Tag Archives: blog

Seven Heaven

May 2, 2017 by
Photography by Justin Barnes

Fashion blogger Hannah Almassi of whowhatwear.co.uk knows her stuff. She says spring/summer 2017’s fashion trends have “anyone who is interested in super-duper, spin-around-your-closet fashion excited.” Why? “Well, it’s an inherently upbeat season,” Almassi says. “From the many no-holds-barred interpretations on the 1980s—think lamé, jumbo frills, shoulders, bling, and legs—to the most saturated color palette we’ve seen in a decade—fuschia, scarlet, heliotrope, hazmat, more fuschia—joy is oozing from every stitch and every seam. Even stripes and florals—two trusty pillars of the summer print lineup—are back with more bite, more verve and more tempting iterations to make you think again and look twice.”

International model Tara Jean Nordbrock agrees with Almassi’s fashion forecast. Nordbrock put her own spin on seven of the blogger’s top spring/summer trends using fashions from Scout Dry Goods & Trade (5019 Underwood Ave.). “That fabulous ’80s spirit combined with this decade’s DIY culture provide inspiration for the latest trends,” Almassi says. “It’s a radical mix-up of unpredictable style. You won’t be bored.”

This article was printed in the May/June 2017 edition of Encounter.

Styling & Modeling by Tara Jean Nordbrock
Photography by Justin Barnes
Photo editing & Illustrations by Derek Joy
Intro by Eric Stoakes

Meet The Linthakhans

February 20, 2014 by
Photography by Amber Linthakhan

When David and Amber Linthakhan decided they were ready to start a family, David says he “started to look for something that could be a career in Omaha to make a bunch of money and have a big house and all that kind of stuff.”

First selling cars, then working in insurance, David worked long hours and missed time with Amber and his two sons.

“When he was in the car business, he would work 12- to 13-hour days,” Amber says. “He’d be gone when the boys woke up, and, two days a week, the boys would be asleep before he got home. So he missed out on days.”

In insurance, the long hours included always being on call.

“I was finding myself miserable,” David says.

He started to wonder about bigger possibilities for his family.

“One weekend we were out camping, and we really loved camping,” David says. “I had been, I guess, soul-searching without really talking to Amber. And I asked her what she thought if we moved away and did something else.”

Amber says, “I’d been begging him to leave and move. I’d been having itchy feet to travel for a long time, so I was all for it. I said, ‘Absolutely. When do we leave? What are we going to do?’”

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Recalling his childhood dream of being a park ranger, David started looking into park ranger schools. “Being a ranger always had that appeal to me,” he says. “You stood for something. You were protecting something that we could destroy and never get back, and I wanted to be part of that.”

From a list of just seven academies, Parks Law Enforcement Academy in Mount Vernon, Wash., drew them in.

Though both were born and raised in the Midwest, David and Amber had always loved the Pacific Northwest. They were particularly attracted to Washington for its variety of landscapes and climates: trees, mountains, ocean and fresh water, deserts, and rainforests.

In January 2013, David began school. A few months later, Amber and the boys joined him, bringing only what they could fit in their pickup truck.

This was a leap of faith. “There wasn’t a guarantee of a job afterward,” Amber says.

“It’s a really competitive industry,” David explains. “So many people in the states have the same dream, want to be part of conserving and preserving. You’ve really got to stand out amongst so many people who are fighting for that same job.”

About three months into academy, Washington State Parks started recruiting from within the program. David was grateful and relieved to be one of approximately five cadets recruited.

Now the family lives in Lake Chelan State Park, Wash.

“This park sits on a huge lake that’s 52 miles long and 1,500 feet deep at its deepest point, which puts it below sea level,” David says. “The water is crystal clear, so you can see down 20 feet.”

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David spends much of his on-season time educating visitors on the park features.

