Tag Archives: breakfast

I Wanna Ore-Ida Waffle

September 1, 2017 by
Photography by Di Tendenza

Who doesn’t love tater tots? Mix them with eggs and pop them on a hot waffle iron for a fast, yummy, and filling breakfast. A delicious way to start off a busy work or school day.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups tater-tot style potatoes, frozen
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/8 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon mayonaise
  • 3/4 teapoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup bell pepper, diced (optional, combination of red and green recommended)
  • 1/4 cup onion, diced (optional)
  • Toppings (optional): 1/2 cup shredded cheese, 2 slices bacon (crumbled), 2 tablespoons salsa

Preparation

  1. Heat the waffle iron on high. Thaw the tater tots by microwaving them for 2-3 minutes, then set them aside.
  2. Whisk together the eggs, milk, mayo, salt, and pepper. Add this mixture to the tater tots and stir until tater tots are coated.
  3. Coat the heated waffle iron with cooking spray or oil.
  4. Place onion and bell peppers on the bottom (if using), then spoon half of the tater tot mixture on top of the onions and peppers. Spread out the mixture slightly and close the iron as far as possible. (It won’t shut all the way.)Place stacked waffles in 8″ pie tin.
  5. Cook for 5 minutes. Steam will arise from the waffle iron.
  6. The dish is done when the top of the “waffle” is golden brown. Serve with the suggested toppings, or invent your own.
  7. The waffles will reheat well in the microwave if there are any leftovers.

This article was printed in the Fall 2017 edition of Family Guide.

Old School Social Media

August 22, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Today, social media is brimming with food photos. But a pre-digital form of social media has been sharing favorite dishes since the 19th century. It’s probably the only “published” book containing your grandmother’s beloved gingerbread recipe. It’s the church cookbook—a repository of traditional American wisdom, which often comes complete with six variations of the same recipe (for example: lime gelatin salad with pineapple, walnuts, cottage cheese, and maraschino cherries or mandarin oranges).

Long before the invention of the computer, religious and social groups created cookbooks, often as a fundraising tool to pay for upgrades and maintenance on buildings. The first charity cookbook is believed to have been printed in 1864 as a way to subsidize medical costs for Union soldiers. The idea took the country by storm, especially with religious groups. When a church needed to replace the steeple or build an addition, the minister came to the ladies’ auxiliaries, which created cookbooks. Morris Press Cookbooks in Kearney is one of many companies that was created solely for the printing of cookbooks. They have not only printed hundreds of thousands of cookbooks for churches and social groups, but also specialty cookbooks for singer Donny Osmond, Chiquita bananas, Heinz, and others.

Brian Moffatt of Omaha has collected these cookbooks for several years, mostly church cookbooks. He finds them at estate sales and some thrift stores, and his collection includes books from local churches of nearly every denomination.

“Estate sales are huge,” Moffatt says. “I just like to look at all these and see the way people used to cook.”

Estate sales are huge because many of the people who collected—and contributed to—these community cookbooks are dying. Today’s generation shares recipes and photos of dishes on modern social media, often Pinterest.

Moffatt’s collection at one time extended to hundreds of books, which he recently whittled down to the ones he enjoys the most, such as a cookbook produced by the ladies of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church. The charm of this book, for him, is that it features several recipes from an old neighbor, Caren Guillaume.

“The older ones have some odd information in them,” Moffatt says. “A lot of them use lard, and sometimes you run across an ingredient that you just can’t find anymore.”

Other ingredients are vastly different from today’s definition. Gelatin, for example, is today often thought of as a fruit-flavored ingredient packed in school lunches and used in molded salads. Originally, however, gelatin (which was also spelled gelatine) was a jelly obtained by boiling meat on the bone until the collagen coagulated.

There are still church cookbooks being sold, but not nearly as many. While researching for this article, Omaha Magazine reached out to several area churches; none had produced a cookbook in the last five years.

Read on for several classic church cookbook recipes culled from Moffatt’s collection.”

Excerpted from Brian Moffatt’s Collection

Local Church Cookbook Recipes

Delmonico Potatoes

Submitted by Mrs. Carl Swanson for 50th Anniversary Cookbook, printed by Trinity Lutheran Church in 1965.

Dice two potatoes, boiled until just tender. Make 2 cups rich cream sauce seasoned with salt, pepper, and celery salt. Arrange a layer of potatoes in a buttered casserole, pour on half the sauce and sprinkle with 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese. Add another layer of potatoes, the rest of the sauce, and about 1/4 cup more Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle with paprika and top generously with buttered bread crumbs. Bake at 400 degrees until sauce bubbles and crumbs are brown.

