Tag Archives: 60Plus In Omaha

September/October 2018 60Plus Opener

September 10, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Fall is my favorite time of the year. Temperatures are comfortable, and everything looks dazzling with the brilliant foliage of jewel-like green, yellow, orange, red, amber, and gold.

It’s a great time for guests to visit Nebraska.

This fall is also special for the Lemke family. My oldest grandson, William Lemke, and his fiancée, Susannah Kosty, are getting married. The wedding will be at the beautiful St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Church in downtown Omaha (with a reception at The Durham Museum) on Sept. 29.

I’m looking forward to the event, celebrating with family and friends, and welcoming Susannah into our family.

From the Omaha Magazine family to yours, we hope you enjoy the season. 


This article was printed in the September/October 2018 edition of 60Plus in Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Don Hilpipre

August 12, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Stella’s Bar & Grill is paradise for burger-lovers. So, it should come as no surprise that the Bellevue eatery’s most loyal regular has been eating at Stella’s for more than 60 years. 

It’s not just any burger joint. On one wall there is the Wall of Fame, covered with photos of the rare conquerors of Stella’s signature food challenge, “The Stellanator” (a 4.75-pound burger stacked with six patties, six eggs, 12 pieces of bacon, peanut butter, and a host of other toppings all pinned between buns with a skewer). And of course, there is also the Wall of Shame for those unable to complete the monstrous burger with a side of fries within 45 minutes.

Confronted with the burger joint’s legendary reputation, a newcomer could easily overlook another of the restaurant’s famous staples—an elderly gentleman perched on the same black barstool day after day. His name is Don Hilpipre, better known as Stella’s most loyal customer.

Often wearing a baseball cap with statements like “U.S. Navy Retired,” the 92-year-old Hilpipre returns to the restaurant like clockwork—usually around midday, then again in late afternoon. Stella’s place in his daily routine has remained unchanged for a decade. 

“I’ve been coming up here every day for about 10 years now,” Hilpipre says, beaming with pride. “But I first came here around 1953. I remember Stella [aka Estelle Francois Sullivan Tobler, the restaurant’s original owner] making her hamburgers. Really, just the old-timers can say that.” 

Hilpipre, a native of Minnesota, discovered his love for burgers and the city of Omaha after moving here in the mid-1950s. Before his move to “The Beef State,” Hilpipre proudly served six years in the U.S. Navy and then went looking for his next adventure. 

His search for adventure led to the state of Nebraska. He worked as a postman in South Omaha for 28 years and treated himself to an occasional burger during his lunch breaks. That’s how his bond with Stella’s was born. 

He became a twice-a-day regular 10 years ago, upon moving into Harmony Court Retirement Apartments in Bellevue. Since then, he’s rarely missed the chance to sip a cold beer, nibble on a burger, and keep employees company. 

“He comes in normally twice a day,” says Stella’s co-owner, Pam Francois (the great-great-niece of the original Stella). “In the afternoons, he orders two Budweisers, gets hugs from all the girls, and then gets handshakes from all the guys.” 

If for some reason the loyal customer doesn’t show up, Stella’s staff will call him or check with his assisted living facility to make sure everything is OK. 

Overall, Hilpipre estimates he has eaten just about everything on the menu. He enjoys the burgers, chicken strips, and even the chili, but acknowledges that he does have a regular order: one Stella Staple Burger, no bun. 

But he has never tried the Stellanator challenge. Hilpipre says he doesn’t want to lose, and he knows he can’t eat that much.

While he’s quick to admit he loves the food, that isn’t the only thing that keeps him coming back. 

“I love everything here, but especially the girls,” he says with a grin. “They like me and I like them. I’ve got to give every one of them a hug before I leave.” 

For Hilpipre and those associated with the restaurant, being at Stella’s is as much about the food as it is about the family atmosphere. Overall, Hilpipre is just as much a part of Stella’s as the grease on the grill. 

“He’s part of the family,” Francois says. “He’s a reminder that you have to sometimes slow down and be that special person in someone’s life.”  


Visit stellasbarandgrill.com for more information about the restaurant.

This article was printed in the July/August 2018 edition of 60Plus in Omaha. 