“Sometimes I have to go into law enforcement mode and do things that a police officer would do,” David says. “But our park here is a little slower paced as far as that goes. A lot of families. So there’s not a whole lot of trouble, which makes it a really nice place to raise our kids.”

Jace, 5, and Kasen, 3 and a half, are very adventurous. They like to go on hikes, play with bugs, and play superheroes—in fact, Kasen will only respond to the name “Superman,” and even corrects Amber when she talks about him.

Amber stays home with the boys. In addition to enjoying the kids, she also gardens, repurposes furniture, does crafts, bakes, cooks, and “dinks around in a lot of different things.”

She writes and keeps up their blog: simplythewildside.com. This has been one major way they can keep their family, all of whom live in the Midwest, updated. “It’s really tough being far away from family and friends,” she says. “But it’s a great time to fall into ourselves, learn more about us, and develop in that way. We are, basically, all alone out here. We lean on each other a lot and are growing a lot as a little family, for sure.”

“I felt like my duty as a husband and father was to make a bunch of money and provide for my family. To make sure we had everything we felt would make us happy. TVs, going out to eat all the time,” David says. “I don’t make near as much money as I used to, but we have a better life, I feel.”

It’s a simple life. Their belongings still pretty much all fit into that pickup truck. They do have a TV for hooking up movies, but they rarely use it.

“It just feels more free,” David says.

“We’re not tied down to a schedule either,” Amber says. “We wake up, and if we just want to hang out all day, that’s what we do. There’s no time pressure.”

Time is exactly the thing David was missing out on before. “Living in the park, I have so much more time to spend with my kids and my wife,” he says. “I don’t have to commute, for one. I walk out, and I’m on the clock.”

His 15-minute breaks and his hour-long lunch breaks are spent at home. “It’s surprising how much time you get to spend with them just in those little bits,” he says.

They can’t imagine going back to a “regular life, back to the busy,” according to Amber. If state and federal funding allows it, David hopes to be a park ranger until he retires.

As for Washington, Amber says, “We’re not opposed to going somewhere else. But we do love it here.”

Exploring Omaha on Valentine’s Day

February 7, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Valentine’s Day is all about sharing the love and letting your spouse, your children, your friends—even your dog—know that you care.

But when it comes to Valentine’s Day celebrations, it can be a little difficult to share the wealth when you find yourself stuck in the stereotypical rut of chocolate, flowers, and the same dinner at your favorite restaurant every year.

Home to dozens of distinct neighborhoods, Omaha offers hidden gems that are waiting to be discovered, as well as classic landmarks that might be overlooked on Valentine’s Day.

Meghan Francis and Kerry Jones, founders of the Omaha-based blog Wise Owl + Sly Fox, brainstormed some unique Omaha Valentine’s Day activities.

“I guess we’ve always been old souls with old styles, and that’s one great thing about Omaha: There’s just so much history here,” says Francis.

Together, Francis and Jones came up with a Valentine’s Day “tour of Omaha.” Pick and choose from different activities to show loved ones a small portion of all the intimacy, history, and romance that Omaha has to offer.

Get your heart rate up in the morning with a walk or run with your loved one through the Field Club neighborhood. Located along an old railroad bend, the Field Club trail offers visitors a brief glimpse into a bygone era. Although you’ll have to bundle up, the sights of this secluded area include gorgeous ravines, snow-capped trees, and abandoned railroad tracks.

If your partner is a history buff, make a quick stop by the Gerald R. Ford Preservation Center near Hanscomb Park. An exhibition on Ford, the only president to have lived in Omaha, is open by appointment by calling the center’s main phone line at 402-595-1180. The exhibit is available for private viewing Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free of charge. The exhibit features photos of his birthplace, family memorabilia, and gifts given to Ford by world leaders and well-wishing locals.

For lunch, hop on over to Dundee, home to both casual and higher-end fare in an all-accessible setting. Stop by the French Bulldog for something on the trendier side or try Dundee Dell for classic comfort food from an Omaha staple. Both spaces offer comfortable opportunities to spend some time watching the eclectic crowd of Dundee.

