Tag Archives: Anderson O’Brien Fine Art

May/June 2018 Exhibits Calendar

April 27, 2018 by
Photography by provided

Art & Museum Exhibits

BFA & BASA Thesis and Senior Shows
Through May 5 at UNO Criss Library and Weber Art Gallery, 6001 Dodge St. Thesis students in the art gallery and BASA graduating seniors from UNO showcase their work. Admission: free. 402-554-3206.
unomaha.edu

Word/Play: Prints, Photographs, and Paintings by Ed Ruscha
Through May 6 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. The first major exhibition featuring Ruscha in his home state of Nebraska, Word/Play brings together prints, photographs, and artist books, complemented by a selection of major paintings. Ruscha’s use of the written word is a signature element of his work. Tickets: $10 ($5 from 4-8 p.m. Thursdays), $5 students with valid ID, free to members and youths 17 and under. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org

Metamorphosis: Works by Sayaka Ganz and Aurora Robson
Through May 13 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This exhibit is constructed of found, recycled, and reused plastic objects. Equal parts artistic and educational, it will feature fine art accompanied by a message of environmental stewardship. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

beginning.break.rapid: Kenji Fujita & Barbara Takenaga
Through June 2 at Bemis Center, 742 S. 12th St. These artists use a variety of mediums including vinyl, paint, spray paint, gesso, paper, calcium carbonate, wood, plywood, and linen. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying
Through June 2 at Bemis Center, 742 S. 12th St. The artists in this exhibit examine how support for the body in states of illness and rest prompts us to re-imagine the world collectively. The exhibit aims to bring attention to how the body is articulated in capitalism and health-related discourse. Admission: free. 402-341-7130.
bemiscenter.org

Widespread Flowering
Through June 4 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. Motivated by the beauty and passage of time, space, and geometry of the world of nature, Ann Brugenhemke explores life and love through art. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Wedes
Through June 4 at Darger HQ, 1804 Vinton St. Artists Angela Simione and Sarah Rowe are inspired by traditional craft. Their work embodies illustrations of everyday objects as metaphors of self-identity, boundaries, and protection. Admission: free. 402-209-5554.
dargerhq.org

Tuskeegee Airmen: Who Called Nebraska Home
Through June 30 at Great Plains Black History Museum, 2221 N. 24th St. (Jewell Building). The exhibit will highlight photos, historical information, and artifacts about the Tuskeegee Airmen who called Nebraska home. Admission: free. 402-932-5554
gpblackhistorymuseum.org

Wearable Art—Kiss of the Wolf
May 3-6 at Anderson O’Brien Art, 1108 Jackson St. Artist Lori Bacigalupi explores different techniques in fabric design, such as screen process, natural dyeing, and mono-printing in wearable art. Admission: free. 402-884-0911.
aobfineart.com

Awakening
Starting May 4 at Omaha Artists’ Co-op, 405 S. 11th St. Enjoy works of art by Jasmine Greenwaldt, Alan Smith, and George Skuodas. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Salon Time: Sonya Clark + Althea Murphy-Price + Nontsikelelo Mutiti
May 4-June 30 at The Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 North 24th St. Salon Time features three artists who examine and celebrate the ritual time and material culture surrounding black women’s hair care. Admission: free. 402-933-3161.
u-ca.org

Missouri Valley Impressionist Society
May 11-June 30 at Gallery 1516, 1516 Leavenworth St. This national juried exhibition features pieces from the Missouri Valley Impressionist Society, a painting group striving to bring impressionism throughout the Missouri River Valley Region. Admission: free. 402-305-1510.
gallery1516.org

Amy Haney
Starting May 25 at Fred Simon Gallery, 1004 Farnman St. An Omaha native, Haney has practiced her artwork in several U.S. cities. Currently a professor in the college of communication, fine arts, and media at UNO, she is excited to share her printmaking pieces. Admission: free. 402-595-2122.
artscouncil.nebraska.gov

Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle: Secrets of the Sewer
Starting May 26 at Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St. Leap to the rescue and learn teamwork, collaboration, and problem-solving through puzzles, mazes, and obstacles just like Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Donatello. Also showing at this time is: Children’s China: Celebrating Culture, Character, and Confucius. Admission: $12 adults and kids, $11 seniors, free for children under 2 and members. 402-342-6164.
ocm.org

