Tag Archives: Christina Jansen

Mid-Century Modern

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann, Kristine Gerber

In post-World War II America, a contemporary design style borne of the modernist movement and emphasizing a balance of form and function came to the attention of visionary Omaha developers and architects. The resulting homes and buildings completed in that style made for some distinctive neighborhoods that endure as models of aesthetics and utility and that continue to fascinate owners and onlookers alike.

What became known as Mid-Century Modern is seeing a resurgence in interest today among preservationists and restorers, thanks in part to television shows like Mad Men and their celebration of vintage culture. That interest was never more evident than during a October Mid-Century Modern tour sponsored by Restore Omaha and Omaha 2020 that drew a record 850 participants.

elevation drawing 106 s 89th crop copy

Sketch drawn by architect Donald Polsky

Restore Omaha President Kristine Gerber says it was the organization’s first tour to focus on an architectural style, and the Indian Hills neighborhood offered “the best collection” of Mid-Century Modern. A 2010 Omaha Historic Building Survey of Mid-Century Modern neighborhoods by Leo A. Daly architects Christina Jansen and Jennifer Honebrink offered a blueprint or map for the tour.

For tour participants, it meant getting inside homes they may have long-admired from afar or been curious to see for themselves the various ways in which these structures bring the outdoors “in.”

Mid-Century Modern homeowners like Mark Manhart and Bonnie Gill love their residences. “We both feel we have lived here forever and plan no move now or later,” says Manhart.

Gerber says there’s growing appreciation for the style’s ahead-of-its-time characteristics of flat roofs, open floor plans, floor-to-ceiling windows, ample natural light, and green design-construction elements.

There’s motivation, too, in obtaining National Register of Historic Places status for select Mid-Century Modern structures and neighborhoods that qualify.

Mid-Century Modern can be found in other metro neighborhoods besides Indian Hills, but some intentional decisions made it the prime site for it to flower here.

Food manufacturer brothers Gilbert and W. Clarke Swanson, along with architect Leo A. Daly, saw potential to develop a modern, upscale suburban neighborhood taking its name from the old Indian Hills Golf Course. Commercial structures, such as Christ the King Church and the Leo A. Daly company headquarters, became shining examples of this modernist-inspired architectural style.

Leo A. Daly company headquarters.

Leo A. Daly company headquarters is a shining model of modernist-inspired architecture.

But it was left up to a pair of edgy young architects, Don Polsky and Stanley J. How, Sr., to design dozens of residential homes in this new development featuring the attributes, values, and principles of Mid-Century Modern. How also designed one of Omaha’s most distinctive luxury apartment buildings, the sleek Swanson Towers, in Indian Hills. The building has since been converted to condominiums.

Together, the Swansons, Daly, How, and Polksy transformed the “built Omaha.”

“They were young tigers and weren’t necessarily rooted in doing the same old thing, and I think they saw an opportunity to do some things that were really unique and new,” says Stan How, president of Stanley J. How Architects, the company his late father founded. He says his father was “a cutting-edge guy.”

Polsky apprenticed with superstar modernist architect Richard Neutra in Los Angeles and borrowed concepts from his mentor and others for the work he did in Omaha. He says Mid-Century Modern’s appeal all these years later makes sense because its forward-thinking approaches and emphasis on clean lines, simplicity, and efficient use of space are what many homebuyers look for today.

“We were green before its time, we put in a lot of insulation, we shaded our windows, we oriented things towards light, and brought light into the home. We used insulating glass, we planted trees to give us shade, we broke the wind from the north, and we worked with the client’s budget on the configuration of the sight,” Polsky says. Passive solar features and energy-efficient systems were rarities then.

Stan How says his father began practicing architecture for Leo A. Daly right as the modernist movement caught on. “He started his career at a perfect time to absorb all these new things going on. When he went out on his own, he had some clients who had the guts, he’d always say, to explore some of these ideas and let him toy around with that.” Mike Ford became a key early client.

Stan How, Sr., turned his business over to his son in 1990 but still came into the office every day until his death in December 2011.

Stan How, Sr., turned his business over to his son in 1990 but still came into the office every day until his death in December 2011.

“Mike was a young guy who wanted to do something really new, so my dad floated out the contemporary style or what we now call Mid-Century Modern, and Mike loved it. But he also didn’t want to be the only one on the street with a house like that, so he bought four lots and said, ‘Let’s do four spec houses,’ and that’s what they did.”