The Evolution of Omaha Farmers Market

August 1, 2018 by
Photography by provided by Vic Gutman & Associates

It’s 8:30 a.m. and shoppers are standing by the Ed Welchert Produce stall in Aksarben Village on any given Sunday in the summer. The Omaha Farmers Market won’t open for another 30 minutes, giving Donna and Ed Welchert (and their team of employees) precious minutes to finish setting up the stand. At 9 a.m., it’s time to sell. 

The Welcherts have been a staple of the Omaha Farmers Market since it began downtown 25 years ago. The locations and days of the week have changed—and the crowds have grown—as the market gradually evolved into a refined citywide network of markets with corporate sponsors.

Omaha Farmers Market began in 1994 with a small group of vendors in the Old Market. At the time, Ed Welchert had been farming land north of Omaha with his family for decades, selling his produce wholesale direct to stores like Foodway and Baker’s. When the Welcherts heard about the concept of an outdoor bazaar starting in the Old Market, they figured they ought to check it out. 

Not knowing what to expect, they sent one employee with a card table and a couple of wicker baskets full of produce. It fit in one pickup truck.

“It was a slow start,” remembers Donna, recalling how their employee brought almost all of the produce back to the farm that day.

“The people started coming, and kept coming, and kept coming,” Donna says. Her husband estimates it was a good 10 years before things really picked up, and when they did, it just jumped in attendance, he says. 

Kent Cisar, an Omaha native, started shopping at the Omaha Farmers Market around that time. 

“I loved the vibe of the market back then,” he recalls. “I think the early days of the market for me was shopping with friends who were committed to buying local, high-quality items.”

It wasn’t the first time farmers sold their goods in the Old Market. Agrarians originally sold fruits and vegetables wholesale to restaurants and grocery stores at the City Market. It was a bustling trade in the 1880s, but the growth of grocery store warehouses ended the market in 1964. Ed vaguely recalls traveling with his father, Ray Welchert, to the City Market. Ray was a vendor there, as was Ed’s grandfather. 

In time, the third generation of Welcherts saw their stand grow along with the Omaha Farmers Market. The Welcherts eventually needed to bring three trucks for equipment and produce. 

As Ed Welchert Produce brought more crops, the Omaha Farmers Market added more vendors and locations. The downtown farmers market has expanded to more than 90 booths. In 2010, the Omaha Farmers Market added a second location, Aksarben Village, on Sundays. The Sunday market now has more than 115 vendor booths. A third, smaller Omaha Farmers Market runs on Wednesdays in July and August at Charles Drew Health Center.

The old City Market (bottom right) predated the 25-year-old Omaha Farmers Market downtown.

Cisar has his favorite vendors. He first bought bacon from North Star Neighbors. When they stopped vending, he discovered Crooked Creek Farms. When they switched to selling only at Aksarben Village, Cisar sought them out there.

“The Aksarben Market is now the better market. There’s more vendors, a bit more space, and since it’s centrally located, on nice days it’s jammed, which I like,” Cisar says. “But if you want to get [specific] items, you better get there before 10 a.m., otherwise [they] may be gone. The Downtown Market isn’t as busy with patrons or vendors these days, but it’s still home. I love the Aksarben area and what it’s done for our city, but nothing can replicate the vibe of brick, old buildings and fresh food of the downtown market.”

Other local farmers markets not affiliated with the officially branded “Omaha Farmers Market” include the Florence Mill Farmers Market (on Sundays at the Florence Mill), the Benson Farmers Market (normally held on Saturdays, but discontinued in 2018 after the loss of the Benson market location), and the Village Pointe Farmers Market (Saturdays).

The Welcherts tried to sell at both the Old Market and Aksarben Village locations, but “it about killed us,” Donna says. After 21 years in the Old Market, the Welcherts switched to just Sundays in Aksarben.

The Welcherts typically sell green beans and potatoes. In recent years, they began diversifying their offerings as they noticed younger customers’ changing preferences.

“The younger crowd is more health conscious,” Ed says. 

Donna noticed the shift in customers, too. The first year they brought kohlrabi, she says just the older customers knew what to do with it. “Over the next two years, you saw this huge shift when younger people came and asked for it.”

Count Cisar among the crowd of novelty-seeking shoppers. 

“I think my favorite days of shopping at the market are when I go down with an open mind and let the items I see do the talking,” Cisar says. “I’m always attracted to things I haven’t seen before, like a unique eggplant, squash, or [other] vegetable, and I like asking the vendor how to use it, how it tastes—and, if I was successful, I tell them about it
next week.”  


