Tag Archives: country

Review: Frank Foster’s Redneck Rock ’N’ Roll

June 18, 2018 by
Photography by provided

Frank Foster was a sweet relief on a sweltering summer night.

The country musician performed in Omaha on Friday, June 15, at The Waiting Room Lounge (with Bucka Ruse opening the night).

Although Foster has been independently producing music since the release of his first album in 2011, Rowdy Reputation, the line of people waiting outside for the doors to open before the show demonstrated his rapidly growing fan base.

When Foster took the stage a little after 10 p.m., the energy in the room felt like the air before a summer thunderstorm.

Most of the roughly 70 people in the audience were on their feet in front of the stage, dancing and having a good time listening to music that Foster describes as “Redneck Rock ’N’ Roll”—also the title of the second song in his set.

He seemed to channel the look and sound of country stars Jason Aldean and Kenny Chesney, with Foster’s own Louisiana style tying it all together. Before finding national success with his music, the self-described “country boy” had a job working in an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. The oil fields have also inspired Foster songs such as “Rig and the Road.”

Foster’s stage presence could have filled an arena, making it a special treat to catch him up close at The Waiting Room. His constant movement and tendency to jump up and stand on the speakers pumped up the energy and gave the show a big-time feel.

Foster interspersed a few slow songs in his set of upbeat, sing-along songs, but the most exciting song had the refrain “In the South, they get loud,” from his upcoming album set to debut in September.

If audience members weren’t Frank Foster fans before, they are now.


Visit frankfostermusic.com for more information.

Living with 
Livestock in Omaha

June 19, 2017 by and
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Hungry for a taste of the simple life? You don’t have to sacrifice the convenient luxuries of living in the Omaha metro.

Nick Batter, a lawyer who raises livestock in the Ponca Hills area, knows how to get the best of both worlds.

From left: Nick Batter and Jill Stigge

Batter owns five acres near Hummel Park, just outside of the city limits. He says he can’t imagine any other place where a young professional can raise a pig or shoot a shotgun in his or her front yard, and then drive 10 minutes to have sushi or see a Broadway show.

Urban Logistical Hassles

After first determining whether barnyard animals are allowed in your neighborhood, Batter says there are some challenges to raising livestock in the Omaha metro.

“There’s not many people to buy livestock from,” he says. He has to go on road trips to get animals. He must be selective about breeds due to space limitations: He raises a more docile breed of pig and a shorter-legged sheep (it runs slower). He doesn’t have space to overwinter animals either.

Batter’s livestock selection changes throughout the year to accommodate his space. He gets baby animals in spring and slaughters them after the first frost. By the end of April, he already had sheep, lambs, goats, rabbits, laying hens, and was expecting four pigs to arrive soon.

Limited access to feed stores presents another logistical challenge in the Omaha metro,  he says. For a variety of reasons (including his professional schedule), he has to buy feed on Sundays, and only one store is open when he’s available—and it’s in Irvington.

Nevertheless, he says the perks of animal husbandry outweigh any hassle.

Perks of Residential Livestock

Batter says his animals mostly “live off the land,” and their diet is only supplemented by feed. His rabbits and sheep eat grass. “Goats eat everything green,” he says.

He pens the pigs under mulberry, walnut, and oak trees. So, the pigs eat plenty of berries, nuts, and acorns. Batter finishes fattening them on black walnuts, a “very American walnut,” he says.

Batter doesn’t need to mow the lawn. The sheep do it. His two border collies make sure the sheep don’t leave the property.

He says the animal pens are near his home due to space limitations. His window faces the pens, so if predators are in the area—and his animals are distressed—he knows quickly.

Batter eats fresh eggs and chicken. “Keep them warm, keep them watered, keep them fed,” he says of the chickens. “They really do the rest.” He gets two to three dozen eggs a day. “They’re producing eggs like crazy,” Batter says. “I’m not even feeding them.”

The chickens eat bugs and grass, which they prefer. Batter enjoys sharing eggs. “Sharing eggs is expressive,” he says. “Time goes into it. It’s a way to share your personal time with somebody.”

Batter practices ethical husbandry and reaps the rewards, both in food and in spirit. “I’m not divorcing myself from the process [of processing animals],” Batter says. He knows his animals have a good life. “Every day of their lives is terrific except for the last day,” Batter says, adding that it pains him to waste meat: “You realize it came from a life.” And in the case of his backyard farm, a life that he nurtured and raised.”

Do It Yourself

Before investing in urban livestock, would-be farmers must research the zoning of their neighborhood. Circumstances are different all across the Omaha metro. To be safe, the University of Nebraska’s Douglas-Sarpy County Extension Office encourages homeowners to check with neighborhood associations or county planning and zoning offices.

