Tag Archives: experiment

Transitorily Yours

February 22, 2017 by
Photography by Amy Lynn Straub

Editor’s note: This is the first installment in a new Encounter column focusing on millennial life by Brent Crampton. To share your significant life experiences, email millennials@omahapublications.com

Today is Jan. 7, 2017, and yesterday I walked out of House of Loom one last time. It was a place that I co-owned, DJed at, and curated events for. The scene I left was only a shell. There were no swirling lights or sounds, no Victorian lounge vibes, and certainly no lively, booze-fueled conversations. Just an echo of the life that filled that place for 5 1/2 years remained (along with the bustle of a construction crew ripping a hole in the wood floor).

Loom was many things to many people, but to me it was a lovely little social experiment that blended cultures, creatives, and communities. Categorically, it was a nightclub and event venue, but to the folks frequenting its experiences, it was a place where patrons and friends could mobilize around causes, express emotions, mourn passings, and celebrate life’s contrasts.

The influx of people was so fluid that you could not distinguish it as a straight or gay bar, but simply as a people’s bar. On its best nights, it brought together folks who normally wouldn’t intersect in our city, and lifted us out of the doldrums of our daily lives.

It is rare for a business to shut down without the force of an unpaid bill. As a friend and fellow small business owner says, it is a gift to be able to close on your own terms. And that is exactly what we did. For myself and the other owners, House of Loom was never meant to be permanent. It was a successful social experiment. And it was time to move on.

I have spent the past 13 years of my life fervently dedicated to contributing to Omaha’s nightlife. With this new year, I embark on a new chapter—one where the loud and flashy peaks of club life are swapped for the quiet joy of watching my 1-year-old baby stand on her own for the first time. Now, spontaneous social gatherings are traded for intimate dinner parties (often planned months in advance). Instead of falling asleep as the sun rises, I wake up  with the sun.

It is a different life—one with its own advantages. My prior life could never hold a candle to this new world. In fact, as I write this, my baby daughter is napping away on my chest after a messy meal of liquified plums, apples, and carrots. She is tuckered out, and so am I.

This brings me to why I am writing this column. During this next chapter of my life, I will be taking some time to hibernate in the creative womb. The invitation to turn to the reflective act of writing seemed like a synchronistic opportunity. Instead of only sharing my notions of creativity and thought from behind a DJ booth, I will gladly be able to do so in this space.

Much like my life right now, I am going to ad-lib my writing. Most likely I will touch on topics ranging from the social impact of nightlife (of course), the curiosities of parenting (because I’m new at this), food (because I get giddy when I eat good food), and inclusiveness and equality (because of our new president), all through the millennial lens of a 30-something, post-nightclub-owning new papa.

Here’s to new beginnings.

Brent Crampton previously co-owned House of Loom and is co-owner of Berry & Rye, a bar in the Old Market. A multi-award-winning DJ in a former life, he now prefers evenings spent at home with his family.

This article was printed in the March/April 2017 edition of Encounter.

Decisions, Decisions

August 16, 2013 by

Jobs of the future will require more skill and training than the jobs of today—this puts additional pressure on schools to innovatively prepare students. Given the multitude of complex social, political, and economic issues of today, young people must graduate from high school with higher and different levels of knowledge and skill than previous generations.

Many high schools have answered this call and offer a variety of electives beyond the required core courses. Teens can choose classes in business, industrial technology, JROTC, music, band, or food science (to name a few). The purpose of these electives is to allow teens the opportunity to either explore possible career paths or to specialize their plan of study.

High schools also work cooperatively with local community colleges and universities to offer dual enrollment and Advanced Placement courses. These courses allow high school students to earn credit toward graduation and a college/vocational program simultaneously. While many secondary schools require a specific GPA to enter these courses, it is important that all students be allowed to participate.

In addition, it is important that parents persuade their teens to experiment with various career paths during summer camps and middle school. How many of us knew exactly which career we wanted by the age of 14? While it may seem unrealistic to think that a young adult would be able to select their lifelong career by their freshman year, it is vital that young people seize the opportunity to earn valuable training or college credits during high school. Many high schools are even starting to offer new ways to prepare students to explore possible career interests in a hands-on learning approach with business partners.

Schools need to strike a balance between exploration, career advancement, and college readiness. Our future as a nation and the future of each student depend upon the opportunity to receive a quality education with intellectual depth. Each student deserves the opportunity to meet the challenges of the future as informed and thoughtful citizens.