Party Snack Weenies

Submitted by Mrs. Carl Swanson for 50th Anniversary Cookbook, printed by Trinity Lutheran Church in 1965.

6-ounce jar of yellow mustard

10 ounces currant (or grape) jelly

1/2 package whole weenies, cut up, or 1 package of small (cocktail) weenies.

Heat and serve in chafing dish.

Cherry Fluff Salad

Submitted by Karen Hauranek for My Favorite Recipes, printed by St. Mark Baptist Church in 1984.

1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk

1 large carton (8 ounces) whipped topping

1 can (21 ounces) cherry pie filling

1 large can (20 ounces) crushed pineapple, drained

1 cup miniature marshmallows

1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Beat sweetened condensed milk and whipped topping with mixer. Fold in remaining ingredients. Refrigerate. Salad is ready to serve in 30 minutes.

Dill Dip*

Submitted by Joyce Stranglen for From Thy Bounty, printed by St. Bernadette Catholic Church. No publication date noted.

1 1/3 cups sour cream

1 1/3 cups mayonnaise

2 tablespoons parsley

2 tablespoons minced onion

2 teaspoons dill weed

2 teaspoons Beau Monde seasoning

Mix all ingredients together several hours before serving.

*Editor’s note: Three variations of this recipe (from three different women) appear in From Thy Bounty. Mary Olson’s dip omits the parsley; Connie Gauthier’s recipe omits the onion and parsley.

Kahlua Cake

Submitted by Shirley Mackie for A Potpourri of Culinary Masterpieces, printed by Presbyterian Church of the Master in 1983.

4 eggs

1 package (15 ounces) devil’s food cake mix

1 small package (3 ounces) instant chocolate pudding mix

1 pint sour cream

3/4 cup oil*

3/4 cup Kahlua liqueur

1 cup chocolate chips

1 cup chopped nutmeats

Glaze:

2 tablespoons cocoa

3 tablespoons Kahlua liqueur

1 teaspoon water

1 tablespoon oil*

1 tablespoon corn syrup

1 cup powdered sugar

Beat eggs. Beat in cake mix, pudding mix, sour cream, oil*, and liqueur. Stir in chocolate chips and nutmeats. Mix well. Bake in greased bundt pan at 350 degrees for 50 minutes or until cake tests done.

For the glaze: In a small saucepan, combine cocoa, Kahlua, water, oil*, and corn syrup. Cook and stir over low heat until smooth. Remove from heat; immediately beat in powdered sugar. Drizzle over cake.

*Editor’s note: the recipe does not specify what is meant by oil; vegetable oil or canola oil is the likely ingredient.

Joan’s Nutritious Cookies

Submitted by Peg Russell for A Potpourri of Culinary Masterpieces, printed by Presbyterian Church of the Master in 1983.

1 cup shortening—“vegetable shortening and margarine makes it good.”

3/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup white sugar

1 1/4 cups whole wheat flour

1/4 cup wheat germ

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 teaspoon salt

2 eggs

1 teaspoon baking soda

3 1/4 cup quick oatmeal

dash each of cinnamon and nutmeg

3/4 cup raisins, plumped

nuts, if you want them

Mix shortening and sugars. Add sifted flour, salt, soda, and vanilla. Blend in oatmeal and other spices (blending in raisins and nuts last). Make into balls, then flatten a little. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Makes about three dozen.

Coconut Fruit Salad

Submitted by Caren Guillaume for Heartwarmers, printed by St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and St. James Churches in 1994.

1 No. 2 can (2 1/2 cups) pineapple tidbits

1 11-ounce can (1 1/3 cups) mandarin oranges, drained

1 cup mini marshmallows

1 cup Thompson seedless grapes

1 can (3 1/2 ounces) flaked coconut

2 cups sour cream

1/4 teaspoon salt

Combine the first five ingredients. Stir in sour cream and salt. Chill overnight. Serves eight.

Broccoli-Rice Casserole

Submitted by Barbara Kelley for Through These Red Doors, printed by All Saints Episcopal Church in 2003.