One of those Stanley How-designed homes, built in 1963, was later purchased by Mark Manhart and Bonnie Gill. Homebuyers like Ford were the exception, however, not the rule, as Mid-Century found relatively few takers.

“We’re a pretty conservative [town], Omaha. It’s not Los Angeles. I thought you’d just show a few things and they’d be beating a path to your door, but it didn’t turn out that way,” says Polsky. “There’s still a limited supply of buyers for this type of architecture but you do what you can, you carry the torch.”

Polsky marveled though at the huge turnout to see his homes and those of his old colleague, Stanley How, Sr. “It’s amazing how many people showed up,” he says.

Don Polsky at his drafting desk.

Don Polsky at his drafting desk, circa 1979.

Stan How says designs by his father and Polsky are the antithesis of the overblown, oversized McMansions many homeowners reject today. “I think people are coming back to simplicity.” Indeed, Mark Manhart says, “the clean lines and classic simplicity” of his home are major attraction points for he and his wife and the many inquirers who call on them.

The only regret How has is that his father wasn’t around to see all the love his homes are getting today. “He would have absolutely reveled in it. He would have loved it.”

The March 1-2 Restore Omaha Conference will once again offer a strong lineup of expert preservation and restoration presenters, says Gerber, who promises a dynamic host site that gives attendees an insider’s glimpse at some landmark. For more information, visit restoreomaha.org.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga’s work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

Ambassador Apartment Renovation

October 25, 2012 by
Photography by Scott Drickey

Dundee is one neighborhood in Omaha trying to continue an historic, authentic feel. One Dundee building in particular, brimming with charm and grandeur of old, has succeeded in that effort—the Ambassador Apartments.

The 20-unit Spanish Revival building, which sits just south of Dodge Street on 49th, has undergone serious renovations over the past three years. The Ambassador was recently recognized by a regional chapter of Commercial Real Estate Workshop, CREW Midwest, as the 2012 Renovation of the Year.

Dundee Apt Ambassador Remodel

The project was the result of the vision and work of local business people Randy Wheeler, Bob Sadler, Neil Willer, and Carol Jones, who combined their individual expertise to restore the Ambassador Apartments.

The parties are equal owners of the property and each add a unique talent. Wheeler’s experience is in landscaping, while Willer is a building engineer, Sadler is an electrician, and Jones’ experience is in real estate.

The renovations were unique in that they kept many of the aspects of the 84-year-old building while incorporating several new, modern upgrades. Each unit contains modern conveniences, such as a washer/dryer, air conditioning, and modern kitchen appliances. Yet what make this property such a Dundee gem is the Spanish tile roofing, scrolled ironwork, original tile, lighting fixtures, doors and hardware, and parquet floors, in addition to the spectacular entry ways and barrel ceilings.

Walking into one of the spacious units you will feel, if for only a quick moment, like you’ve stepped back in time in many ways.

“We wanted to maintain the flavor of 1928, in addition to having all of today’s modern conveniences, while creating a beautiful place where people can live,” Wheeler said.Dundee Apt Ambassador Remodel

During the renovations, the group combined their efforts with local architects from Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture.

“They were a big help in how to configure and arrange the apartments, specifically in the kitchens and how we could modernize them and still maintain the historic aspects,” Wheeler explained.

Christina Jansen, who is a project designer with Alley Poyner Macchietto, served as a historic consultant on the renovations and said it was a great experience to work with such a rare property. The group also worked with the Omaha Historical Society in its efforts to preserve historical details.

“The building is very unique and any opportunity to preserve historic fabric is great,” Jansen said. “We focused on the historic aspects of the building with the goal of salvaging as many of them as possible.”

Dundee Apt Ambassador Remodel

Alley Poyner Macchietto also assisted the group with paperwork for tax credits and financing, which were extremely beneficial to the project, according to Wheeler.

The group was drawn to the property largely because of its architectural beauty, as they all share a passion—as do many in Dundee—to maintain an historic feel.

“It’s a great location in a great neighborhood and we are very proud and excited for the future of this property,” Wheeler said. “We all had worked on remodeling projects in the past, just nothing on this scale. You definitely had to have faith and a vision with something like this. I’m glad we were able to salvage the building and make the [new residents] living here happy.”