Vic Gutman & Associates manages Omaha Farmers Market, which hosts vendors selling fresh produce at the Old Market (Saturdays), Aksarben Village (Sundays), and Charles Drew Health Center (Wednesdays) in the summer, in addition to other specialty markets throughout the year. Visit omahafarmersmarket.com for more information.

This article was printed in the July/August 2018 edition of 60Plus in Omaha.

Downtown’s old City Market

Ironman Chef Paul Braunschweiler

July 13, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Chef Paul Braunschweiler of Brushi started cooking when he was 6 years old, living in Switzerland with his family. 

Although Braunschweiler claims he wasn’t “sporty” growing up, he did enjoy participating in track up until he enrolled in culinary school and became too busy for extracurricular activities. Now an official Ironman with three completed Ironman triathlons under his belt and numerous other races to his credit, Braunschweiler admits that “being in tune” with his body’s dietary needs has helped his race performance. 

“Your body tells you what it needs,” he says. “You have to listen to your body.” He doesn’t follow a strict protocol when it comes to his day-to-day eating, nor does he switch things up pre- or post-race. What he eats largely depends on what he feels like eating. Luckily for Braunschweiler, he has the well-stocked kitchen at Brushi at his disposal. “I can eat what I want. I can just walk around and open the fridge,” he says, gesturing toward the busy Brushi kitchen. 

Though many racers swear by “carb-loading” right before a race, Braunschweiler sticks with what his body craves. “I eat what I want; I don’t change my diet at race time a lot.” When asked what a typical day-before-a-race meal might look like for him, he replies, “We get fresh fish from Hawaii every week, so that’s what I’d eat. I eat a lot of salmon.” As for his pre-race nourishment, “I don’t eat a lot before a race—maybe a sports drink and a banana.” Post-race, his go-to meal is “a big bowl of salad with lots of marinated salmon and cucumbers and avocados.” He says his body does crave protein after a race, so if he doesn’t feel like salmon he might have some beef or other meat protein. 

Does eating whatever he wants work for Braunschweiler as an athlete? Yes—although his penchant for fresh, nutrient-rich food likely helps. Giving in to cravings won’t work for all racers. But it works for Braunschweiler because he enjoys healthy foods and occasionally allows for splurges so he doesn’t feel deprived. “Allow yourself to splurge a little bit,” he advises fellow racers. “We can do this because we are so active.”

He wasn’t always so active. It wasn’t until after his divorce that he delved into the racing world. “I needed to do something for myself after my divorce,” he says. “I saw people rollerblading and running at Lake Zorinsky, and I decided to start running again. I signed up for the Des Moines Marathon and liked it—I did pretty well even though it’s a little hilly.”

Braunschweiler has progressed from “doing pretty well” to consistently winning in his age division at every race in which he competes. At nearly 67 years old, he’s diversified his racing because “marathons are hard on the body.” Triathlons are his race of choice nowadays. His advice to other racers is, “You have to make time to train. You can achieve so much with your will.”  


Visit raceomaha.com for more information about the Omaha Triathlon. Visit brushiomaha.com for chef Paul Braunschweiler’s restaurant in Omaha.

This article was printed in the July/August 2018 edition of 60Plus in Omaha. 

Aprons Through the Ages

July 4, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

According to the King James Version of the Bible, the use of aprons dates back to Adam and Eve:

“And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves aprons,” Genesis 3:7.

That original apron made of fig leaves may be the only apron that isn’t represented in Donna Shonkwiler’s vintage collection. 

“I started collecting aprons because they take me back to my childhood days, when my mother and sisters and I wore them to do our chores together,” Shonkwiler recalls.

The apron collector lives in the Florence area but grew up in rural Brazil. Her missionary parents were poor (they had to clear the land to build their house, which had no indoor plumbing or electricity). Nevertheless, she has fond memories of those days. “It was a happy time for me, when life was simple,” Shonkwiler says 

Shonkwiler’s vast collection of aprons—most of which are carefully ironed and hanging on clothes racks—represents various time periods, locations, ethnic groups, and purposes. Included are aprons with names of states and countries. Some are indicative of particular cultures. Others are made for specific purposes. 

