Tag Archives: From the Editor

Design is a Team Effort

May 16, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

How many magazines (outside of this one) do you read? I walk into the bookstore about once a month and look at the magazine racks. I’ve always enjoyed looking at the magazine section, and while certain magazines routinely grab my attention, new ones catch me each month by their
cover designs. 

It is thanks to graphic artists that readers stop in their tracks and pick up a magazine, but even a simplistic-looking cover is far from that—in some cases, the simpler the cover, the harder to design.

The cover you are viewing was created by senior graphic designer Derek Joy. He and I work closely on B2B—and I enjoy looking at how he inserts his colorful personality into the magazine.

His work is often subtle. He came up with a great design element a couple of months ago—a diamond-shaped graphic that is placed near the page numbers and explains the department in a creative way, such as the crescent moon in the diamond on “After Hours.” And take another look at last year’s Best of B2B results in the March/April/May 2017 edition (visit readonlinenow.com to see the issue). That launching rocket ship you find throughout the list was due to Derek’s creativity.

I also work with several other incredible artists. Creative director Matt Wieczorek’s appreciation of clean styles inspired the geometric, art-deco look for the annual Faces of Omaha, and graphic designer Mady Besch brought an element of surprise to the latest Family Guide with a cover made from felt, photographed by Bill Sitzmann. And Katiuska Nuñez produces stunning custom ads for
our advertisers.

I hope you enjoy reading about the design-inspired articles in this issue. 


This letter was printed in the June/July 2018 edition of B2B.

Daisy Hutzell-Rodman is the managing editor of B2B, a publication of Omaha Magazine LTD. She can be reached at daisy@omahamagazine.com.

Art, Travel, and Adventure

April 25, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Like any good book (or, ahem, magazine), art has the power to transcend space and time.
Artworks have been transporting viewers to far-off places and eras since the earliest days of cave paintings, through the Renaissance masters, and into the present.

The new issue of Omaha Magazine also aspires to take readers on exciting journeys from the comfort of wherever they may be reading.

A travel/adventure theme carries throughout the main feature well of the magazine’s city* edition.

Story subjects include a local family of skydivers, the postmodern Oregon Trail, and Nebraska’s “Beermuda Triangle” (by bicycle), along with adventure-seeker profiles ranging from a scuba-diving quadriplegic to a tractor puller and more.

With adventure and travel in mind, we thought it would be appropriate to partner with Joslyn Art Museum for a magazine launch party that connects the articles in our (non-themed) A+C and Dining departments with the rest of the city edition’s adventure/travel stories.

We scheduled the issue’s magazine launch (Monday, April 30) to correspond with the final week of Word/Play, Joslyn’s exhibition of Ed Ruscha’s artwork. Ruscha was born in Omaha, and this issue of Omaha Magazine features his profile.

With so much other great art in the permanent collection of Joslyn, we could not pass this opportunity to connect the new issue’s launch with the museum’s abundant collection of adventure/travel-inspired artworks.

Joslyn staff came up with a list of 10 fun scavenger hunt questions that not only touch upon themes of travel and adventure, but also require actual exploring of the museum to come up with answers.

“Remember that general admission to Joslyn Art Museum is always free!” says Amy Rummel, director of marketing and public relations at Joslyn. “All of the answers can be found in our permanent collection galleries, so come hunt during any of our regular public hours at no cost.”

The first three people who successfully complete the scavenger hunt (posted to the website surveymonkey.com) will receive prizes provided by Omaha Magazine advertisers.

*Note: the hotel edition of Omaha Magazine has a different cover, and it does not include all of the editorial content included in the magazine’s full city edition.

May/June Magazine Launch Party

Although Joslyn is normally closed on Mondays, the museum is opening specially for Omaha Magazine’s May/June launch party. Joslyn’s Memorial Building galleries will remain closed for the event and will reopen during normal museum hours.