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If you’re looking for an afternoon activity once the kids come home from school, Valentine’s Day crafts are an easy way to get the whole family involved. Francis and Jones suggest making homemade cards.

“We’re big fans of sending things through the mail. It’s just always a fun thing, and it’s something that we don’t do a lot in this day and age,” says Francis.

“Send them to your grandma, your single aunt, veterans at the VA hospital, whoever,” adds Jones.

For crafting supplies, head out to South-Central Omaha. David M. Mangelsen’s has been stocking Omaha’s crafting closets since 1961, and is an easy stop to find any Valentine’s Day-related arts and crafts supplies you could think of. A few hours coloring, gluing, and bedazzling might expose some hidden creativity among the family.

If you want to end your night with a more traditional Valentine’s Day celebration, spend the night in the Old Market, which is home to a host of restaurants that offer the quintessential romantic dinners by candlelight. Francis and Jones’ personal favorite is La Buvette, a French-style café and grocer.

For some after-dinner entertainment, look to the Omaha art scene. Many of the Old Market’s art galleries, including the Passageway Gallery and Anderson O’Brien Fine Art, are open until 9 p.m. on Fridays for some late-night shopping.

Although, after a whirlwind day around Omaha, you might want to hit the sack early.

Digital Immigrant, Meet Demand Generation

May 25, 2013 by

Chances are you are a “digital immigrant,” one who was not born bathed in bits, who played video games as a toddler or learned keyboarding in third grade. This means you have a steeper learning curve than “digital natives”—those for whom all this social media stuff isn’t stuff at all. It’s just part of everyday life…how they live, work, play, access information, and make decisions.

Indeed, there is a whole generation of digital natives, who command where, when, and how they find information. They are in control, and that is why they are called the “demand generation.” They compose our customers, our prospects, our employees, our constituents, and our advocates. A key to understanding social media is understanding how to reach, and more importantly, engage with the demand generation.

Here are some tips:

  • Acknowledge that the sales process is no longer linear. The internet has jumped squarely in between you and your customer and interrupted what used to be a good opportunity for you to control the conversation. Now consumers visit blogs to get information and recommendations on what to buy. The average consumer uses more than 10 sources to make a buying decision today, and 70 percent of Americans look at product reviews. What was once linear may be turned upside-down, twisted sideways, and backwards. Consumers may see a product in the store, but then go out into cyberspace to investigate it, only to go back into the store to buy.
  • Content is king. As a writer by trade—and a digital immigrant—knowing this makes me very happy. It also makes me work hard to relate to my target audience with personal, direct, relevant conversations that matter to them. Customers who engage with brands online spend 20-40 percent more on that brand’s products/services. Know your target. Understand their perspective. Quench their thirst for the knowledge they seek. A long time ago, author and speaker Bert Decker impressed me with his edict, “You’ve got to be believed to be heard.” Break through that frontal cortex, and your message just may get through.
  • You do have to be everywhere—and on-the-go. This seems the antithesis to target marketing, but what it means is you can’t think that because you have your website and a Facebook page, you’re good to go. Chances are your target customers aren’t sitting still. It’s likely—not statistically shown—that 78 percent of consumers shop across multiple channels. This means the internet—your site if your SEO is up to date, social media, Twitter, Vine, blogs, e-mail deliveries from you/your competitors, and their phones. And here’s the deal with phones: 31 percent of consumers research products on their phones before buying in-store while 40 percent research products from their phones before buying online. Is your site mobile optimized/responsive so that it feeds the information to fit the user’s screen?

The good news about all this—for those willing to keep swimming in the deep end—is that there is demand, a marketer’s dream. We can meet that demand with products people need and want—and by getting in and staying in the conversation with relevance, content, personalization, and engagement.

Special thanks for inspiration and sourcing for this article from Bob Thacker, former CMO of OfficeMax.