1 package (10 ounces) frozen, chopped broccoli, thawed

1 cup cooked rice

4 ounces American cheese sauce

1 onion, chopped

4 stalks celery, chopped

butter*

1 can cream of chicken soup

Sauté onion and celery in butter. Add cream of chicken soup. Mix remaining ingredients together and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

*Editor’s note: The recipe does not specify an amount of butter. Two tablespoons should work.

Scripture Cake

Submitted by Martha Dus for Kountze Kitchens, printed by Kountze Memorial Lutheran Church in 1983. The name of the cake refers to noted Bible verses featuring ingredients.

1/2 cup butter (Judges 5:25)

2 cups flour (I Kings 4:22)

1/2 teaspoon salt (Leviticus 2:13)

1 cup figs (I Samuel 30:12)

1 1/2 cups sugar (Jeremiah 6:20)

2 teaspoons baking powder (Luke 13:21)

1/2 cup water (Genesis 24:11)

1 cup raisins (1 Samuel 30:12)

3 eggs (Isaiah 10:14)

1/2 teaspoon of each: cinnamon, mace, cloves (I Kings 10:10)

1 tablespoon honey (Proverbs 24:13)

1/2 cup almonds (Genesis 43:11)

Blend butter, sugar, spices, and salt. Beat egg yolks and add to mixture. Sift in baking powder and flour, then add water and honey. Put fruit and nuts through food chopper and flour well. Add and beat. (Follow Solomon’s advice in the first clause of Proverbs 23:14—“Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell.”) Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Bake for one hour at 375 degrees.

Refrigerator Shake Pickles

Submitted by Ruth Hickman for Kountze Kitchens, printed by Kountze Memorial Lutheran Church in 1983.

2 quarts sliced cucumbers

2 cups sugar

2 cups vinegar

1/4 cup pickling salt

3/4 teaspoon celery seed

3/4 teaspoon yellow mustard seed

3/4 teaspoon turmeric

Combine sugar, vinegar, and spices. Pour over thinly sliced cucumbers. Refrigerate and shake every day for five days. These keep “indefinitely” in the refrigerator.

Rockbrook’s Hot Chicken Salad

Submitted by Iris Clark for Recipes and Remembrances, printed by Rockbrook United Methodist Church in 1999.

4 cups cooked, cubed chicken

2 cups thinly sliced celery

2 cups bread cubes

1 cup toasted chopped or slivered almonds

1 teaspoon salt plus 1 teaspoon MSG

1 tablespoon minced or chopped onion

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 cup mayonnaise (“NOT salad dressing”)

2 cans cream of chicken soup

1 cup grated sharp cheese

2 cups crushed potato chips

Combine chicken, celery, bread cubes, almonds, salt, MSG, onion, lemon juice, mayonnaise, and soup. Pile lightly into “Pam’d” 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish. Top with cheese, onion, and chips. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes.

Green Vegetable Salad (Pictured above)

Submitted by Kathy Jones for My Favorite Recipes, printed by St. Mark Baptist Church in 1984.

1 head cauliflower

2 heads broccoli

1 container cherry tomatoes, cut in halves

1 jar sliced mushrooms, drained

1 jar green olives, stuffed with pimentos.

Mix the vegetables together in a large bowl. For dressing, combine red wine vinegar, 2 packets Italian dressing seasoning, and 1 bottle of oil/vinegar Italian dressing. Pour over the vegetables.

This article was printed in the July/August 2017 Edition of 60Plus.

Over Easy

June 5, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Nick Bartholomew sat across from his father, Kent, at the Village Inn near 180th and Center. Breakfast for Kent was always the same—coffee with cream and sugar accompanied by two eggs served over easy with bacon and toast. Nick couldn’t remember what he ordered that morning, but he did recall how that meal marked a major personal and professional transition. After a lifetime of wanting to follow in his father’s footsteps, to do as Dad did, Nick wanted to break from the family securities business and follow a new path as a restaurateur.

Kent was supportive of his son’s new venture, but a bit skeptical of Nick’s idea to open a breakfast and lunch spot without omelets on the menu. Nick, however, knew what he wanted for the corner of 168th and Q—a cozy place that reflected the community surrounding it, locally sourced food, and a chef-driven drive-thru menu. Less than a year later, Over Easy, the home of the Clementine Pop-Tart and other amazing meals, was born. No omelets. No weak coffee. No rubbery pancakes or chicken-themed art allowed.

