Tag Archives: award

10,000 Ideas in 10,000 Square Feet

March 3, 2016 by
Photography by Thomas Grady

From confined, concise rooms to open, flowing spaces…this 10,000 square foot home has been completely transformed. The foundation and exterior frame remain, but the entire interior has been reconstructed. New floor plans were created within these constraints based upon the homeowner’s needs, desires, and existing furnishings. Along with builder Choice Homes, architect Ron Hackett, and the homeowner, we worked together to reconstruct this home into a modern take on a natural and rustic-inspired design with hints of old world tradition. Not one detail was overlooked.

Hand-scraped wood floors and beams invite guests into the entry and move throughout the entire home. The curved staircase with custom ironwork, glass accents, and tile- detailed risers flow through the three levels.

The great room ceiling was raised to the second floor and larger windows were installed to open the home. A two-sided stone fireplace with a floating limestone hearth opens the great room to the hearth room and raises the eye to the exposed distressed beams. An additional roof was integrated to incorporate a covered back patio where a built-in bar, grill, and fireplace formed an outdoor living area.

A color palate composed of rich copper, red, turquoise, and mink streams throughout the home. Bronze plumbing and lighting selections were made to compliment these tones and add touches of timeless charm.

The stone encasing the dining room and kitchen range wall, along with custom wall finishes, add warmth to the space. A distinctive bar-height and angle within the kitchen island inspired unique granite and stone selections. Pedants with hammered amber glass and metal detail in combination with an antique mirror backsplash are featured in the dinette to add a tinge of an old world feel.

Just beyond the great room a striking powder bath uses Backdraft granite that continues from the counter to the ceiling. The drama continues with the unique starburst wall details and pebble floor.

The master bathroom and bedroom are still contained in traditional elements but with a hint of flair. The lavish master bath features custom cabinetry, wall finishes, and tile designs. Marble tile with glass detail flows up the entire whirlpool wall. Polished nickel, quartz, and artistic glass features add bling, taking the space to the next level of richness.
A custom-designed curved theater room barn door welcomes friends to a spacious and entertaining lower level. Rustic stone walls set the tone in the bar and family room. The wine cellar boasts a custom iron door and soft, glowing, back-lit onyx counters. The rustic undertones continue into the powder bath with a glass tile floor, mirrored cabinetry, and hand-created wall texture.

This remodeled open floor plan with more than adequate circulation space and custom finishes allows the homeowner to live conveniently and entertain with ease.

The 2015 NE-IA ASID Project Awards presented this home a Silver Award.

Visit idfomaha.com to learn more.

Kirk Vaughn-Robinson

December 18, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

After a lifetime in the performing arts that culminated in 12 years on the road with the blockbuster Broadway touring production of The Phantom of the Opera in the roles of Lefevre and the Fire Chief, Kirk Vaughn-Robinson had come to learn more than a little bit about stagecraft.

But few scenes were as amateurishly staged as the one that played out in his hotel room almost every night in the latter years of his musical theatre career.

“I had this wobbly collapsible table I bought for $20 at Walgreens, a rickety foldable chair, a simple clamp light, and a lazy susan,” says the Muncie, Ind., native who later grew up on a horse farm in Florida. “It was just all so totally absurd.”

Outside of his Broadway gig, the triple threat singer-actor-dancer had performed with the Cincinnati Opera, Dayton Opera, Sorg & Whitewater Opera companies, and the Cincinnati Pops, all after attending the famed American Institute of Musical Studies in Graz, Austria.

But Kirk Vaughn-Robinson was now learning a new artform. Carting his curious ensemble of new “props” from town to town, he was teaching himself to become a sculptor.

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“It’s only fitting that I have established my first studio here in Council Bluffs,” Vaughn-Robinson says from the surprisingly spacious 1,100-square-foot space in the Harvester Artspace Lofts that has been his live/work home for over a year, “because my sculpting career began when Phantom was here in 2008. I executed my first work here.”

Things moved fast, he says, once he mustered the courage to show his work and the owner of the very first gallery he visited signed the novice sculptor on the spot.

Now venturing increasingly into abstract castings, Vaughn-Robinson is perhaps best known for his exquisitely crafted figurative bronzes of men, horses, mermen and, yes, even dorsal fin-sporting “merhorses.”

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Exhibiting a visual language of sensual romanticism, he renders classic ideals of beauty in timeless archetypes that speak to themes that are at once natural and organic, theatrical, and dramatic.

Vaughn-Robinson continues performing in a more localized, scaled-down slate of opera and musical appearances. He recently played the role of Pish-Tush in the Opera Omaha production of The Mikado and was nominated for an Omaha Entertainment and Arts Award for his work in The Sound of Music at The Rose.

Vaughn-Robinson won’t rule out the idea of returning to a big touring production, but for now is happy to sculpt away in Council Bluffs as his gallery representation and commission business grows.

His two worlds—the stage and the studio—offer a stark contrast in workplace experiences.

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“Just as being a part of a huge touring company is a decidedly social affair,” he explains, “sculpting is instead very solitary. It is a meditative time for me. My most common experience in all those hotel rooms over the years was that I would be lost in my work and, thinking that maybe a half hour had gone by, I’d suddenly realize that dawn was breaking. It is a spiritual experience for me, and I like to think that this is reflected in my bronzes.”