Featuring: Free hot dogs, musical performances (including one by Miwi La Lupa, profiled in this issue), admission to Joslyn’s Pavilion galleries of modern and contemporary art, and free admission to the ticketed exhibition Word/Play: Prints, Photographs, and Paintings by Ed Ruscha (normally $10 for adults).

Admission: Free
Where: Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.
When: Monday, April 30 (5-7 p.m.)
RSVP: localstubs.com

Joslyn Museum Scavenger Hunt Questions

  1. Horses are a great way to navigate difficult terrain. Travel to the gallery featuring Asian art. How many horses are depicted in that gallery?
  2. Although not boots, the four items in this case were made for walkin’. Which two distinct types of footwear—one traditional, one modern—are shown together in the case? [Hint: the work of Native American artists]
  3. This contemporary Native American work depicts three modes of transportation in one sculpture. What are they?
  4. Sometimes travel is plagued by stormy weather. What is the title of the painting in Joslyn’s permanent collection that depicts such a situation, specifically at the conclusion of a trip featuring illegal activity? [Hint: European]
  5. To paint one of the works displayed in Joslyn’s permanent collection galleries, French Impressionist artist Claude Monet traveled to a coastal Italian village. What was this village called?
  6. A canoe is a means of adventurous water travel. How many canoes are pictured in Joslyn’s permanent collection galleries? [Hint: Art of the American West galleries 7–9]
  7. Many a family travel adventure ends at this awe-inspiring geological site. What is it, and who painted it? [Hint: an artist-explorer of the American West]
  8. Two men find themselves traveling through one of America’s most iconic intersections/entertainment districts/destinations. Name it.
  9. The crew of the Starship Enterprise spent much of their time traveling here. Name the work and the artist. [Hint: this painter was no drip]
  10. A common form of transportation that settlers used to go west was the covered wagon. How many family members are riding in Joslyn’s large covered wagon? [Hint: venture outdoors]

BONUS: Joslyn is home to a world-renowned collection of work by a young Swiss artist who traveled the upper Missouri with a German explorer. Name this duo.


This article was printed in the May/June 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Doug Meigs is the executive editor of Omaha Publications.

From the Editor

March 16, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

I recently picked up the book The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler. It is a book that starts at Boy Scout camp in the 1960s and follows the longtime friendship of two men who meet as boys at camp.

I’m excited to start this book because it combines a couple of my joys in life. This summer, like every summer, I plan to spend several days in the woods camping with my husband and our group of fellow Volkswagen Bus owners. This magazine features the camping adventures of a school counselor, a family of Scouts, and more. The guide in this edition showcases a wide variety of summer camps in the area.

Reading is another of my favorite pastimes, and it’s a great activity for summer. One of my fondest memories is that of my mother taking my sister and me to the public library in our small town to participate in the summer reading program. Each summer, the event included puppet shows, arts and crafts, and lots of reading. The summer before I started third grade, I won third place for the number of pages read, which meant a reporter snapped my picture for the weekly newspaper and I received a goodie bag full of prizes.

The best way for parents to encourage their students to read is to read themselves. Why not put away the electronics for an hour before bed each night as a family and read a book? When people ask me, “Wow, how do you manage to read 12 books a year?” I tell them that I digital detox each night before I go to bed. Another idea might be to encourage kids to read during the heat of the afternoon when one needs to find a cool spot and escape.

Whether your summer is filled with camping, reading, or other adventures, I wish you and your family a fantastic school break.


This letter was originally printed in the Spring/Summer 2018 edition of Family Guide.

Daisy Hutzell-Rodman is the managing editor of Family Guide, a publication of Omaha Magazine LTD. She can be reached at daisy@omahamagazine.com.

Entryway

February 23, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Spring has officially sprung, and I am itching to spruce things up around my house—inside and out.