“There are so many different situations, SIDs, acreages, in city limits, out of city limits,” says Monte Stauffer, an educator with the county extension office. “The person who can make that decision is at the county courthouse; you just have to give them an address.”

For advice on raising chickens, Stauffer suggests reaching out to Brett Kreifels, an extension assistant with a master’s degree in poultry production. Meanwhile, Stauffer (an animal sciences and animal husbandry expert) can answer any questions about pigs, calves, horses, sheep, and goats.

Kreifels and Stauffer are available by phone at 402-444-7804. A receptionist at the Douglas-Sarpy County Extension Office directs queries to the relevant experts on staff.

“You can do it for several reasons: to try to generate additional income, to produce your own food, or provide an educational opportunity to young people—giving them some chores to do, some responsibility that they may not get them in trouble,” Stauffer says.

Visit extension.unl.edu/statewide/douglas-sarpy for more information.

Eggs, sausages, and bacon harvested from the farm.

This article was printed in the July/August 2017 Edition of Omaha Home.

Omaha CVB

February 24, 2017 by

This year Boys Town celebrates its 100th year. The Los Angeles Times recently ranked Boys Town’s anniversary as one of the top-10 milestones of 2017, encouraging people to visit the historic landmark and “add cultural and historical heft to your 2017 travels.”

In 1917 Father Edward J. Flanagan, a 31-year old priest, borrowed $90 to rent a boarding house to take care of troubled and neglected children here in Omaha. Since then, Boys Town has grown into an international treasure. It now helps millions of people from across the globe. It is also one of Omaha’s best-known attractions, welcoming thousands of visitors—including presidents, first ladies, sports legends, and actors—each year.  And while the celebrity of Boys Town has certainly helped put it and Omaha on the map, it is the everyday visitor who is the constant. Visitors can explore chapels and gardens, tour Father Flanagan’s home, visit his tomb at Dowd Chapel, walk through the Hall of History, and even see the world’s largest ball of stamps. That’s right—Boys Town is home to a ball of stamps that weighs more than 600 pounds (talk about selfie gold). Boys Town offers daily tours, step-on guided tours for bus groups, and interactive tours where all you need is your smartphone. QR codes are strategically placed outside Boys Town attractions; scan the codes with your phone and instantly access facts, photos, and videos at each attraction.

With the canonization process underway, the prospect of Father Flanagan being named a saint has wide-ranging implications on Boys Town’s future and on Omaha as a visitor destination. In addition to the current $1.2 billion development being planned nearby, sainthood would mean even more growth on and around the Boys Town campus. Father Flanagan’s tomb would be honored in a new structure that would need to accommodate thousands of visitors a day.  Other developments may include a museum, shops, and possibly one or more hotels. With sainthood comes enhanced international awareness of this historic campus in the middle of the country and would make it and Omaha one of the newest destinations for religious pilgrimages.

It is an exciting time for this Omaha gem that will certainly leave lasting impressions well beyond the next 100 years.

Keith Backsen is executive director of the Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This article was printed in the Spring 2017 edition of B2B.

Life Through a Lens

January 10, 2014 by
Photography by Rick Anderson

You have seen his work, although you may not know his name. He’s the man behind the iconic aerial stadium posters of the Nebraska Cornhuskers for the last 20 seasons. Whether it’s his peaceful imagery of rural farm scenes welcoming visitors to Alegent Creighton’s Bergan Mercy Medical Center or his engaging shots of Omaha decorating Mayor Jean Stothert’s office, the work of famed photographer Rick Anderson seems to be popping up everywhere lately.

Anderson travels the world in search of the next big “get.” Success in photography can’t be planned, and it can happen in the blink of an eye—the flash of a shutter. Like the moment lightning strikes. He goes island-hopping on cruise ships that he calls “taxicabs.” “It’s like I’m going on an Easter egg hunt looking for the next egg, whether it’s a flower or a palm tree or a chicken running in the street in the Virgin Islands.” He’s sloshed about in the foamy Costa Rican waters capturing waves next to a volcano. He’s camped out in the Yukon National Forest’s wintery white snowscape and has soaked in the dead silence of the scrubby Sandhills of Nebraska. From the sunny coasts of Hawaii to the glacial peaks of Alaska, there is no trek too far for a man who is truly enthralled by the beauty of the world that surrounds him.

Parkway-OP

The sign of a true artist, he admits that he is not even in control of his destinations. He’s just along for the ride, much like a tornado. “Then the wind catches me, and I’m caught up in my own tornado, and it’s turning me and turning me,” he says. “It’s like the wind is taking me on this endless journey. In the back of my mind I’m thinking this has got to surface someday where I see the other side of the rainbow, and it all makes sense.”

Anderson speaks in snapshots. He describes his humanitarian mission to Cuba. “I went on a sailboat. We pulled into Havana at sunrise. I pulled into the harbor, and the sun was coming up, and all the lights were glistening in the water,” he says. “It was one of the neatest experiences I’ve ever had.”

