Tag Archives: B2B Magazine

Cybersecurity

May 16, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

It was a Black Friday story that had nothing to do with holiday bargains. In 2013, cyber criminals hacked into Target Corp.’s customer database and stole as many as 40 million credit card numbers. Customer names, credit and debit card numbers, expiration dates, and CVV codes were reportedly compromised, presumably so hackers could use the data to make new cards. 

Customers everywhere were affected.

Leaders at Minnesota-based Target were horrified and embarrassed as the hack made international news. Amid criticism that the company should have done more to protect consumers—and an investigation launched by authorities in Nebraska and nearly every other state—Target later implemented a $5 million cybersecurity coalition charged with preventing such breeches from happening again. The total cost of the cyberattack on Target reached as high as $300 million, according to news reports. That included class action lawsuit settlements and money paid to credit card companies, banks, and credit unions.

While the damage was done, the retailer wasn’t alone. The financial loss from cybercrimes surpassed $1.3 billion in 2016, according to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center. There were nearly 300,000 complaints to the agency that year from businesses of all sizes.

Such cybercrimes have put companies everywhere on high alert—and looking at what cybersecurity measures they have in place. 

That includes businesses in Omaha. 

“We have to ask, ‘How do we endure security of information, customer privacy, systems compliance, the website, power stations, and landfill?’” says Joshua Mauk, the Omaha Public Power District director of security, whose job includes cybersecurity. “Our job is to implement a security program that helps us achieve all of those objectives across all of the district.” 

“Cybersecurity” sounds like a buzzword, but it’s a real concern among companies and law enforcement officials. The FBI says cybercrimes are becoming “more commonplace, more dangerous, and more sophisticated.” The agency reports that hackers target companies like Target for data and trade secrets, universities for research, and consumers for money and identity theft.

Along with being a monetary hassle, work is often disrupted or stopped altogether at companies, hospitals, even 911 centers. The hackers range from disgruntled or thrill-seeking computer geeks to international terrorists and spies looking for money to fund their operations. Even a small attack is a potential threat to national security. 

Some attacks target hardware and software, such as malware. Others are online fraud and phishing schemes, while yet others are considered “sexploitation,” according to Interpol. 

FBI officials say they have begun partnering with companies and organizations around the country as part of its cyber division’s efforts to boost cybersecurity nationwide. 

OPPD is one of them. The utility is working with the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security to try and prevent cybercrimes at the utility. If hackers took down OPPD’s system, then every single customer—or 820,000 people—could, theoretically, lose power indefinitely.

Mauk declined to specify OPPD’s cyber security program, citing security reasons. Other companies, including First National Bank of Omaha, declined to comment due to safety concerns. 

“There have been a number of utilities around the world that have been targeted,” Mauk says. “The biggest risk to us is someone coming in and taking down the entire system. The FBI and Homeland Security let us know about new risks, new threats, and we use that information to ensure we are adjusting those concerns to our cybersecurity program.” 

Omaha police acknowledge that while cybercrimes tend to fall under federal jurisdiction, they would investigate a cybercrime that occurred in the city. But most of the time, cyber attacks are conducted by people located in other states or countries—not local hackers. 

Police say some companies may experience a cyberattack, but neglect to report it to law enforcement due to the idea that it might harm their image or reputation. 

The Nebraska Attorney General’s Office has a cybercrimes division aimed at protecting Nebraskans from technology crimes through education and, in some cases, legal action. 

Take the Target data breach. Last year, Attorney General Doug Peterson announced that Nebraska had joined 46 other states and the District of Columbia to reach an $18.5 million settlement against the retail giant stemming from the incident. The state received $199,382 as its share. 

Peterson had said it was the largest multi-state data breach settlement to date. 

In October, Peterson’s office released a statement promoting cybersecurity in the workplace: 

“As recent major cybersecurity incidents have shown, cybercriminals often rely on human error—like failing to install software patches, clicking on malicious links, and creating easy-to-guess passwords—to gain access to systems and information. Every member of an organization—from senior leadership to the newest employees—is responsible for keeping information and systems secure. The chain is only as strong as its weakest link. That’s why strong cybersecurity practices are so important.”

Authorities and security experts worry, though, that cybercrimes will continue and even increase as advances in technology are made. Officials and corporate security teams understand they have to stay two steps ahead, always. 

“This is definitely something we are investing in, from a people, processes, and technology standpoint,” Mauk says. “We will have additional layers of security to always protect the corporate side, critical infrastructure, and plants.” 


