated Native American actor Adam Beach (though he may be best recognized as Slipknot from Suicide Squad). This lecture is part of the third annual John Trudell Distinguished Lecture in Native American Studies, honoring Trudell, who was an actor, poet, and activist. Beach will speak on his own life experiences, including his activism and hope for the future of Indigenous people. The learning starts at 7:30, doors open at 7 p.m. While this special event is free, be sure to reserve seating here, as it will no doubt fill up quickly.

Saturday, Feb. 17: Geek out this Saturday at the Nebraska Robotics Expo at the Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum. Opening ceremonies start at 8:30 a.m. and this dynamic display of ingenuity lasts until 3:30 p.m. Watch local students compete and show off their robotics knowledge and creativity. There will be a CEENBoT Showcase, a Creative Visual Arts Expo, and a First LEGO League, which includes a Hydro Dynamics Challenge and experimentation with LEGO Mindstorms technology. Find out more about the event here.

Sunday, Feb. 18: Continue getting your education on this weekend at The Civil Rights Movement in Omaha workshop at the Great Plains Black History Museum. This free 90-minute workshop will cover the civil rights movement in Omaha and the city’s own struggle toward progress. This is a good opportunity for the family (middle school age and up) to learn together. Be sure to head to the new location at 2221 N. 24th St. in the Jewell Building. To find out more, click here.

The First Weekend of 2018

January 4, 2018 by

PICK OF THE WEEK: Thursday, Jan. 4: This week we’re giving you the chance to check out the Blackstone District’s members-only music club for free when you RSVP to our first party of the year. The Hi-Fi House is featured in our latest issue, which you can pick up at Omaha Magazine’s January/February Launch Party. The Venezuelan food truck, El Arepón, will be on hand to feed your after-work munchies, even offering some free appetizers. There will also be beer available from Farnam House Brewing Company to wash down those savory bites and music from Omaha jazz musician Ed Archibald. To find out more, click here. RSVP at Local Stubs here.

Friday, Jan. 5: Benson First Friday and Dipped in Soul join forces this Friday at The B Side of Benson Theatre with Dipped in Soul + BFF, an art exhibition and open mic. You’ll get the chance to hear poetry, spoken word, hip-hop, and more after you check out some art by Maggie Heusinkvelt and Stephen Kavanaugh. This family-friendly, open-to-the-public event starts at 6 p.m. and it’s free. Proceeds from the B Side bar will go to the Benson Theatre Project. Click here to find out more.

Friday, Jan. 5: Check out one of Omaha’s favorite local artist at the Art by Bird Williams opening reception happening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Great Plains Black History Museum. The exhibit highlights paintings of famous African-Americans as seen through Aaron Bird Williams’ eyes. Light hors d’ouevres will be available and the artist will be on hand to discuss the exhibit, which is on display from Jan. 4 until Feb. 24. This is the perfect chance to check out the museum and buy some beautiful local art. Find out where to go here.

Saturday, Jan. 6: Been pining away, missing Bowie and all his fabulousness since he left this earth? Bennie Does Bowie III at The Waiting Room is here to help you fill that void. It’s the third annual tribute to the godfather of glam, when Bennie and the Gents pay homage to Ziggy Stardust, playing all the glittery tunes you long to hear. The Beat Seekers will add their own brand of fab by adding their resistance-rock sound to the show. Get your tickets here now.

 

Saturday, Jan. 6: Head to the Barley St. Tavern this Saturday if you’re feeling the need to hear some one-of-a-kind music from some kickass women (and a couple men). Sissy Brown, Virginia Kathryn, and Tragic Martha will be playing everything from British folk-rock to honky-tonk. Sissy Brown hails from Oklahoma and Texas, and knows how to throw down at a hoedown. Virginia Kathryn is a local, OEAA-nominated blues musician from right here in Omaha. (Check her out in the upcoming issue of Encounter.) And Tragic Martha hails from small-town Hyannis, Nebraska, where they play whatever they feel like playing. Find out more here.

 

Sunday, Jan. 7: Does all the technical jargon associated with space exploration make you balk at trying to learn more about it? If so, Jay Gallentine’s Ambassadors from Earth should be your next read, followed by his latest, Infinity Beckoned. You can meet him at the reading and signing of his latest work at Barnes & Noble (you know, one of those old-school box bookstores) by Oakview. Gallentine’s very special skill set is that he strips away all that confusing tech speak and tells the human side of the story of space exploration. Learn more here.

Clarence Wigington

December 15, 2016 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

When she lived a block away, Linda Williams would pass the Broomfield duplex at 25th and Lake streets almost every day. That was a little more than a decade ago.

As she walked past the duplex, she remembers thinking, “There is something interesting about that building…something I really like.” She liked the diamond shapes inside the top border, the hints of classical style in the columns in the front, as well as the rhythm and symmetry in the arched windows.

She did not know what made the building so special until a 2002 trip to the Great Plains Black History Museum.

clarencewigington2It turned out that the Broomfield duplex, built in 1913, was indeed special. In 1909, it won first prize for “best two-family brick dwelling” in a national competition sponsored by Good Housekeeping magazine. The duplex’s 2502-2504 Lake St. address was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, too.

But what made it particularly significant was that it was one of many residential structures in the area designed by Nebraska’s first African-American architect and also the nation’s first African-American municipal architect—Clarence W. “Cap” Wigington.

Williams was shocked. She had a Bachelor of Science in design from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of Architecture, and this was the first time she had ever heard about Wigington.

“I thought, ‘If I’m educated and I don’t know about him, there are a lot of other people who don’t know about him,’” Williams says. “So ever since then, I’ve been spreading the word about him.”

