Tag Archives: Children’s Hospital & Medical Center

Baked Omelette

Photography by Baldwin Publishing

Try this healthy omelette for breakfast, lunch or dinner. A delicious way to add vegetables to your meal, this baked omelette is packed with zucchini, mushrooms, tomatoes, and baby greens. This quick recipe is gluten-free, too.

Find more great recipes at HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Cup diced zucchini
  • 1/2 Cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 Cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/2 Cup chopped baby greens (such as spinach, Swiss chard, or kale)
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 Cup egg whites (about 2 egg whites), lightly beaten
  • 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) milk
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh herbs (such as basil, thyme, sage, or parsley)

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • Heat a 4- to 6-inch ovenproof omelette pan (stainless steel or cast iron) on high heat until hot. Remove from heat and spray with nonstick cooking spray. Reduce heat to medium, add vegetables and sauté until caramelized, about 3 to 5 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, lightly whisk the egg, egg whites, and milk. Add egg mixture to the pan and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook eggs for 2 minutes without touching.
  • Sprinkle herbs over top of egg mixture and bake in oven for 5 to 8 minutes, or until eggs set and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from the pan and serve hot.
  • Nutrition Facts: Calories: 186; Fat: 6g; Saturated Fat: 2g;
    Cholesterol: 166mg; Sodium: 398mg; Carbohydrates: 10g;
    Fiber: 2g; Protein: 24g

Yield: 1 serving

Omelet2

Through A Glass Brightly

June 24, 2015 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

This article was published in the May/June 2015 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Halfway through our interview, Therman Statom apologizes. He didn’t anticipate our conversation
lasting so long, and he has an appointment at Children’s Hospital he doesn’t want to break.
The internationally renowned glass artist has been working on large-scale cloud pieces for a new
pediatric wing, and although he’s technically completed them, an 8-year-old girl is contributing the finishing touches. “She has cancer, and her father says she used to hate going to the hospital,” he explains, “but now she can’t wait to come” because of this project.

That’s why we take an hour-and-a-half break. The young girl is meeting Statom to talk about the project, and he doesn’t want to cancel or keep her waiting. That commitment to children defines much of the artist’s career. He may be acclaimed for his airy glass houses, chairs, and ladders, but it’s his passion for making a difference in young people’s lives for which he’d prefer to be known.

That passion goes back to his own formative years growing up in Washington, D.C. Although the son of physician, he was a typical “problem child,” going through high school after high school. Unlike most troubled kids who had run-ins with the law, however, Statom did something different: he hung out at the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art. “The Smithsonian was like a home to me. It was like an extra room in my house. It’s where I found myself,” he recounts. “I was there so much, I got befriended by a curator, and he got me a job mixing clay.”

That job triggered an interest that eventually led to his attending the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, where he pursued clay as an artistic medium. “In clay I made a bunch of ugly pots. They were all brown,” he laughs. “Then I started blowing glass, and I went from very traditional to really exploring. Glass was immediate. You didn’t have to fire it two or three times. You could go into the studio and have something the next day.”

He soon discovered a particular talent for working in his new material. Statom created an arced sculpture out of clear glass cones, which earned him advanced standing at the school and enabled him to graduate early. From there, he went on to earn his MFA in 1978 from the Pratt Institute School of Art and Design, where he made the jump from blowing glass to working with sheets of it. “I didn’t want to be limited,” he explains. “It’s about exploring and questioning creatively and the actual act of making. It’s about challenging yourself and learning as an individual. I have a real interest in that.”

That interest prompted him to push the boundaries of glass as art, often using the material in unexpected ways. “I like to paint on translucent surfaces,” he says. “I consider myself a painter, and I think of glass as a canvas. If I had it my way, I’d paint on air.”

For years, museums have been taking notice of Statom’s unorthodox approach, and today his work is in the permanent collections of, among others, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and the place where it all began: the Smithsonian, which features one of his signature painted pieces in the Renwick Gallery at the American Art Museum.

For as important as his own creative success is, however, Statom isn’t interested in his identity as an artist. “You don’t do anything unless you’re actively making a difference,” he emphasizes. “It’s not just narcissistic. It’s about making kids happy here and now. You have to engage. I’m more intrigued with helping people.”

To that end, he’s worked with children through a broad range of organizations, including a children’s hospital in Norfolk, VA, and the U.S. Department of State’s Art in Embassies program, through which he’s led workshops in such far-flung places as Mozambique and Turkey. Closer to home, he’s worked with the Omaha Public School’s Native American Indian Education Department, Kanesville Alternative School in Council Bluffs, Yates Alternative School in Gifford Park, and even local
Girl Scout troops.