Visit the attorney general’s webpage, ago.nebraska.gov, for more information on cybersecurity.

This article was printed in the June/July 2018 edition of B2B. 

Joshua Mauk

Elman Print

Photography by Jeremy Wieczorek

This sponsored content was printed in the June/July 2018 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/bb0718_flipbook/28

Mark Elman, president of Elman Print, is happy to reveal the secret of Elman Print’s impressive success. “It has to be our staff,” he says, explaining that the reason they’ve enjoyed such great success for more than three decades in Omaha is largely due to an experienced, dedicated staff.

“They’re incredible people,” he says. Elman further explains that it’s the mix of the veteran employees with the younger staff that creates success. “It’s a good blend. The younger staff respects the experienced staff and is willing to learn, while the younger staff brings in the knowledge of new technology to help the veteran staff grow.”

Clients who turn to Elman Print benefit from the impressive roster of professionals on staff who utilize both experience and the latest technology to get the job done. In Elman’s eyes, every project is important­—large and small projects receive the same amount of attention to ensure consistent success. 

Elman’s graphic artists and prepress staff are in charge of reviewing the files to guarantee high resolution reproduction. “We make sure the hard work of graphic designers is brought to life accurately, by verifying bleeds, folds, and resolution, just to name a few.” says Elman. “We give our customers a sense of ease when we take over a project—it’s in capable hands”.  

The system works well for a busy company that is accustomed to helping customers with their printing needs. “Using the latest software and hardware, our prepress staff puts the final touches on projects before they hit the production floor,” says Elman.

6210 S. 118th St.
Omaha, NE 68137
402.346.0888
elmanprint.com

Creating a Development-Focused Culture

March 23, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

As Baby Boomers retire, organizations are left wondering who will take their place. Identifying who has the potential to take, for example, the COO’s place in five years can be a daunting task, but it’s a very important one. When organizations don’t make a plan beforehand, they find themselves stuck when the COO decides to retire or, worse, leaves suddenly.

The first step toward transition is to identify the vision for the organization’s future. This serves as a guiding framework for planning future talent.

Then create a culture focused on employee development. When you build this, your employees will be better prepared to take the next step in their career and to help achieve the organization’s vision. Employees also appreciate companies that invest in their growth, so it’s a win-win.

Examine the gap between the talent you have and the talent you need. To identify the talent you need, determine which competencies are critical for your organization. Which competencies will move the organization forward and bolster the culture? Is strategic ability important? Is collaboration?

Identify the talent you have. Get to know your people and their strengths—as well as their opportunities for development. Consider using high-quality psychological and cognitive assessments, multi-rater feedback, and behavior-based interviews. Using multiple methods gives you a more complete and accurate view of your employees’ strengths and weaknesses. 

Provide feedback to your employees. Where do their strengths lie? What areas could they work on? Then help employees put together a development plan. Meet with them monthly to touch base on the plan and provide guidance and mentoring. You may also want to consider establishing coaching services. Coaching can facilitate self-awareness, behavior change, and skill-building.

Once you have started a development-focused culture, you can focus on the nuts and bolts of succession planning. Identify who is leaving and when, who (based on their assessment results as well as your knowledge of their skills and career interests) could step in for each individual (keeping in mind that it might be a different successor for each), and what will be needed to develop that potential successor to ensure their success when the time for transition comes. 

Remember that communication is imperative. Communicate the purpose behind development activities such as assessments, development plans, and coaching. Employees with this understanding will be more receptive. Also ensure that you fully communicate the organization’s vision for the future and employees’ place in it. Communicating this information will help employees better understand their path and build excitement around the vision.

Lauren Weivoda, M.A., is a​ ​human​ ​capital​ ​strategist​​ at Solve Consulting LLC.

This article was printed in the April/May 2018 edition of B2B.

Taxes Will Not Be The Death Of You

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Accounting firm Lacey & Associates has been around plenty long. Not nearly as long, though, as the document that hangs on its office reception wall—a 1913 Federal Form 1040 Income Tax Return.

That’s the first return issued following passage of the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which allowed Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the U.S. Census.

The return is a mere two pages long. Figuring taxable income required completion of seven lines. Seven more lines were needed to figure all deductions.

“There wasn’t much to it,” Doug Lacey says with a chuckle.