In other words, spring cleaning. Washing the windows is typically the first item on the list, but this is not as fun as changing my throw pillows or creating floral arrangements to add something more colorful and lighter to coordinate with the new season. Combining succulents with bold colors and metallics is a hot trend (and I’m planning to experiment with them at my own home). I also take the opportunity to weed through my closet and transition to my spring/summer wardrobe.

Normally I create a spring DIY project, but after my yearlong room makeover we decided to change things a bit and feature some new creative talent out there in our city. This issue spotlights a painting project by a professional artist whose love of Moroccan style helped turn an ordinary bookshelf into a portal of sorts.

Omaha architect Steve Ginn spent five years designing a picturesque woodland masterpiece situated on 20 acres in Tennessee. If you love nature and being surrounded by it in almost every sense, you will love this tranquil home.

Does mixing old and new styles ever get old? The Nabitys would say no, as that is exactly their style—rustic elegance. It turns out you don’t have to live at Cape Cod to get the look and feel of being there, minus the ocean.  Hopefully some of these homes or projects will inspire warm weather decorating ideas of your own.

I enjoy that spring is also the beginning of yard sale season. It’s a great way to pick up some great bargains for new weekend projects on a budget.

If you have something you just have to share with the rest of us DIYers, email me at sandy@omahapublications.com. I love to hear from fellow decorators and creatives. 

This article was printed in the March/April 2018 edition of OmahaHome.

Sandy Matson is the contributing editor for Omaha Home.

Entrepreneurial Spirit

January 19, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

My grandparents owned a small grocery business in central Iowa—Shinn’s By-Lo Foods. The business was started by my great-grandparents and sold before I was born. What I know of it is stories gleaned from my mother and her sisters—stories of them spending time at my great-grandparents’ home while my grandparents were working, stories of food that came home from the store to be used for dinner because it was time for it to be off the shelves. These stories were often told as the family used plastic coins bearing the company name that were issued as food stamps, left over from the business, as poker chips during games of Michigan rummy.

Their entrepreneurship has become central to the American Dream narrative realized by subsequent generations of our family (myself included).

Merriam-Webster defines the American Dream as the ideal that every U.S. citizen should have an equal opportunity to achieve success and prosperity through hard work, determination, and initiative. Many people consider a part of this dream owning a business.

The February/March edition of B2B is devoted to those whose entrepreneurial spirit is propelling them forward into their version of the American Dream. I myself smiled when reading about cousins Muhib Hassan and Niamatullah Habibzai, who came to the U.S. in pursuit of the American Dream and have been able to purchase their own grocery store. Omaha boasts several great entrepreneurs in this issue. I hope you enjoy reading about all of them.

Daisy Hutzell-Rodman is the managing editor of B2B, a publication of Omaha Magazine LTD. She can be reached at daisy@omahamagazine.com.

This column was printed in the February/March 2018 edition of B2B.

Healthy New Year’s Resolutions

December 22, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

New Year’s resolutions often involve health goals. I know mine do. Whether I follow through on the resolution is another story.

With health on our minds, our January/February issue focuses on the theme with several health-related articles and a guide to the best local nurses and doctors.

One article in the issue explores the breakthrough stroke technology that Dr. Vishal Jani has advanced with CHI Health’s Neurological Institute at Immanuel Medical Center; however, most of the latest edition’s health stories take a less medically focused approach.

Our profile of musician Ed Archibald tells the story of how the saxophonist grew up in Omaha’s vibrant jazz scene, only to get bogged down with the daily grind of his 9-to-5 before a work-related injury precipitated his experimentation with digital recording and a return to his jazz roots.

Our profile of “Dr. Donna” Polk, the chief executive officer of the Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition, tells her personal story. Polk is a cancer survivor. But the focus of the story pays attention to the nonprofit’s work with behavioral health, youth, and families of Native American people living in the Omaha metro. Polk is  trying to raise $7 million to make possible the coalition’s new facility in South Omaha.