Williams, who works in the architecture field, has spent the last several years working to shine light onto Wigington’s work. She has presented seminars about Wigington for the Douglas County Historical Society and currently leads Restoration Exchange Omaha’s North 24th Street Walking Tour, which highlights three of Wigington’s significant Omaha buildings.

Wigington was born in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1883 and his family moved to Omaha shortly thereafter. Wigington graduated from Central High School (then Omaha High School) at age 15 and worked for the prominent Nebraska architect Thomas Kimball for six years before opening his own office. While he was in Omaha, he designed almost a dozen homes by independent commission, mostly in his North Omaha neighborhood. In 1914, he and his family moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he served as a senior designer for the City of St. Paul for 34 years. He designed several municipal buildings as well as monumental ice palaces for the St. Paul Winter Carnival in the 1930s and 1940s. He passed away in Kansas City in 1967 at age 84.

While Williams highlights several structures on her 24th Street tour, including Kimball’s Black History Museum and the Jewel Building (designed by F.A. Henninger), she spends a significant amount of time and effort explaining the three buildings on the route by Wigington.

She talks about the Broomfield duplex and the fact that it was actually one of two identical duplexes on the corner designed by Wigington. The second, called the Crutchfield duplex, was destroyed by a fire in the 1980s. Williams talks about Zion Baptist Church at 2215 Grant St., another structure on the National Register with big classical columns, original stained glass windows, and a cornerstone with Wigington’s name. And she talks about the prairie style and craftsman elements of St. John’s African Methodist Episcopal Church at 617 N. 18th St., which Wigington helped remodel.

“I thought, ‘If I’m educated and I don’t know about him, there are a lot of other people who don’t know about him. So ever since then, I’ve been spreading the word about him.”  -Linda Williams

Williams’ dedication has so far caught the attention of architecture and preservation aficionados in Omaha and nationwide. In 2015, she won a diversity scholarship through Historic New England and she was recently named a Diversity Scholar by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Another recent honor was particularly significant to Williams, even though it was not even for her. In October, the Central High Alumni Association inducted Wigington into their hall of fame. Since no one from Wigington’s family was able to accept the award, Williams was asked to accept on their behalf. Williams plans to deliver the award to the family, who live in Chicago, this year.

It was a humbling honor to accept the award and a humbling duty to continue sharing Wigington’s legacy with everyone who will listen. She says it is important for people to know not only what he did, but that he accomplished so much during a time in history when black men faced significant challenges.

“When you think about that particular time and era, there was Jim Crowism going on,” says Ethel Mitchell, current owner of the Broomfield duplex. “To have this black man do what he did and design this type of building was just unheard of. It’s hard to put words to that—it’s just outstanding.”

Visit restorationexchange.org/events/walking-tours to learn more.

clarencewigington1

Back from the Grave

June 29, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Sitting in a quiet space in a now very quiet Crossroads Mall, the Great Plains Black History Museum is currently a bit underwhelming.

It is a pleasing space, but sparse. As part of the current exhibit, the walls are lined with skillful pencil drawings of some of the greatest African-American figures of the last century. But, one longs for more than drawings.

Take a step back, though. Consider where the Museum has been. Closed down for a decade. Artifacts unseen, in disarray and, in some cases, moldering. And consider where the museum is going. Plans are taking shape for a new $15.5 million facility, The Great Plains Black History Museum, Science & Technology Center, that will not only include display space for the museum’s collection, but also ample state-of-the-art exhibits, labs, and classrooms for the area’s high school science and technology scholars.

For now, the Crossroads location is a place-holder of sorts, says the chairman of the museum board and architect of the museum’s rebirth, Jim Beatty. “We’re building energy here. This is a step in a process that’s heading to a very exciting place,” he says.

On a recent weekday afternoon, only one person perused the collection of portraits by local artist Terry Diel. That one guest, though, carries an excitement present in a much broader audience in this city. Darrell Sterling, who works nearby in Crossroads, grew up in North Omaha. He says he knows the energy is there for the museum to “become something great.”

“I went to the old museum down on Lake (Street) in grade school,” Sterling says. “It was a meaningful experience and honestly, there wasn’t even much there. I’m thrilled the museum is back, that it’s growing. It should be, it deserves to be. This city needs it. It’s important to the community.”

“For a city the size of Omaha to not have a black history museum, it’s embarrassing,” Beatty says. “It’s long overdue.”

Volunteers are in the process of cataloging and securing the current artifacts, some of which have been in danger of decay sitting in the leaky old museum structure. Other parts of the collection languished in a storage locker. “The collection is safe,” Beatty says. “Now it’s time for it to grow.”

As fundraising-raising efforts expand (which even includes efforts by state Sen. Rick Kolowski to generate up to $8 million in matching state funds for the project), the Crossroads site will continue to bring in quality exhibits. Next up—just in time for the College World Series—will be a collection of artifacts and interpretive pieces from the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City. The exhibit will include photos and other items from the Omaha museum’s own collection, including photos of the city’s early African-American men’s and women’s baseball teams.

Board member Terri Sanders, who, on a recent day, was the lone greeter/de-facto curator at the Crossroad location, says that she, like Beatty, sees the current quiet times as temporary. “Part of the process,” she says.

“We’re thrilled to be where we are,” she says. “We have a nice place that people can come into, see what’s happening, and hopefully get involved and be a part of this big leap forward.”

How big? The new facility is slated to have 14 full-time employees. That’s 14 times more than the common current staffing level of one.

“It’s a little quiet sometimes right now,” she says. “That won’t be true in the future.”

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