Not exactly the case more than a century later. Over the years, tax rates have risen and tax forms have grown more numerous and complicated. To the delight of many (and chagrin of many others), Congress and President Donald Trump addressed that last December with passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, one of the most far-reaching tax reform bills ever.

Doug, president of Lacey & Associates and an accountant since the 1970s, has never seen anything like it.

“It’s about as large of a change as I can remember,” he says. “There’s a lot to it, both looking at it from individual tax returns and business tax returns. Every year there would be some small changes…but nothing as big in scope as what we have starting in 2018.”

While the changes seem likely to make filing tax returns easier for the majority of individuals, they also might call for more guidance for businesses. In fact, it might cause some companies to change their very filing status.

“It gives us the opportunity to do a lot of tax planning and meet with the clients more than we probably would have,” Doug says. “To talk to them about how these changes affect them and whether to do anything different.”

With these many changes, some may worry about being audited, but accountant Scott Lacey says business owners, especially small business owners, can relax.

“There could be even fewer audits because they have simplified the tax code,” Scott says. “And typically the IRS doesn’t audit small businesses.”

Lacey’s firm has roots to the 1940s when his father, George, began providing bookkeeping and tax services part time. Doug joined him in 1977. In 1991 he began Lacey & Associates. His son, Scott, joined the firm in 2005 and is happy to be part of the family-run company.

“I realized I’m going to get more pride out of providing this service than I will staying at a large corporation,” says Scott, who previously worked in finance at First Data Corp. “The thing that I like the most about the shift is, in a smaller company, you have to have your hands in all the pots, you have to deal with the computer company, you have to pay the bills, you have to make the coffee, you have to do everything. I feel like I’m making more of an impact, but you also don’t have typical 9-5 hours, so you’re working nights and weekends quite a bit.”

Located in Ralston, the company will file 2017 returns for about 1,200 individuals and 150 businesses.

“I still get to work with some of George’s clients, or their children,” Scott says. “It’s kind of an honor.”

The Laceys have waded through multiple tax changes. They say the most important thing to know about the 2018 tax changes is that not everything is known.

The Laceys have done all they can to understand the changes, reviewing the bill, listening to online podcasts from tax experts, and reading summaries published in various industry newsletters and periodicals.

“There are certain things that even people running the webinars don’t understand or say we have to wait and see some more examples of how this works,” Doug says. “We’ll have to look at it and see the ramifications of all the different changes.”

Scott says the company will continue to keep on top of the changes.

“Sometimes the [government] adjusts the new laws throughout the year. I fully expect to see some adjustments throughout this summer and fall.”

That said, Doug expects several of the changes to have significant impact. For businesses, he points first to drops in the tax rate.

For C corporations, which pay income tax, rates drop from a high of 35 percent to a flat rate of 21 percent. “That’s why you’re seeing the stock market doing so well and seeing some corporations bring some of their different locations out of Europe, Africa, and South America back to the United States,” Doug says. “They figured out what it’s going to save them, and they’re trying to bring it back to the United States.”

For S corporations, which pass corporate income, losses, deductions, and credits through to their shareholders, the tax rate drops to a flat 20 percent.

The changes, Doug says, might lead some of his clients to switch from a C-corp. to an S-corp. “Or vice versa,” he adds.

Also of significance, Doug says, is a change to equipment write offs. Previously, that came to 50 percent of what the equipment cost. That’s been changed to 100 percent of the cost.

For individuals, Doug cites several changes as most important:

A drop in all tax brackets and new withholding tables.

A raise in the standard deduction for married couples filing a joint return from $12,700 to $24,000. That change alone, Doug says, is likely to lead most people to forgo itemizing deductions as in most cases they won’t exceed $24,000. “The IRS anticipates that people using the itemized deductions will go from 30 to 10 percent.”

The $4,150 personal exemption is being eliminated.

An increase in the child tax credit from $1,000 to $2,000 per child. The amount of the credit that is refundable increases to $1,400.

For now, the Laceys and their team are focused on handling the rush of 2017 returns. Lacey & Associates will work round the clock to make sure clients receive the best service possible.

But though definite answers won’t come until later this year, he knows the questions will come now.

“The clients are going to come in and say, ‘How does this new tax law affect my income tax?’” Doug says. “We’re going to tell them a few things, but there’s quite a few complex issues here, especially in the business area, that we can’t really say right off the top of our head how it’s going to affect them.”

From left: Scott and Doug Lacey

This article was printed in the April/May 2018 edition of B2B.

Valmont Industries Inc.