No matter where he works with kids, the goal remains the same: to affect change in children through art. “I have kids who claim that activities in art save their lives,” Statom says. “That’s pretty big.”

Another hour into the interview, Statom glances at the clock. “It’s time to go,” he announces. There’s another girl he doesn’t want to keep waiting—his daughter. She’s about to get out of school, and just like the little girl at the hospital, he has no intention of keeping her waiting.

ThermanStaton

Breakfast Banana Bread

February 13, 2014 by

Don’t throw away those mushy bananas. Very ripe bananas are just what you need for this banana bread recipe. Wrap individual slices for a quick breakfast or healthy snack.

Ingredients (Yield: 14 servings)

  • ½ cup (1 stick) margarine, at room temperature
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ cup fat-free sour cream
  • 1 cup mashed, very ripe bananas
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts or pecans, optional

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Lightly coat a 9×5-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.
  2. With a hand mixer, beat margarine and sugar in a bowl until creamy.
  3. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat about 3 to 5 minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add to the margarine mixture and mix until just combined.
  5. Add vanilla, sour cream, and bananas; mix to combine. Stir in nuts, if using. Pour into prepared pan.
  6. Bake about 1 hour and 10 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let rest in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes and then turn out onto rack to cool completely.

Nutrition Facts
Calories: 171
Fat: 6g
Saturated Fat: 2g
Cholesterol: 16mg
Sodium: 245mg
Carbohydrates: 29g
Fiber: 2g
Protein: 3g

*Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s nutritional content.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Rice Krispies Treats (with a Twist!)

January 20, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Did you know that you can make Rice Krispies treats without marshmallows? No empty calories here! Creamy peanut butter, maple syrup, and honey give this kid-friendly snack a high-energy boost.

Ingredients (Yield: 16 bars)

  • 6½ cups Rice Krispies® cereal
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 1 cup creamy peanut butter
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 Tbsp trans-fat free margarine

Preparation

  1. Lightly coat a 9×9-inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray.
  2. In a large bowl, combine Rice Krispies and raisins. Set aside.
  3. In a microwave-safe container, combine peanut butter, maple syrup, honey, and margarine and microwave on high for 1 minute. Remove from microwave and stir.
  4. Pour peanut butter mixture over Rice Krispies mixture. Stir to coat the cereal and raisins.
  5. Using your hands, press mixture into pan. Refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight, covered.
  6. Cut into16 bars. Keep bars refrigerated.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 bar
Calories: 190
Fat: 9g
Saturated Fat: 2g

Cholesterol: 0
Sodium: 158mg
Carbohydrates: 24g
Fiber: 2g
Protein: 5g

* Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s nutritional content

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Boxes of Cheer

January 5, 2014 by
Photography by Justin Barnes

Northwestern Mutual employees recently teamed with the Children’s Hospital & Medical Center Foundation to deliver 170 boxes of cheer to children suffering from cancer and other ailments.

“Look, Mom, it’s a glow sword!” 5-year-old Sammy Nahorny chirps as he digs through a bright green Cheeriodicals box packed to the brim with smile-inducing toys, crafts, and more. Sammy, who lives in Columbus, is battling neuroblastoma.

His mother, Erin, is the recipient of her own Cheeriodicals box, this one loaded with reading materials (including Omaha Magazine and HerFamily) along with other grown-up goodies. “We haven’t seen a smile like that on Sammy’s face in three or four days.” She beams as her son shifts his attention to adorning his fingers with light rings and laser talons. “Whoever came up with this idea is a genius,” she adds. “What a fabulous boost it is to have you here doing this for Sammy.”

IMG_9139

Cheeriodicals is a web-based company offering a wide array of customizable gift boxes for all seasons and reasons. The boxes delivered that day were carefully curated so that each child would receive age- and gender-specific surprises. Two Men and a Truck donated its time and people to transport the treasures to the hospital.

“This was a wonderful event that brought our team together to help give back to the community and spend time with so many special children and their families at Children’s Hospital,” says Michael Tews, managing partner of Northwestern Mutual of Nebraska. “We were honored to have the opportunity to bring a smile to so many families.”

“It was amazing that Northwestern Mutual could join us in this way,” says Alyssa DeFrain, development officer of the Foundation. “We could tell they had a great time getting to know our young patients, but what they didn’t get to see was that those little green boxes continued to bring big cheer to the kids and families for many days after the event.”