Even as a little boy he was hypnotized by the lens and the eye-catching objects they bring into focus. He remembers being about 8 years old in the mid-’70s and chasing the hot air balloons that would launch near the Miracle Hills area where he grew up, which was the edge of town at the time. “I would run up to my bedroom and get my little 110 camera, run down, hop on my bike, and I would chase those balloons just to take pictures of them,” he says.

Winter-Tree_OP

It was later in his life that he would realize photography as his true passion. As an adult, he instinctively picked up the camera after the birth of his son. “I photographed him every day. I had a knack for taking photos.” He next tackled windmills, then sunsets, then sunsets and windmills together. He decided to set up a camera and shoot the lights with the sunset at Gene Leahy Mall. Then he was on to something. His friends were impressed. “They were like, ‘Wow, Rick, this is really good.’ I got goosebumps. I got kind of a high off of that.” It was his “aha” moment. “I had a purpose. I could do something,” he says.

Alaska is his favorite locale to capture the moment. “I have no words for it. You don’t know where to point your camera. There is just so much, whether it was just a simple pinecone or a little trickling stream. I saw 29 bears in three-and-a-half days.” But he is just as happy driving a few hours down the road to the Nebraska Sandhills, where one can hear crickets, prairie dogs, and the occasional cow. “You can hear a meadowlark and a train maybe off in the distance. It’s just a beauty all of its own. People have no idea what they are missing by just going out there and smelling the wildflowers.”

Artists—all artists—have a knack for capturing and expressing magic, but Anderson demurs that luck has at least a little to do with it. “It’s like going fishing. Sometimes you come back with the big one, sometimes you don’t.”

An Omahan in Omo Valley

August 26, 2013 by

It all started with National Geographic magazines. If you were a kid like me, you thumbed through them and dreamed about the exotic places that were halfway around the world. African stories always caught my eye. So unusual. So different from life in Nebraska.

Especially Ethiopia

I recently traveled to Ethiopia, spending several weeks exploring the culture and the country. Like most of you, when I travel, I pack my passions. In my case, that’s business ethics. Wherever I went, I asked about business practices and economic development. I learned a great deal about the ethics of the people and, in the process, I reflected on our Greater Omaha values. Let me share two experiences.

Hawassa University

At Hawassa University, I spent time with Dean Fitsum Assefa’s faculty and MBA students. We talked about business ethics as a competitive advantage. In a country ranked 114 of 147 on Transparency International’s Corruption Index, the consensus among students was that being ethical would not lead to business success. My experience is that our Greater Omaha students think differently than this. What is your opinion?

Omo Valley and Economic Development

One of the most intriguing destinations in Ethiopia is the Omo Valley. Through the heat and the mud, we traveled to the Valley to interact with its tribespeople. I grew up on a farm, but I have never experienced this kind of outdoor life where people live with their cattle herds and have only the most basic shelters. The customs of the people are exotic—the Mursi women wear lip plates, the Hamer people use cattle jumping as a rite of passage to manhood, and the Bumi participate in scarification. There are no other people on the planet like the people of the Omo Valley.

Herein lies the rub. The Ethiopian government has a plan for economic development. They are selling tribal land in the Omo Valley, primarily to foreign investors, to create sugar cane plantations. In tandem, they are building factories to process the sugar cane. The plan is to entice the tribespeople to work in the factories to alleviate their extreme poverty.

It is difficult to imagine the challenges for Ethiopian leaders, one of the poorest countries in the world. They must promote economic development. (Our Greater Omaha leaders have that responsibility here, too, right?) But their plan will literally destroy the tribal cultures.

So I talked to Mrs. Moges, the CEO of Travel Ethiopia, the largest travel agency in the country, and a member of the Addis Ababa Chamber of Commerce. I asked what she thought of the plan and its implication for the tribes. Mrs. Moges said, “The Omo Valley is Travel Ethiopia’s daily bread and butter. I know that the plan will destroy tribal culture and affect my business. But I think that is okay. Why? Think of the women. Daily, they carry bundles of sticks for firewood. They walk one to five miles a day with heavy containers to collect water. Childbirth is a nightmare. Is it okay to change the tribal cultures? You bet it is.”

I have been deep in thought since returning from my Ethiopian trip. When is it acceptable to change a people’s way of life for the sake of economic development? When should we save a way of life, knowing that doing so will stifle economic development? In Omaha, we have asked these kinds of questions, too, about our culture, our historical buildings, etc.

This I know: There are those who hold onto the past and those who grasp towards the future. In that tension, change is generated, and this is where communities’ values are revealed.

Beverly Kracher, Ph.D., is Executive Director of Business Ethics Alliance and Chair of Business Ethics & Society at Creighton University’s College of Business.