Omaha’s Nurse of the Year Awards recognize the metro’s best nurses in several categories (including student nurses, specialty fields, Nurse of the Year nominees, and the individual “Nurse of the Year” winner). In addition to the region’s best nurses, the magazine also features Omaha’s “Best Doctors,” excerpted from a nationally produced list of the nation’s best doctors. These special listings have both appeared in Omaha Magazine over the years. But this year is the first time we have included both sections together in the same issue.

This issue is also the first time that OmahaHome will be printed separately from Omaha Magazine’s full city edition (rather than an overrun edition); however, subscribers and those who buy on newsstands will still find Omaha Magazine and OmahaHome bagged together. Likewise, in the spirit of the new year, this is the first issue we have tried consolidating our augmented reality capabilities into the table of contents page (rather than featuring scannable pages throughout the magazine). Scan the table of contents page with the LayAR application on a smartphone or tablet to enjoy digital bonus content that complements select articles.

We have a long-form article about elder abuse, which is focused on financial abuse. Of course, financial health is a form of health.

Meanwhile the entire 60PLUS section has turned into a 24-page fashion package that explores the styles and biographical details of local community influencers (age 60 and older) who are looking good and feeling great in the “prime time” of their lives.

Doug Meigs is the executive editor of Omaha Publications.

This letter was printed in the January/February 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Stork Deliveries and Publication Deadlines

August 27, 2017 by and
Photography by Provided

Around the time when our July/August “Food Issue” arrived in subscribers’ mailboxes, special deliveries from “the stork” arrived for the families of two Omaha Magazine staffers.

One of those families is my own. My wife and I became first-time parents with the birth of our baby girl, Faye-Marie.

The next week, an office-wide e-mail shared good news from a colleague in advertising. Omaha Magazine branding specialist Josh Peterson welcomed his third son into the world.

Because of our staggered editorial deadlines, these births coincided with the middle of production on this September/October issue.

Because Josh is a more experienced parent—and he had the audacity to hand-deliver the baby—we share his story here.


The Art of Baby Catching

story by Blair Emsick

Upon arriving at the hospital to give birth to their third child, Josh and Stephanie Peterson had two questions: Can we deliver standing up, and can Josh catch the baby?

The husband and wife had discussed these possibilities with their doctor previously, but she was out. The on-call doctor quickly responded, “No,” to both questions. Josh didn’t want to push (no pun intended), so he let it go. However, upon learning that Josh was an EMT and was interested in learning the skill (just in case he ever had to deliver a child in the back of an ambulance), the on-call doctor agreed to let him “catch” his child.

Experiences during the childbirth of their first two boys influenced Josh’s desire to catch baby boy No. 3.

Twenty-five hours into labor on baby No. 1, doctors realized that Andy was stuck and had to be delivered via C-section. Stephanie’s platelets were low, so she had to be anesthetized for the procedure. She was unconscious for the first few hours after the birth as well. Although Josh was the first to hold his baby, he missed those first special moments between mother, father, and baby.

Then with baby No. 2, Connor came six weeks early and had to be rushed to the NICU right after being born. Yet again, Josh and Stephanie missed that special post-birth cuddle with their newborn. Instead, they watched doctors insert an IV into their newborn’s head.

With their third, Josh and Stephanie wanted to do it right. “I thought, ‘Well, there is no way this can go worse than our past births,’” Josh says. He was right. When Stephanie went into labor, and after the doctor gave the go-ahead, Josh gowned and got into place.

“Now, I know what crowning really means,” Josh says with wide eyes, remembering the experience. Then, after what felt like a nanosecond, Rory was right there in his arms—alive, healthy, breathing, and crying. Josh quickly passed the baby to his wife, but that first moment, to be the first person to touch his newborn, is something he will never forget.

Mother, father, and baby were finally together—happy and healthy. It was just like they had imagined. Perhaps the third time really is the charm. Catching baby Rory, Josh says, was “the coolest thing I’ve ever done.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This letter was printed in the September/October 2017 edition of Omaha Magazine.