Inside is a mix of modern décor and barn wood, which has almost become a design requirement of restaurants serving local food, but Over Easy makes it work. Large windows are lined with flowers, and photos of relatives who worked in Iowa diners rest high on shelves behind the breakfast bar. For Nick, a passion for sentiment extended to the neighborhood’s most recognizable landmark, a 204-year-old cottonwood tree the city removed from the corner of 168th and Q last winter. Though his efforts to save the tree failed, he did end up with a portion of the stump, which will be converted into a bench for waiting diners and a picnic table for the restaurant’s garden.

“I have been in that pocket of the community for as long as I can remember. I went to Millard West High School, I still live in southwest Omaha and my office is on 168th and Center,” says Nick, whose voice practically bursts with enthusiasm. “I drove by that corner every day; it was just waiting for a place like this where people can come together, enjoy a good meal and each other’s company.”

He likes the idea of connecting people, but he is also a man of reason and knows that sometimes life won’t stop for breakfast, which is why he insisted on the commuter-friendly value of a drive-thru window. Chef Tim Maides developed creative versions of breakfast staples for morning commuters such as hash browns, bacon, and eggs, all with a twist. Potatoes are served as crunchy, savory rounds, and the eggs and bacon are baked into a Le Quartier baguette, which are easy to eat on the go. While you can’t order two eggs served over easy at the drive-thru, you can pull up a chair inside this little West Omaha breakfast place and order them to stay.

Nick’s dad is just fine with that. No omelet required.

Breakfast Banana Bread

February 13, 2014 by

Don’t throw away those mushy bananas. Very ripe bananas are just what you need for this banana bread recipe. Wrap individual slices for a quick breakfast or healthy snack.

Ingredients (Yield: 14 servings)

  • ½ cup (1 stick) margarine, at room temperature
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ cup fat-free sour cream
  • 1 cup mashed, very ripe bananas
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts or pecans, optional

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Lightly coat a 9×5-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.
  2. With a hand mixer, beat margarine and sugar in a bowl until creamy.
  3. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat about 3 to 5 minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add to the margarine mixture and mix until just combined.
  5. Add vanilla, sour cream, and bananas; mix to combine. Stir in nuts, if using. Pour into prepared pan.
  6. Bake about 1 hour and 10 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let rest in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes and then turn out onto rack to cool completely.

Nutrition Facts
Calories: 171
Fat: 6g
Saturated Fat: 2g
Cholesterol: 16mg
Sodium: 245mg
Carbohydrates: 29g
Fiber: 2g
Protein: 3g

*Nutritional information is based on ingredients listed and serving size; any additions or substitutions to ingredients may alter the recipe’s nutritional content.

For more healthy recipes, visit HealthyKohlsKids.com. The Healthy Kohl’s Kids program is a partnership between Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Kohl’s Department Stores to educate children and parents about healthy nutrition and fitness.

First Monday of the Month


December 3, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

There are really two different shifts for breakfast, Jeff Slobotski explains. Some show up at the 11-Worth Cafe at 7 a.m., and others don’t roll in until 8:30. But that’s okay, because the First Monday of the Month Breakfast Club of Champions isn’t 
about structure.

The idea for a monthly breakfast of professionals from all disciplines is one of those brainwaves you can’t assign to one person. Slobotski, co-founder of Silicon Prairie News, says he had a conversation with Omaha friends about getting people together around a meal. “It was that conversation and a San Francisco friend who said she was doing this first Monday of the month thing that made me think, this is a thing that should happen,” Slobotski says.

He put an open invitation on Facebook last June, inviting over 200 people to show up the following Monday at the 11-Worth Cafe on 24th and Leavenworth. “Basically we all show up for breakfast and just take over the place,” the event page reads. “We hang out, drink coffee, and get jazzed to start the day/week & month off right. Let’s do this thing. Go!”

“Honestly it wasn’t until the third time that I actually talked with Tony,” Slobotski admits. That’s Tony Caniglia, the owner of 11-Worth Cafe. Slobotski figured it would be nice to give the establishment a heads-up that things might get a little crazy for a few hours on certain Monday mornings. “We didn’t want their servers quitting after a Monday shift,” he says.

So 40-70 people show up for a chatty breakfast at a local diner. What’s the end goal here?

20130909_bs_0638

“There’s this resurgence, this energy, in the city,” Slobotski says. “People want to be involved, and I think that shows a general passion for the city. Let’s all take our labels off and just come together as people. You don’t come to this wearing a name tag with a stack of business cards.”