October 6, 2017 by

This sponsored content appeared in the Fall 2017 edition of B2B. To view, click here: https://issuu.com/omahapublications/docs/bb1117_final_flipbook/42

Global Leadership Grown from Midwestern Roots

Like most great companies, Valmont began with one person who had a vision, an entrepreneurial spirit, and a strong desire to create something of lasting value. So strong was that desire, he put his life savings—$5,000—on the line. That man was Robert B. “Bob” Daugherty.

In 1946, following the war, Frank Daugherty (Bob’s uncle and mentor) encouraged Bob to consider business opportunities. Bob took his uncle’s advice, investing in a farm machine shop in Valley, Nebraska. From those humble beginnings grew Valmont. The company leads the world in the five primary business segments: engineered support structures, coatings, irrigation, utility support structures, and energy and mining. Valmont conducts business in over 100 countries, and its 10,000 employees operate from facilities in more than 23 different countries. Valmont is publicly traded on the NYSE under the symbol (VMI).

Making a Difference Every Day

Valmont creates ever-improving lighting and traffic structures to guide the way, communications towers that keep people connected, utility structures that bring power to homes and businesses, and irrigation equipment that helps grow the food to feed a growing world population.

If you’ve driven under the lights of the Dodge Street expressway, been to a game at TD Ameritrade Park, or noticed a Valley Irrigation center pivot irrigating a field, Valmont has touched your life. Valmont’s products can be found on the Golden Gate Bridge, Chicago’s Navy Pier, Daytona International Speedway, the Copenhagen Opera House, and Singapore’s Garden by the Bay.

Valmont touches billions of people around the world every day. According to the International Energy Agency, 1.2 billion people don’t have access to electricity. Valmont is helping to design and build the infrastructure that will bring it to them. The United Nations reports that by 2050, the world’s population is expected to reach 9.6 billion people. Valmont is at the forefront, helping ag producers manage the finite fresh water supply required to feed the world’s growing population.

A Steel Company Focused on People

Valmont’s culture places a premium on its employees having passion for its products. All 10,000-plus members of the global Valmont family pride themselves on being people of integrity who excel at delivering results. With nearly 30 percent of all promotions coming from within, employees at every level have opportunities to take their careers in any direction and to nearly any place in the world.

According to Valmont Utility Engineer Barbara Cunningham, “You can learn about yourself and fine-tune your professional goals at Valmont. Some people start in one field, then find that their passion is in one of the other departments. Valmont will foster and encourage this type of growth.”

Valmont’s Midwestern roots continue to move the company forward. Dig deeper, and one will find those roots are the people who comprise Valmont and the culture that unites them.

1 Valmont Plaza
Omaha, NE 68154
402.963.1000
valmont.com

From The Editor

February 23, 2017 by

B2B Magazine started 2017 by highlighting the many successful women in business around Omaha, and this issue, we bring you the best of the city for business needs.

This contest is a bit different from the Best of Omaha, where the ballot is published online so anyone in the community can choose their favorites. In the Best of B2B contest, the winners are nominated on ballots printed in the 20,000 copies of the winter issue. Each issue of the magazine contained a ballot—a chance for readers to vote on favorite businesses that cater to the local business community (for example: business lunch, carpet cleaning, and much more).

How many of us can truly say we love our work? I do, actually. I look forward to coming to the office. A big part of this is that I work with an incredible team of creatives and salespeople, and one lizard. Yes, lizard—Spike the bearded dragon. Spike came to visit a couple of years ago when the publisher and his family left for Europe, and he has been with us since. He’s docile, usually sitting under his heat lamp hanging around. Sometimes when I am really feeling overwhelmed, I walk downstairs to his aquarium and watch him for a moment, sunning himself, enjoying life.

In the spring issue, we bring you the story of Envoy, which keep cats, dogs, and even a hedgehog in the office. Employees keep treats for the fur-ployees at their desks, and if one of the pets turns up missing, the whole office helps in finding their special friend.

What about you? Do you have a pet in your office? Does your office allow you to bring your pets to work? Or do you vote nay to keeping or having pets in the office? Does the fur or the smell bother you? Follow us on social media and join the conversation (@omahamagazine on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram).

We also have other incredible articles in this issue. Like many forms of traditional media, radio is looking for alternate ways to increase revenue. NRG Media has found new business opportunities through concerts.