She has sturdy cotton aprons with pockets for crafts or gardening, as well as delicate and frilly aprons worn by the lady of the house for special occasions. Many of her aprons have elaborate embroidery, crochet, rickrack, lace, appliqué, and/or cross-stitching. Some have ladies’ hankies sewn onto them. 

“Aprons were a form of art that reflected a woman’s talent,” she explains, “each limited only by her imagination.” 

According to Shonkwiler, aprons had many uses beyond protecting clothes while cooking. “We used aprons to collect eggs from the chicken coops and vegetables from the garden,” she says, “in addition to drying a child’s tears and wiping a perspiring brow.” Also, some were made with extra padding at the edges so they could double as hot pads. “Most grandmas and moms were seamstresses out of necessity, and passed down their talents to their children at an early age.” 

Although primarily consisting of women’s aprons, her collection does include some
barbecue aprons for men. 

Shonkwiler’s 35 years of collecting has resulted in “probably” 400 aprons, mostly all handmade, and amazingly, no two alike. She has cultivated the collection through flea markets, garage sales, and thrift stores. A few of them date to the early 1900s. 

Her favorite apron holds special meaning, as it was made by her mother. The eyelet full apron (meaning it includes a front bib) was sewn especially for Shonkwiler.

Shonkwiler’s unique collection has never been on display…until now. An exhibit of her aprons kicked off the annual Florence Days celebration on May 12. Family Ties: Art of the Apron will remain on display (with some of the aprons available for sale) at the Florence Mill ArtLoft through July 15. The eyelet apron, a cherished memento normally tucked safely away in a cedar chest, is part of the display.

After a 47-year career as a respiratory therapist, Shonkwiler is enjoying her retirement. “I’ve loved collecting aprons all these years,” she says. “Now it’s time to share my collection with others, so they can enjoy them, too.”


Visit the Florence Mill on Facebook at @theflorencemill for more information.

This article was printed in the July/August 2018 edition of 60Plus in Omaha. 

60Plus Opener

June 20, 2018 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Since this is our food issue, I wanted to share a recipe that has been passed down through
generations of my family.

I remember Grandmother Johnson (my mother’s mother) coming for long summer and Christmastime visits. Her parents, Grandfather Johnson, and his parents were all born in Sweden. But Grandmother Johnson was born in Clay County, Nebraska.

She was an exceptional seamstress. Grandmother Johnson would sew beautiful dresses for my two sisters and me. It was from her that I learned to love fashion and style. She was also a great cook. Although she had some recipes I wasn’t fond of—such as lutefisk (made from aged stockfish or dried/salted whitefish soaked in lye)—she always made Swedish pancakes for breakfast during her visits. They were easy to prepare, and she taught us how to make them as children.

Swedish pancakes

Ingredients:
4 eggs
1 tablespoon sugar
2 cups milk
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup flour
1 pinch salt                   

Instructions:
1. Preheat skillet to medium heat.
2. In a large bowl, beat eggs with wire whisk.
3. Mix in milk, flour, sugar, salt, and melted butter.
4. Pour thin layer on skillet and spread to edges.
5. Cook until top appears dry.
6. Cut into two or four sections and flip with spatula.
7. Cook for another two minutes (or until golden brown).
8. Roll up each pancake and serve with fresh fruit or butter and syrup.

At Christmas, she made pretty and delicious decorated sugar cookies, gingerbread men, snowballs (a Swedish heirloom cookie), Swedish meatballs, and lutefisk. But pancakes are the sort of dish that goes well with any breakfast occasion.

Maybe I’ll make some pancakes for the Fourth of July. Happy Independence Day! 


Gwen Lemke, Contributing Editor for 60Plus In Omaha

Joan Standifer

December 22, 2017 by
Photography by Heather and Jameson Hooton

These autobiographical pieces and corresponding photos are part of a special edition of 60PLUS featuring local residents who prove that fashion has no age limits.


Joan Standifer, 75

I’m a fabulous, 75-year-young woman with an attitude that embraces the joy of living.

I’m an Omaha native who raised two now-adult children: Michael, who lives in Omaha, and Monica Baker, who lives in Atlanta, Georgia. My legacy continues with granddaughter, Micka, and 8-month-old great-granddaughter, Zaina. I am married to the marvelous love of my life, Stanley Standifer, and enjoy a blended family with his four children and seven grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

My college education culminated with a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska-Omaha in education administration. Over a 30-year span, I held several positions with Omaha Public Schools, retiring as an elementary principal.