“We’ve seen changes in the way business networking takes place,” says Mike Battershell, vice president of Bergman Incentives and a core First Monday breakfaster. “You’re looking for opportunities to get your name out there, but you’re also just looking for ways to make your community better.”

Slobotski describes Battershell as an instigator. “Mike’s the kind of guy who won’t just post to Facebook saying something needs to happen,” he says. “He’ll give you a phone number and a name. He’s an informed instigator.”

For Battershell, the breakfasts are about spreading that information. “You’re probably going to sit next to someone you wouldn’t otherwise sit with. Say you’re a programmer, and you’re sitting next to an artist who’s sitting across from an elected official,” he says. “That’s a catalyst for business opportunities and community improvement projects.”

Diverse backgrounds are key, both agree. “I’m very passionate about not creating another insular group,” Slobotski says. “How can we continue to be open? Be proactive? Be inviting to folks from different geographies and industries, different spheres within the city?”

The welcoming nature of the 11-Worth itself doesn’t hurt. “The wait staff at 11-Worth is great,” Battershell says. “If you get up and move, they’ll remember that you had the corned beef and hash.” In fact, he says he bounces from seat to seat about four times in the morning.

Oh yes, that’s allowed. “If there’s a break in conversation, it’s totally appropriate to jump up and move on,” Slobotski assures. After all: no structure, no special recognition, no food chain.

And no judgment.

Slobotski laughingly admits he orders the same breakfast every time. “The number 11. Two eggs sunny side up, two pieces of white toast, grape jam, massive side of hash browns. The place is underground-famous for its 
hash browns.”

Restaurant Review: Vidlak’s Brookside Cafe

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

On the corner of Bob Boozer Drive and West Center Road, you will find one of West Omaha’s favorite breakfast and lunch hot spots.This would be the family-owned Vidlak’s Brookside Cafe, which has been serving the happy masses since 1996. I recently rediscovered this busy, little cafe and thought I would share my thoughts on it with you.

Vidlak’s sits in a corner endcap of a strip mall with limited parking, but that does not seem to deter guests from circling around the parking lot until they can find a spot and going in to wait for a table. Inside, it’s obvious that Vidlak’s will not be the recipients of any design or decor awards; but the restaurant is well-maintained, clean, and brightly lit. One thing that I really like about the layout of Vidlak’s is that the tables are not too crammed together, and there’s room to spread out, as well as enough light to read your Sunday newspaper.20121129_bs_5813 copy

The weekend staff at Vidlak’s is mostly young and inexperienced, which can present some issues at times. What the young staff lacks in experience they make up for in friendliness, and they never seem fazed no matter how ‘deep in the weeds’ they may actually be. Every time I have eaten at Vidlak’s, I have waited for at least 15-25 minutes for the food to come. It’s hard to tell if this is a slow service issue, slow kitchen issue, or just bad luck on my part. My hunch is that it’s probably a little of each. That being said, the regulars do not seem to mind the delay and must just chalk it up to the cost of a good, fresh-cooked breakfast after church.

The food is the reason this restaurant is so popular. The breakfast and lunch dishes are cooked fresh to order and are quite good. The menu is fairly expansive and has pretty much everything you could want in a breakfast/lunch café, as well as several signature dishes that are actually quite creative. I should also note that the portions are generous and prices are on the inexpensive side, which are both good things in my book. On a recent visit, I tried the Omaha Omelette ($7.99). This fresh-cooked 3-egg omelette has diced chicken, diced tomatoes, and broccoli topped with melted mozzarella cheese. The omelette was made the proper way, using a pan instead of a flat grill, cooked perfectly, not greasy, and was very enjoyable. The accompanying hash browns were also delicious. My dining partner had the Eggs Benedict ($7.99). Anyone who regularly orders this dish at restaurants can tell you that it’s an easy one to screw up. Not at Vidlak’s, though, as it was executed perfectly and also recommended.20121129_bs_5819 copy

Lunch at Vidlak’s is very good as well. In the past, I have tried their burgers, sandwiches, and salads, and every time the food was excellent. So if you’re looking for an inexpensive, family-friendly, fresh breakfast or lunch, and you’re not in too much of a hurry, then Vidlak’s Brookside Cafe is a place that you really must try.

Cheers!

Vidlak’s Brookside Cafe
15668 W. Center Rd.
402-330-0914
vidlaksbrooksidecafe.com

RATING (5 Stars Possible)

Food & Beverage: ***
Service: *1/2
Ambiance: **1/2
Price: Inexpensive
Overall: **1/2