Tag Archives: aging

Aging in the Office

October 13, 2016 by

The older workforce is continuously growing. By 2022, the number of workers over the age of 54 is projected to increase by nearly 40 percent, due largely to baby boomers working past typical retirement age. Older workers’ valuable experience contributes to their companies’ productivity. Yet, they experience natural age-related conditions that compromise peak performance. Paying attention to ergonomic principles in office furniture and work practices can improve and enhance older workers’ ability to effectively contribute.

An older workforce brings stability and institutional memory to a company. In fact, older workers often impart knowledge to new hires—which is a proven way new workers learn how to do their jobs. C-level employees often become mentors, developing younger talent. Older workers at all job levels tend to be more motivated, with lower rates of absenteeism.

The down side is there’s no denying age-related functional limitations. Fortunately, steps can be taken in everyday office tasks to prevent strain or injury. These include: understanding sound ergonomics and methods of human factors, along with teaching how to recognize the principles of universal design, regardless of age, or physical limitations.

Age affects the musculoskeletal system by reducing one’s strength. Muscles and tendons weaken. Similarly, bones become more porous, and cartilage can degenerate—both of which are considered a normal consequence of aging. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) often involve back, hand, shoulder, and arm pain.

While 62 percent of men and women between ages 51 and 61 report one or more MSDs, work-related MSDs are difficult to separate from those caused outside the office. Employers should be proactive in making sure tasks neither cause MSDs nor make them worse.

These Steps Will Assist Workers of All Ages:

Ergonomically designed seating with effective lumbar support is essential for an office chair. Armrests are doubly important for the older worker to support forearms during typing, and to help rising from the chair.

Encourage breaks. Short stretch breaks disrupt the repetitive arm/wrist/finger motions of keyboard and mouse usage. Standing to work is more available today, and should be done approximately 18 minutes every hour.

Other Age-Related Changes

Hearing loss occurs at a rate of 2–3.5 percent per year throughout life, meaning, a 50-year-old may miss what a 25-year-old hears clearly. Also, an older worker is less able to tune out background noise.

Vision changes begin to affect most people in their 40s or 50s. While the amount of light needed to see increases, the time it takes for eyes to adjust to changing levels also increases.

Addressing these limitations may require individually adjustable task lighting, reducing the pace of presentation in training situations, using larger type in instructional materials, and employing sound-masking techniques to dampen background noise. Though these changes are intended to help older workers, such steps are likely to benefit all workers.

Closing

Recognizing both sensory and musculoskeletal differences in older workers means adapting the workplace to offer them as much comfort and safety as possible. It also means encouraging ergonomically sound ways of working. These adjustments help younger workers as well, who will continue to benefit from them as their generations mature. B2B

Doug Schuring is the director of sales administration at All Makes Office Equipment Co.

Doug Schuring is the director of sales administration at All Makes Office Equipment Co.

Feeling Gravity’s Pull?

July 28, 2014 by

You may have already surmised that you are, in fact, getting older. Some of the indicators can be obvious: It takes you two or six tries to get up from the couch; parts of your body seem to be sloughing off like waterlogged loess. In broad terms: You’ve noticed that gravity has become your enemy.

But some signs can be quite subtle. So, to help things out, we’ve pieced together a profoundly serious checklist to help you gauge whether you are, in fact, just maybe, beginning to age a bit.

You know you’re 60 plus when…

  • You’ve actually driven to Hebron to see the World’s Largest Porch Swing.
  • “Happy Hour” is a nap.
  • You expect to see farm fields when you drive west of 72nd Street.
  • You wake up looking like your driver’s license picture.
  • Your address book has mostly names that start with “Dr.”
  • You remember when the College World Series was held somewhere other than Omaha.
  • And you enjoy saying things like, “I remember when the College World Series was held somewhere else.”
  • You send money to PBS after watching “Antiques Roadshow.”
  • You have a party and the neighbors don’t even realize it.
  • You still have a rotary dial, landline telephone.
  • You buy a compass for the dash of your car.
  • You still write letters to the editor of the local newspaper.
  • You remember who Zorinsky Lake is named after.
  • You turn out the lights for economic rather than romantic reasons.
  • You enjoy hearing about other people’s surgical operations.
  • You coached anyone who is now in a hall of fame.
  • You have a ticket stub from a concert at Peony Park.
  • You know what an IBM Selectric is.
  • Neighbors borrow your tools.
  • You miss the chicken at Rose Lodge, brunch at the Golden Apple, and hanging out at Tiner’s Drive-In on Dodge.
  • You consider a stroll through Memorial Park to be a day hike.
  • You’ve actually ridden on a real streetcar in Omaha.
  • People no longer view you as a hypochondriac.
  • You’re proud of your lawn mower.
  • You remember when Saturday afternoon shopping at Brandeis was a dress-up affair.

Dr. Mike Sitorius

April 25, 2013 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

As a family physician for 33 years, Dr. Mike Sitorius spends time stressing the importance of staying physically active to his patients. And while the doctor, 61, logs 60+ hours a week on the job, as well as serves a leadership role at UNMC, he still finds time to practice what he preaches. Some might say he “walks the walk.” Literally.

“I played a lot of basketball up until about my mid-50s when arthritis in my knees forced me to give it up,” Dr. Sitorius says. “Then I took up walking. I prefer to walk at work and try to get in 8,000 to 10,000 steps a day. I used to use a pedometer, but nowadays I have a pretty good gauge without one.”