Many years of my life were spent as an advocate of social equality and quality education. I consider myself a cultural navigator, dedicated to lifelong learning and discovery of the world and its people. This philosophy has been reinforced by my travels to 75 percent of the world, and in serving on civic, social, and education boards. As a UNO-sponsored Fulbright Scholarship recipient, I traveled to Pakistan, met world leaders, and shared these experiences in presentations. Many honors and awards have been extended to me as a result of sharing my experiences.

Happiness is knowing that my life has been a beacon for my former students and members of my family. It’s rewarding to know that a former fifth-grade student of mine, to this day, regards me as the “greatest teacher ever.” I relish the fact that at this age, I continue to make a difference in the lives of those around me.

Let your light shine so that others can walk in your path toward success in life. Let others discover their value and be willing to share of themselves for the greater good. Be honest and unpretentious in your relationships. Aging becomes less of a factor when you live by faith and have respect for mankind.

This article was printed in the January/February 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Tony Abbott, Ron Palagi, and Frank Skrupa

Photography by Heather and Jameson Hooton

These autobiographical pieces and corresponding photos are part of a special edition of 60PLUS featuring local residents who prove that fashion has no age limits.


Tony Abbott, 75

I was born during World War II. My father was away in the Army, and my mother went to live with her parents in Hordville, Nebraska. So, in the beginning, I was a country boy. We later moved back to South Omaha where I began grade school. In the early ’50s, we moved to a house in the Blackstone area. I finished high school at Omaha Central and began studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha.

I found work at an aquarium store called the Fin Shop on South 14th Street. While there, I met Michael Harrison. We would work together for 30 years. He passed away in 1992.

In 1969, we began work at the French Café in the Old Market. Slowly the Old Market began to grow, and so did the French Café. I’m very proud and happy to have survived 42 years in the restaurant business. During that time, the name French Café was recognized in Omaha by residents and praised by the press locally, nationally, and internationally. I was also named “Maître-Conseil en Gastronomie Française” by the French government and presented with a medal.

I married late in life and was delighted to receive two beautiful girls. Sadly, I lost one of them to cardiac arrest due to asthma.

Happiness is having wonderful friends like Ron Palagi and Frank Skrupa (among others).

I was told many years ago, “You are born to die, so make the most of the life you are given and enjoy.”


Ronald Palagi, forever young

As a young boy, it was my dream to be an attorney who helped others. Yes, I’m living my dream.

I find happiness in cooking for and with loved ones and friends, and in great music and art.

I was blessed with loving parents, wonderful independent daughters, creative friends, and loves in many countries.

Laugh, cry, give thanks, and keep moving every day. Life is a mystery. Each day is an adventure.


Frank Skrupa, 85

I was born, raised, and entirely educated in Omaha. I married the right woman, who was delightful, humorous, and hard working. I worked with Rosemary for 40 years in business, and I’m proud Credit Advisors is still around after 60 years.

I have only lived in two houses in my life: my parents’ home, and the one I moved into when I married and raised a family. I still live there now.

I am proud of the friends who helped me along the way, and my three children, Frank, Sam, and Carlo. As Rosemary, an attorney herself, would say, “Two are attorneys, and one is a success.”

What makes me happiest? BS-ing with friends over good wine and food, my children, and (in a pinch) reasonable relatives.

Humor is the secret to a good life. Also, cut back to just one bottle of wine a day. Exercise is for dogs and horses. I tried golf once but gave it up when I realized the better you get, the less you get to hit the ball.

This article was printed in the January/February 2018 edition of Omaha Magazine.

Prime Time

Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Here is proof that 60 years old is the new 40, and 80 is the new 60.

In this edition of 60PLUS, you will see the portraits of 15 stylish and beautiful individuals. Some of their personal fashion sensibilities could be described as flamboyant. Other styles are more classic. But none of the looks featured here could be characterized as “old.”

All of these models are older than age 60. All of the pictured individuals live active lifestyles. Each makes a significant contribution to our local society.