Gingerbread Men

December 12, 2013 by

Baking holiday treats with the kids is a tradition in many families. This year, look for ways to trim up your favorite recipes and share a gift of good health.

Ingredients (Yield: 32 cookies)

  • 2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1¼ cups sifted whole wheat flour
  • ¾ tsp baking soda
  • 1 Tbsp ground ginger
  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground cloves
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¾ cup (1½  sticks) trans fat free margarine, softened
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ½ cup unsulphured molasses

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 350°.
  • In a large bowl, sift together flours, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside.
  • In another bowl, using a hand mixer, cream together margarine and brown sugar until fluffy. Mix in egg and molasses until combined. Gradually add flour mixture.
  • Divide dough into thirds and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for about 2 hours, or until firm.
  • Dust rolling pin lightly with flour; roll out each piece of dough on wax paper until it is about 1/8 inch thick. Dip cookie cutter in flour and use to cut out gingerbread man (or other desired shapes).
  • Transfer cookies onto baking sheet. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes until golden brown. With a metal spatula, transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 cookie
Calories: 100
Fat: 4g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 6mg
Sodium: 106mg
Carbohydrates: 16g
Fiber: 1g
Protein: 1g

* Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s nutritional content.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Turkey Soup

November 26, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

It’s the perfect way to warm up on a chilly day. Try this easy turkey soup that can also add a welcome, new twist to Thanksgiving leftovers.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup diced carrot
  • ½ cup diced celery
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • ½ tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried basil
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes, with liquid
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 can (15 oz) great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups (about 16 ounces) cubed cooked turkey
  • ½ cup cubed zucchini
  • 1 Tbsp dried parsley

Preparation

  1. In a large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until softened, about 4 minutes.
  2. Stir in carrot, celery, pepper, oregano, and basil. Cover and cook over low heat for 5 minutes.
  3. Add tomatoes with their liquid, water, broth, beans, and turkey and stir. Cover saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer gently for 30 minutes.
  4. Add zucchini and parsley and cook until zucchini is cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve.

Yield: 8 servings

 

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 165, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 0g, Cholesterol: 47mg, Sodium: 528mg, Carbohydrates: 14g, Fiber: 4g, Protein: 21g

* Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s 
nutritional content.

ADHD

September 24, 2013 by

One of the most common neurobehavioral disorders found among children is Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And rates are on the rise.

Dr. Ashley Harlow, psychologist at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, believes that this spike in diagnoses is due to a combination of factors. “Parents, teachers, and [health care] providers are more aware of the signs and symptoms and, therefore, are investigating this diagnosis as a possibility,” he says.

Because ADHD is so prevalent, there is concern that children are being misdiagnosed.

Misdiagnosis can go many ways, explains Dr. Harlow. “I think misdiagnosis is a problem, although I think it is important to consider misdiagnosis as both diagnosing another condition as ADHD and diagnosing ADHD as another condition.

“I see kids who have been diagnosed with ADHD because they do not like their teacher, they do not listen to their parents, or they do not follow through on what their parents tell them to do,” says Dr. Harlow. “These behaviors do not necessarily indicate ADHD.”

Also complicating the issue are instances where children have ADHD and are instead diagnosed with another disorder, like Autism Spectrum Disorder, or when high-school and college students use ADHD medication to support studying. “In these cases of students seeking study aids, misdiagnosis might occur because of misrepresentation of the symptoms by the patient,” adds Dr. Harlow.

Dr. Harlow says that visible signs of ADHD can include behaviors like “difficulty sitting still in the classroom, disorganization in completing homework or turning it in, making careless mistakes, staring off into space, interacting with peers in immature ways, or starting chores but not finishing them.”

Many children may demonstrate these behaviors, so Dr. Harlow advises careful consideration before jumping to conclusions. “[Health care] providers, in consultation with families, work to determine if enough symptoms are present and impairment is at a level to warrant a clinical diagnosis.”

The CDC states that “children with ADHD do not grow out of these behaviors. The symptoms continue and can cause difficulty at school, at home, or with friends.” Therefore, it is important to treat children who are afflicted with ADHD.

Treatment of ADHD focuses on reducing the impact of the symptoms, not eliminating them. “It is important to remember that ADHD is a neurologically based disorder, and so improving behavior likely means learning to manage symptoms rather than removing the symptoms entirely,” explains Dr. Harlow.

He recommends a combination of medical and behavioral health interventions, including setting up the environment (classroom or home) to be predictable and organized for the child and to make consequences immediate and consistent.