Reality
Starting June 1 at KANEKO, 1111 Jones St. Reality will dissect the notion of truth, history, and the presentation of what is “real.” This exhibit will investigate art, science, and technology that creates, alters, and reflects upon the sense of real. Admission: free. 402-341-3800.
thekaneko.org

The Eye Perceives
Starting June 1 at Artists Co-op, 405 S. 11th St. View works by Richard Markoff, Gabriella Quiroz, and Duane Adams. Admission: free. 402-342-9617.
artistscoopomaha.com

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection
Starting June 2 at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Take a look at 50 masterworks from one of the most private collections of British painting in the U.S. Tickets: $10 adults ($5 on Thursday 4-8 p.m.), $5 college students, free for Joslyn members and ages 17 and younger. 402-342-3300.
joslyn.org   

Patriotic Perches
Starting June 20 at Lauritzen Gardens, 100 Bancroft St. This exhibit features a collection of 51 handcrafted birdhouses by Richard Yost. Yost combines art, geography, and horticulture to educate visitors about state birds and flowers. Each birdhouse is decorated with knick-knacks that represent each state. Admission: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, free for garden members and children under 6. 402-346-4002.
lauritzengardens.org

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African-American Experiences in World War II
Through July 15 at Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St. This exhibit features artifacts, photographs, and oral histories to highlight some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African-Americans during World War II, both overseas and at home. Admission: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $7 children (3-12), and free to children age 2 and under and members. 402-444-5071.
durhammuseum.org


Event times and details may change. Check with venue or event organizer to confirm.

Art Farm

April 27, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Artist Cassia Kite has lived on the Gulf Coast of the Sunshine State for more than a decade, but her work remains rooted in the family farm near Auburn, Nebraska.

“I’m just so thankful of my upbringing. I love Nebraska,” Kite says. “I love the farm life. That’s probably the one reason why I’m constantly creating about it. I’m just homesick. I miss home.”

Her latest project, “Soundstitches,” captures the vibrant colors of her family farm in what Kite describes as an interdisciplinary, multimedia installation, and performance piece. Inspired by folk art, Kite created embroidered farm scenes. She then translated those images to music by assigning a musical note to each color, mapping out the music from left-to-right and top-to-bottom. The work leaves vast room for interpretation for the artists who engage with it.

This summer, Kite’s project will be featured at KANEKO as part of the fourth annual Under the Radar Festival (July 5-8). Her embroidery will be on display while the corresponding music is performed by professional musicians and a dancer. Festival director Amanda DeBoer Bartlett is excited to bring artists together to interpret Kite’s work, and she explains the piece will be presented in a way that is immersive so “the audience can walk around and experience the performance.”

“Since her piece is so open and improvisation-based, there won’t be a huge rehearsal process,” Bartlett says.

On its face, this project might seem a little outside Kite’s wheelhouse. She studied painting and sculpting in college and isn’t comfortable calling herself a folk artist, even though she loves folk art traditions. She took piano lessons for a short time as a child, and she played percussion instruments in a middle school band, but she doesn’t consider herself a musician. When it comes to “Soundstitches,” she says she’s more of a “translator” than a composer, converting colors into sound.

“It makes me feel very vulnerable in a way, too, and I think that’s good for growth,” Kite says. “This is about as honest a form as I’ll ever get.”

The project may be out of her comfort zone, but it’s also built on what she knows best—the rich hues and homespun imagery of Nebraska.

“Everything I create is a personal narrative,” she says.

Kite is an arts educator who teaches at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, but she returns to Nebraska during the summer months. Her work is on display at Anderson O’Brien Fine Art, and she’ll have a solo exhibition at the Schoolhouse Art Gallery in Brownville, Nebraska, starting in June. For Under the Radar, she’ll be one of several Nebraska-connected artists participating in the festival this summer. Bartlett explains that out of 30 to 40 acts each year, they try to reserve at least half of those spots for artists with ties to the state.

Kite is excited to have her work presented at KANEKO, especially in collaboration with Under the Radar. “I could not think of a better platform for this to happen,” she says, “because it really unifies the whole subject of the work.”

Visit cassiakite.com for more information.

This article was printed in the May/June 2017 edition of Omaha Magazine.

An Expressionistic Representationalist Take on Dirtbags

March 16, 2016 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Stephen Dinsmore was meant to be a painter. It just took him about three decades to be at peace with that fact of his life.