Along with their portraits, each has shared a bit about their lives: who they are, what they enjoy, what makes them happy, and any advice they might have. Their personal anecdotes are interesting, and the advice can be quite humorous at times.

It has been so much fun working with these vibrant people, renewing friendships, and getting acquainted with new friends. Keeping with the spirit of this special edition of 60PLUS, I want to share a bit about myself, too.

I married young. My husband, Raymond, and I raised four wonderful sons, whom I’m very proud of. We have nine grandchildren that I enjoy as young adults.

I owned a real estate company for 30 years and was active in the real estate community. I am a past president of the Omaha Area Board of Realtors. I’m proud to have been the first woman broker member of the Nebraska Real Estate Commission.

After a very brief retirement, I started working for Omaha Magazine. I thoroughly enjoy it, and I still work full time, five days a week.

I love to entertain and have had a lot of themed parties, such as a Shakespeare party; Japanese party with members of the Japanese American Club entertaining us; German party with zither and accordion players; and a ’50s party with Elvis and Marilyn Monroe. Guests always dressed for the occasion. One of my holiday parties featured fortunetellers.

I have known many of my friends for years, and I have enjoyed sharing wine with them. I have also been fortunate to travel the world (I’ve been to more than 30 countries).

My family and friends bring me happiness. Conversation, humor, and music bring me pleasure. I love music—it brings memories of the past and, yes, dreams for the future.

My style of dress might be considered classic and sometimes a little dramatic. I enjoy dressing up. It is a compliment to the people you are with and conveys respect for those around you.

I hope you enjoy the following style portraits and words of wisdom from good-looking Omaha society influencers who are thriving in their “prime time.”

Influencers included here:

This article was printed in the January/February 2018 issue of Omaha Magazine.

Roger duRand

December 21, 2017 by
Photography by Heather and Jameson Hooton

These autobiographical pieces and corresponding photos are part of a special edition of 60PLUS featuring local residents who prove that fashion has no age limits.

Roger duRand, 74

I’m a designer, husband, father, and grandfather (and former “fashion guru,” according to the World-Herald).

Although I was born in Colorado, I grew up in Omaha. After I finished school, I traveled extensively in the U.S., performing a variety of jobs from folk singer and fry cook to portrait artist, art teacher, sign-painter, and illustrator, all the while passing through Omaha occasionally to work with my father as an architectural designer (as I had done from the age of 13).

I eventually gravitated back to Omaha, and became a partner in 1967 in a Midtown counter-cultural shop called The Farthest Outpost. When I learned of the former produce market downtown and toured the beautiful old buildings, I knew I wanted to be there. The Farthest Outpost became one of the first new businesses that opened in the Old Market in 1968. We sold the business in 1969 and opened duRand & Wright, a design-oriented shop, which I closed a year later to concentrate on my own design practice. I designed many shops, apartments, condos, logos, and advertising campaigns, and provided aesthetic counsel to nascent businesses in the growing Old Market.

Over the years, I have designed for clients across the country and in England, but the Old Market holds a special place in my affections.

In 1971, I participated in the planning commission that created the “return to the river” Central Park Mall, and the anticipated Marina City that was tragically co-opted by ConAgra. I fought to save Jobbers Canyon from
needless demolition.

In the ’80s, I served on Omaha’s Zoning Board of Appeals, and later on the Landmarks Historic Preservation Commission.

My work consists of a variety of disciplines: primary architecture, interior architecture, furniture design, lighting design, graphic design, and corporate identity.

Back in the day, I used to cut hair for rock bands. The Farthest Outpost booked San Francisco bands into the Music Box and other local venues. I even made clothes and leather goods.

My wife, Jody, and I were married 24 years ago in the Garden of the Zodiac and hosted our reception at La Buvette, closing 11th Street south of Howard Street for the party.

Life is good. I will never retire. Family, work, recreation, and travel energize me.

My advice on aging is: don’t. Stay involved in society. Stay fit and healthy. Use your special abilities. Show your love and friendship.

There’s no reason that a person of advancing years can’t look great. Style trumps fashion. Style is art; fashion is commerce. Have the confidence to express your unique personal creativity in dress. I have acquired a great wardrobe over many years, and routinely wear items that are 40 years old. Buy the best quality and maintain conscientiously. Style is never out of style.

This article first appeared in the January/February 2018 edition of 60PLUS.