That may seem like a lot of steps, but Dr. Sitorius says climbing the stairs whenever possible, taking “the long way” to meetings, and walking the six blocks between buildings on the UNMC campus several times daily allow him to rack up steps pretty quickly.

“It’s good physical activity, but it’s the mental part, too…Walking allows me good thinking time,” he adds. He also enjoys walking with his wife, Marilyn, a radiologist, in their Omaha neighborhood two or three times a week when the weather allows. “It’s a great time for us catch up on things with one another.”20130327_bs_9232_Web

Dr. Sitorius says he stretches and does balancing exercises regularly as well. “No tools or equipment needed…just my body.”

Mental exercise is as important as physical exercise, especially for the aging body, he declares. “Mental activity creates a sense of well-being and a better perception of one’s physical health. I encourage everyone to read—not just a novel but anything—or do something mentally stimulating…Learn something new. Right now, I’m trying to learn all of the new technology out there, one small bit at a time.”

One should not underestimate the importance of socializing to one’s health either, Dr. Sitorius says. “It’s easy to become disconnected to other groups, especially with all the technology today. Personal interaction is important. I love everything sports, and I always found time to socialize following my children’s high school and college sport teams (and with five children, that’s a lot of games!) and I’m a huge Husker fan—not just football but all [university] sports.”

He also stays connected, both personally and professionally, with his peers, serving on the Nebraska Advisory Commission for Rural Health and the Bellevue Medical Center Board.

Think balancing it all is tough with the doctor’s busy schedule? “My dad (who was a rural general practicioner) used to work 110-120 hours a week. He would have no sympathy for my schedule,” he says with a chuckle.

Quit Aging Yourself

March 25, 2013 by

Every year, we spend tons of money to keep our faces looking youthful and tight. But what we don’t realize is that some of our bad beauty habits are actually making us look older than we are. Here are some seemingly “no-brainer” tips that will help you keep your face looking young and beautiful without spending a fortune on anti-aging products:

Find the Right Foundation.

Every woman has been guilty of those embarrassing foundation lines at some point in her life. What you might not know is that the appearance of those lines is usually a signal that you’re not using the right kind or color of foundation. Even worse, using the wrong foundation can speed up the process of aging of your skin. The best way to prevent both of these problems is to find the best foundation for your skin.

Before you even think about brands, you need to determine what kind of foundation works best with your skin type. Have dry skin? Look for “moisturizing” or “hydrating” foundations. Have oily skin? Look for “oil-free” or “matte” foundations. Have a combination of oily and dry skin? Look for “cream-to-powder” foundations. Or if that seems like too much of a hassle, look for mineral foundations, which go great with any skin type—especially sensitive skin.

After determining the right kind of foundation, you need to match the color to your skin tone. Despite what you might have heard about testing the color on your wrist, the best place to test a foundation color is actually on your jawline, as this is the area where foundation is most noticeable (Remember those lines?). Make sure you’re as close to natural light as possible—like outside or near a window—while testing colors since indoor lighting can make you choose to dark of a color. Whichever color blends or disappears into your skin tone during the test is the color you should get.

Don’t Overpluck Your Brows.

Some women prefer professional eyebrow threading or waxing. But for those of us that prefer to save cash and time, plucking is the way to go. The only problem with plucking is that, too often, we overpluck our brows, giving us an aged look. Actually, the fuller the brow, the more youthful you look. Now, “fuller” doesn’t mean you let your eyebrows go ungroomed—just don’t pluck them too thin.

Before plucking, wash your face, brush your brows up and out with a brow brush (a clean toothbrush works, too), and sit near a window with a good mirror. To determine your brow thickness, use an eye pencil and draw a line along the bottom edge of your brow, following the fullest, natural shape. Any hairs that fall below this line are okay to pluck. The general rule with plucking is to make sure your brow begins in line with the inner corner of your eye and ends in line diagonally with the bottom edge of your nose and the outer corner of your eye. You can use a ruler (or your tweezers, if they’re long enough) to check if everything is aligned. Any hairs outside of these measurements can be removed.

If your brows are naturally too-thin, or if you’ve overplucked and are trying to grow your brows back out, use powder or an eyebrow pencil to fill in the shape. Just make sure to match the powder or eyebrow pencil shade to your natural hair color so you don’t age yourself any further—or look like a cartoon villain.

Remove Makeup and Wash Your Face.

It’s hard to get in the habit of removing our makeup and washing our faces every night when we’re tired and just want to get in bed. But not removing your makeup or washing your face is one of the quickest ways to age your skin. Just think about the fact that the average woman today begins wearing makeup at age 12 and wears makeup into her 70s and 80s. That’s long-term damage.

If you don’t use all-natural makeup, there are tons of harsh chemicals in your makeup that can damage your skin. Not to mention your skin is exposed to dirt, pollution, and germs throughout the day. Imagine all of those things collecting on your pillows as you sleep. If you think that’s gross, then why are you leaving those things on your face? At night, the skin needs oxygen to repair the damage done throughout the day. With your pores clogged, your skin can’t go through its natural exfoliation.

Also, our eyes start showing age the earliest because the skin around them is the thinnest. Going to bed with your makeup on dries the skin around your eyes out and weakens the hairs in your eyebrows and eyelashes, causing them to thin and fall out. Remember—it’s a lot easier to remove your makeup and wash your face than it is to undo aging and regrow your eyebrows and eyelashes.