“I was not one of those kids who thought of being an artist or had anything to do with it really,” Dinsmore, 63, says from his Lincoln studio. “The art kids always seemed a little bit out there to me. So I went in a different direction.”

The Omaha native went corporate out of college despite becoming hooked on paint and canvas at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. But as Dinsmore began accumulating stuff and status through his steady 9-to-5 as a technical writer, the urge to paint only intensified, which took a toll on
his happiness.

“I finally said one day, ‘I’m either going to die the most unhappy, corporate, schlemiel writer in the world or I’m going to start painting,’” Dinsmore says.

StephenDinsmore2

At 32, he quit his job, sold his house, and moved to New York City where he painted by night and handled Francis Bacon and Mark Rothko paintings by day. Indeed, it was during this period of Dinsmore’s life—in a warehouse next door to the famous Marlborough Gallery—where the self-described “expressionistic representationalist” says he developed his style and craft.

“I just kept at it and kept at it and I got better and felt stronger and more confident. I started showing and started selling and it started to take hold and I quit my day jobs after five years,” Dinsmore says.

He hasn’t had another job since.

“The key is, the real measure is, if you’ve got that flame that doesn’t go out—that’s really what’s required, that’s what’s going to drive you on through the whole thing,” Dinsmore says, describing how he’s battled artistic setbacks and self-doubt throughout his career. “But without that, it’s unlikely you’ll make it.”

Dinsmore’s style is a polygamous marriage between Expressionism, Americana, and Ashcan art. It’s Norman Rockwell minus the warm fuzzies; Edward Hopper without corrective lenses. There’s a meditativeness and vitality to his soulful landscapes and still lifes. And his baseball paintings drip with mythos and nostalgia.

“There’s such a poetry to the game: the beauty of the field, the ironwork of the stadiums, uniforms, of course, and some of the insignias,” he says. “It’s all really quite beautiful to me. Yet there’s an ennui to it—there’s an emotional pull.”

The artist’s gritty, sometimes bleak depictions of America’s national pastime, he says, can be found most summers at Anderson O’Brien Fine Art during the College World Series. Dinsmore is also represented by Modern Arts Midtown and is a regular at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, among the plethora of galleries that represent him nationally.

Although validating, showing art will never define his career, Dinsmore says.

“If I never sold another painting again and that was the end of it, I’d still be painting,” he says. “It’s something that, when it works, is just so deeply satisfying to me.”

StephenDinsmore1

Exploring Omaha on Valentine’s Day

February 7, 2014 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Valentine’s Day is all about sharing the love and letting your spouse, your children, your friends—even your dog—know that you care.

But when it comes to Valentine’s Day celebrations, it can be a little difficult to share the wealth when you find yourself stuck in the stereotypical rut of chocolate, flowers, and the same dinner at your favorite restaurant every year.

Home to dozens of distinct neighborhoods, Omaha offers hidden gems that are waiting to be discovered, as well as classic landmarks that might be overlooked on Valentine’s Day.

Meghan Francis and Kerry Jones, founders of the Omaha-based blog Wise Owl + Sly Fox, brainstormed some unique Omaha Valentine’s Day activities.

“I guess we’ve always been old souls with old styles, and that’s one great thing about Omaha: There’s just so much history here,” says Francis.

Together, Francis and Jones came up with a Valentine’s Day “tour of Omaha.” Pick and choose from different activities to show loved ones a small portion of all the intimacy, history, and romance that Omaha has to offer.

Get your heart rate up in the morning with a walk or run with your loved one through the Field Club neighborhood. Located along an old railroad bend, the Field Club trail offers visitors a brief glimpse into a bygone era. Although you’ll have to bundle up, the sights of this secluded area include gorgeous ravines, snow-capped trees, and abandoned railroad tracks.

If your partner is a history buff, make a quick stop by the Gerald R. Ford Preservation Center near Hanscomb Park. An exhibition on Ford, the only president to have lived in Omaha, is open by appointment by calling the center’s main phone line at 402-595-1180. The exhibit is available for private viewing Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free of charge. The exhibit features photos of his birthplace, family memorabilia, and gifts given to Ford by world leaders and well-wishing locals.