Children’s Hospital & Medical Center offers free parent education sessions related to topics surrounding ADHD. For more information, visit ChildrensOmaha.org/BehavioralHealth.

Gluten-Free Brownies

These brownies are a delicious treat that should please almost everyone in the family. Fudgy and rich, they’re also gluten-free!

Ingredients (yield 12 servings)

  • ½ cup reduced calorie trans fat-free margarine
  • 5 oz dark chocolate chips
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup brown rice flour
  • ½ cup almonds, processed into a fine meal/flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ cup chopped pecans or walnuts, optional
  • ½ cup semisweet chocolate chips, optional

Preparation

  • Preheat the oven to 350°. Line an 8 x 8-inch baking pan with foil and lightly coat with nonstick cooking spray.
  • In the microwave, melt margarine and dark chocolate chips in a large, microwave-safe measuring cup, in 20-second intervals, until melted. Stir until smooth. Set aside.
  • In a mixing bowl, whisk eggs until frothy.
  • Add brown sugar and whisk for 1 minute, or until the mixture is smooth.
  • Gradually add the melted chocolate mixture into the egg-sugar mixture, and mix well for 1 minute, or until the chocolate is smooth and glossy.
  • In a bowl, combine rice flour, almond meal, salt, and baking soda; whisk together. Add to the chocolate mixture and mix well for 1 minute. Add vanilla and mix for 30 seconds.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared baking pan. Tap the pan on the counter to even out the batter.
  • If desired, layer nuts and/or semisweet chocolate chips over the top of the batter and press them in slightly.
  • Bake for 33 to 35 minutes or until the brownies are set. Cool on a wire rack; remove the brownies from the pan by gripping the foil edges. Chill before cutting.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 brownie
Calories: 235
Fat: 12g
Saturated Fat: 4g
Cholesterol: 29mg
Sodium: 234mg
Carbohydrates: 31g
Fiber: 2g
Protein: 4g

* Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s nutritional content.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness. 

Concussions and Young Athletes

August 16, 2013 by

Here’s a question for parents—Can you describe a concussion? It’s more than a headache or a momentary blackout. Doctors consider it a traumatic brain injury, ranging from mild to severe, caused by a blow or jolt to the head. With young athletes back on the field, Kody Moffatt, M.D., a pediatrician and sports medicine specialist at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, wants parents, coaches, and trainers to know the signs.

“We know much more about concussions today than we did even a year or two ago. A concussion in a child or teenager is different than in an adult. The impact on the developing brain can be a real problem,” says Dr. Moffatt.

Football poses a risk, particularly when players tackle with their heads down.

“I tell parents that football, in general, is a safe sport as long as young people don’t lead with the head,” he explains. “Coaches in our area have been really good about teaching young, developing players to use the shoulder or chest as the first point of contact.”

Symptoms of a concussion are as individual as children themselves. Visible signs of a suspected concussion are:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Slow to get up
  • Unsteady on feet, falling over, or trouble balancing
  • Dazed or blank look
  • Confused, not able to remember plays or events

Dr. Moffatt says athletes with a suspected concussion should not return to the field. They need to see a doctor. Immediate emergency care should be provided when the player is vomiting, has a seizure, experiences neck pain, is increasingly confused, or is unable to stay awake.

Nationally and across all levels of play, from professional to recreational leagues, the emphasis has been on “return to play.” This focus surrounds the safe return to the game following diagnosis and treatment. This fall, “return to learn” will receive increased attention, too.

“Before young athletes are returning to play, we need to get them back in the classroom symptom-free and able to learn like they did before the concussion,” says Dr. Moffatt. “We have to keep in mind that we’re dealing with a brain injury. This can result in learning problems that impact a student athlete’s academic performance.”

The new Sports Medicine Clinic at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center will work with student athletes, their families, and teachers to customize a “return to learn” plan. Dr. Moffatt considers it to be an important part of the recovery process.

“Return to learn is a significant step, in my mind. We’re considering cognitive function and how we help the brain heal,” he says. “We’ll work with schools to help kids get back on track in the classroom.”

The Sports Medicine Clinic at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center is open to families by appointment. No physician referral is needed. To make an appointment, call 402-955-PLAY (7529). For more information, visit ChildrensOmaha.org/SportsMedicine.

Passionate about pediatric sports medicine, Dr. Kody Moffatt is a highly regarded, well-known expert in the field. An athletic trainer turned pediatrician, he holds a Master of Science degree in orthopaedic surgery and is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Moffatt helps shape sports medicine policy on a state and national level as an advisor to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Nebraska High School Activities Association.