Ride-sharing has become a popular trend in the past several years. While people are more prone to call for an Uber in a coastal city where the cost of owning a car is prohibitive, Omaha does offer alternatives to jumping into your own vehicle when you want to go somewhere. One of those alternatives is Zipcar. This car-sharing service allows users to access one of several fleet vehicles in the area by reserving a time and date for a car. The vehicle is then available for the reserver to use by the hour or the day.

And if you need to go outside of the city, traveling to Silicon Valley just became a bit easier by flying on United Airlines’ nonstop flights between Omaha and San Francisco.

This issue of B2B, like all issues, proves to be an adventure. I hope you enjoy it.

Daisy Hutzell-Rodman is associate editor of B2B, a publication of Omaha Magazine LTD. She can be reached at daisy@omahamagazine.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This letter was printed in the Spring 2017 edition of B2B.

 

The Catholic Issue

February 21, 2017 by

The March/April issue of Omaha Magazine hits the streets just as Oscar season comes to a close. Meanwhile, the subject of Omaha’s best-known Oscar-winning story is up for an even greater recognition—sainthood. A tribunal from the Vatican is currently scrutinizing Boys Town’s founder, the late Father Edward J. Flanagan, for canonization.

Boys Town (the movie) tells a fictionalized story of the real-life Father Flanagan. Released in 1938, the movie was actually filmed on the grounds of Boys Town. Spencer Tracy won the Academy Award for Best Actor with his portrayal of Father Flanagan, and Tracy’s Oscar sits in a protective case at the Boys Town Hall of History.

The Village of Boys Town was engulfed by Omaha’s westward sprawl. But Boys Town itself has grown significantly, too, with satellite locations throughout the metro (and nationwide). This year, Boys Town enters its 100th year of operation.

Should Pope Francis designate Father Flanagan to be a saint, the Village of Boys Town would become a place of holy pilgrimage. Add that to Omaha’s list of annual pilgrimages (a cherry—or maybe “halo” would be a better word—on top of Berkshire Hathaway’s annual shareholder meeting and the College World Series).

Although Father Flanagan’s earthly remains now rest in a tomb adjoining Dowd Chapel on campus, if he is canonized a saint, the village would need a shrine to accommodate the throngs of devout pilgrims (to avoid disrupting the normally calm chapel that was designed by local Omaha architect Leo A. Daly according to Father Flanagan’s own instructions).

Omaha Magazine’s March/April cover story tells the tale of Father Flanagan’s life and his ongoing canonization process. With St. Patrick’s Day, Lent, and Easter taking place during this issue’s distribution period, the magazine has taken on a noticeably Catholic theme.

There is a guide to Omaha’s St. Patrick’s Day bar crawl, a guide to six of the best Lenten fish fries, and a story about the mysterious stained glass windows of St. Mary Magdalene Church (which was also designed by Omaha architect Leo A. Daly).

The cover story’s author, Carol Crissey Nigrelli, converted to Catholicism one year ago on Easter. She has become the magazine’s go-to writer for all subjects Catholic. Nigrelli wrote about the last nuns of Duchesne Academy in the September/October 2016 issue. She also profiled the University of Notre Dame’s president in “From Omaha to Notre Dame” for the cover story of our November/December 2015 issue.

Omaha Magazine’s 35th Anniversary

A publication titled Omaha Magazine has existed in Omaha since the 19th century. The earliest version, according to publisher Todd Lemke, was published in 1890. It was a satirical newsprint publication in magazine format, he says.

Lemke entered Omaha publishing in March 1983 with the first issue of City Slicker, the precursor to his current Omaha Magazine. This March issue of Omaha Magazine marks the 35th anniversary of Lemke’s career in magazine publishing. That history explains why Omaha Magazine’s issue numbering starts with No. 1 in March.

When CitySlicker was initially in distribution, another Omaha Magazine was on the streets. Lemke says the previous Omaha Magazine—no relation to the current magazine—started in the 1970s and folded a few years after he had entered the local media market.

The Omaha Magazine brand name came available in the late 1980s. Lemke secured the copyright, and the first issue of his Omaha Magazine came out in 1989. The rest is history.

Today, Omaha Magazine Ltd. is the parent company of Omaha Publications, which also produces several other local community-focused magazines such as Encounter, B2B Magazine, Omaha Magazine’s Family Guide, and assorted custom publishing products.

For 35 years, Lemke’s Omaha Magazine (previously known as City Slicker) has told the stories of Omaha people, culture, and events. Thanks for reading!