For lunch, hop on over to Dundee, home to both casual and higher-end fare in an all-accessible setting. Stop by the French Bulldog for something on the trendier side or try Dundee Dell for classic comfort food from an Omaha staple. Both spaces offer comfortable opportunities to spend some time watching the eclectic crowd of Dundee.

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If you’re looking for an afternoon activity once the kids come home from school, Valentine’s Day crafts are an easy way to get the whole family involved. Francis and Jones suggest making homemade cards.

“We’re big fans of sending things through the mail. It’s just always a fun thing, and it’s something that we don’t do a lot in this day and age,” says Francis.

“Send them to your grandma, your single aunt, veterans at the VA hospital, whoever,” adds Jones.

For crafting supplies, head out to South-Central Omaha. David M. Mangelsen’s has been stocking Omaha’s crafting closets since 1961, and is an easy stop to find any Valentine’s Day-related arts and crafts supplies you could think of. A few hours coloring, gluing, and bedazzling might expose some hidden creativity among the family.

If you want to end your night with a more traditional Valentine’s Day celebration, spend the night in the Old Market, which is home to a host of restaurants that offer the quintessential romantic dinners by candlelight. Francis and Jones’ personal favorite is La Buvette, a French-style café and grocer.

For some after-dinner entertainment, look to the Omaha art scene. Many of the Old Market’s art galleries, including the Passageway Gallery and Anderson O’Brien Fine Art, are open until 9 p.m. on Fridays for some late-night shopping.

Although, after a whirlwind day around Omaha, you might want to hit the sack early.

Jo Anderson

December 25, 2012 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Jo Anderson adores Midlands art, and she loves showcasing the talent of those who create it.

Anderson is founder and owner of Anderson O’Brien Fine Art, an upscale art dealer and gallery that has been a fixture of Countryside Village at 87th and Pacific streets for more than three decades. Two years ago, she opened a second location in Omaha’s Old Market.

“I always had my eye on it,” Anderson says of the space at 1108 Jackson St., which housed Jackson Artworks for nearly 18 years. “Wouldn’t it be great to have a gallery downtown and have a broader audience?”

When the owners of Jackson Artworks announced they were closing, Anderson stepped in and took over the space in summer 2010. It’s since become one of downtown’s leading galleries.

The gallery in the Old Market has a different energy, audience, and atmosphere than the one in Countryside Village, says Anderson. Housed in a former warehouse, the downtown space is sleek and contemporary with white walls, exposed ductwork, concrete floors, and an open, airy feel. It’s also larger, so viewers have more room to get further back from the work and admire each piece fully, whether it’s an oil painting or sculpture.

Anderson’s gallery represents about 60 artists from Nebraska and surrounding states. Many are professional artists and art educators from area universities and colleges. Anderson says she prefers to represent established artists rather than up-and-coming talent.

“We have a consistency of work that is solid,” she says.

“Every day is different. It’s very rewarding. It’s just a great life.”

Keeping the number at a manageable 60 allows Anderson and her staff to give artists the time, attention, and resources they need. She takes great joy from being around art all day. “You’re dealing in beauty,” she says.

Anderson’s love of art goes back to childhood. She often accompanied her physician father to Indian reservations, where he treated patients. The visits sparked an interest in ethnographic art. Years later, Anderson opened the Plains Gallery at 78th and West Dodge Road, which she operated for more than a decade before selling it.

She then opened a poster gallery/frame shop near 76th and Pacific streets with business partner Sharon O’Brien. They didn’t have enough money to invest in original art, so they sold poster art.

In the early 1980s, the duo launched Anderson O’Brien Gallery in Countryside Village. They started out slow by representing a few artists, building clients, and upgrading their art collection. By the early ‘90s, O’Brien had gone on to pursue other ventures, leaving Anderson as sole owner.

As gallery owner, she has a variety of responsibilities. She meets with artists to discuss details of current and future exhibits, including determining how many pieces to feature and choosing an image for the event invitation. Other duties include handling bookwork, waiting on customers, and scheduling delivery and pick-up of artwork.

The gallery sells artwork to a mix of customers, from businesses to private collectors. It offers shipping, framing, hanging, appraisals, and other services. Anderson also works with interior designers and architects to place art in homes, offices, and other spaces.

“Every day is different,” she says. “It’s very rewarding. It’s just a great life.”

For more information on the gallery, its artists, and upcoming shows, visit aobfineart.com.