November 24, 2017 by
Photography by Bill Si

When Omaha transplant and burgeoning singer/rapper Ria Gold first heard Aaliyah’s posthumous album, 2002’s I Care 4 U, she was hooked. The Toledo, Ohio, native was so entranced by it, she played it start-to-finish countless times. The late R&B/pop sensation was the first artist Gold felt truly connected to; however, her musical tastes go way deeper. Gold is moved more by rhythm than anything else.

“Everyone around me listened to alternative music,” Gold explains. “That led me to listening to rock, R&B, anything alternative, and everything in between. I also have a very eclectic soul, so a tune that catches my soul is a good tune to me.”

From Destiny’s Child and Avril Lavigne to Alicia Keys and Paramore, Gold has drawn from a variety of diverse influences for as long as she can remember. Around age 13, Gold realized she wanted to pursue music, but she started off slowly.

“I started taking songwriting more serious at the age of 9,” she says. “But I wasn’t thinking about any certain path at that age.”

In 2010, Gold finally performed live for the first time at Sokol Auditorium, an event she’ll never forget. At the time, she was only 15 years old.

“Oh my gosh,” she says with a sense of awe. “Luckily, I performed a song I had written with a friend. He helped me feel comfortable on stage for the first time. I was just as excited as I was nervous, but I looked cute and I didn’t mess up, so that was good.”

Fast-forward to 2017 and Gold, now 23, has graced multiple stages. In 2016, she won her first battle rap tournament at Soho Lounge and is currently preparing to enter her second one at Club Vibe.

She just wrapped up an inaugural performance at Femme Fest, and is working on her aptly titled EP trilogy — Moodring Pt. 1, Moodring Pt. 2 and Moodring Pt. 3. The project, which she plans to release in 2018, is a glimpse into her sometimes tumultuous love life.

“I’m really excited to share it because it displays all the emotions I’ve gone through dealing with my last breakup and going into my current relationship,” she explains. “It’ll take you through some ups and downs for sure, and that’s why I chose the title Moodring.”

Fans of Gold have described her vocal style as a mix between singing and rapping, or what she describes as “something like a melodic poet.”

“That’s why I feel so naturally connected to both,” she says.

When she’s not working on music, Gold stays busy working at her friend Imagine Uhlenbrock’s shop in North Omaha, Hand of Gold Beauty Room, where she primarily works as a freelance makeup artist.

“I was there to assist in doing the simpler, less intricate designs such as solid color manicures and pedicures, and chrome,” she says. “Now, I go in every once in a while to help keep the maintenance of the store up. I may take a client or two, depending on how creative I’m feeling that day.”

Considering it’s not full-time work, it’s a job that seems to fit in with her musical endeavors and constantly fluctuating schedule. It also helps keep her connected to the seemingly endless creative minds in the Omaha scene.

“I think Omaha has a great music community,” she says. “There is a crazy amount of talent here in all genres, and the collaborations that are formed from the artists in our city never cease to amaze me. We’ve got some hidden gems and some culture behind us.”

As Gold continues cultivating her own talent, she’s settled on a few pre-show rituals. Before getting ready for a performance, Gold does a little “pre-gaming,” which usually involves some liquor and lots of practice. She normally begins every show with the line, “Hey everyone, I’m a little faded.”

“I usually have a few shots before I go on stage,” she admits. “For the most part, I will get my set together a few hours before a show. I like to choose the music I’m performing based off of my most current mood. I still rehearse my own music when getting ready for a show. I never want to forget lines or blank in front of a crowd, so rehearsal is key.”

From solo tracks like “Really Wanna” to her collaborative work on “Good Good” with fellow musician Justin Carlisle, Gold oozes an air of confidence and a touch of sensuality. It’s allowed her to stand out among the vast sea of aspiring artists, especially online, where it’s easy to get lost in the sheer number of musicians.

“The internet is the constant positive for up and coming artists,” she says. “It gives us a way to broadcast our talents with no boundaries or regulations. It’s raw and easily accessible for the world to see. Anyone can break through or ‘shine’ in a crowd of artists, as long as they are being unique, authentic, and true to their craft.”

Listen to Ria Gold’s music on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/1goldieworld

This article was printed in the November/December 2017 edition of Encounter.