August 26, 2016 by
Photography by Bill Sitzmann

Drew and Mandy Embury had already fully experienced the advantages of traditional homeownership as well as its not-so-good points—like the four-season property upkeep and the inconvenience of two major remodels—so when it came time to find a new residence a few years ago, they were ready to go in a different direction, both literally (as in east) and figuratively (as in new lifestyle).

“We were kind of unique where we were empty nesters at 38-years-old when our daughter graduated high school and went off to college,” Drew explains. “We wanted to live that downtown lifestyle, to get rid of snow removal and taking care of a lawn, and everything that comes with owning a home.”

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“We were done with that,” Mandy agrees.

The couple found a move-in ready, two-bedroom condo in the 1000 Dodge Building located at 10th and Dodge streets in the emerging Capitol District. The $6 million Shamrock Development project renovated a circa 1928 food warehouse into 12 residences and several commercial spaces in 2004. The basement level provided space for conversion into underground parking, and a third floor was added to the two-story building . Most of the exterior features were preserved, and the structure is instantly recognizable in historic photos.

“Although we’re in an old building, we’re on a new floor, which has some advantages,” Drew says of the couple’s third-floor unit. “And one of the things we liked about the unit was that we didn’t have to remodel.”

Emburys4The couple were not the original tenants, but they embraced the condo’s open, 2,000-square-foot floor plan that features wood floors, 11-foot wooden plank ceilings, a walkout balcony, and a gourmet kitchen. They have enjoyed using building amenities, such as an exercise room and rooftop deck. What really sold the Emburys, they say, was the location.

“We’re kind of equidistant between the CenturyLink Center and the NoDo area,” Drew says. The Slowdown—a favorite music venue for the couple—is just blocks away. TD Ameritrade Park, the Old Market, and an array of other attractions are within reasonable walking distance year-round, he adds.

“It’s all right there…you don’t have to even plan your day, there’s always something going on,” Drew says.

The Emburys also enjoy the fact that the Capitol District is not right in the thick of some activities. Drew says, “It has proved to be a very good location; it’s probably a little quieter at night, especially on the weekends. We don’t get the exuberant bar crowds that get out at 2 a.m.”

Now that they have a few years of downtown living behind them, the Emburys say the low-maintenance lifestyle they envisioned has lived up well to their expectations.

“I just enjoy that I’m not living to care for my home. I was at the point, when we were still in our house, that taking care of the yard took so much out of the week. I love that I don’t have to think about it,” Mandy says. “And now we just watch the city plows drive by and clear the snow. I don’t have to do it.”

“Now we just sit there and smile,” Drew adds.

The Emburys also have another front-row perspective: they are literally witnessing the district develop from a view that overlooks Dodge Street.

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“I’d like to see a few more restaurants in the area, in the Capitol District,” Drew says. Mandy, who likes to cook, is admittedly impatient for a major grocery store. Drew still commutes west during the work week (he’s a founding partner of P&L Technology Inc., a technology services company recently acquired by Harland Technology Services), but he says he looks forward to a future where he and his neighbors—as well as downtown visitors—have even more employment, entertainment, residential, and transportation options.

“Having a vibrant cosmopolitan city center is important, even for people who don’t want to live that lifestyle,” he says. “They can come down and enjoy those things that it has to offer.”

Drew, a member of the board of directors for the Omaha Downtown Improvement District Association, also sees the ongoing development of his and surrounding neighborhoods as an important part of a bigger picture.

“That type of development is critical to connecting NoDo to the Old Market—NoDo, Capitol, Old Market—then the Riverfront will be the next area that they’ll really try to redevelop and get connected. The development in the Capitol District, specifically, will play a big part in connecting those areas of the city…The more that happens, I’m hoping the more interesting the neighborhood will be. It’s cool to be down here and be a tiny part of that big project.”

Visit capitoldistrictomaha.com for more information. Encounter

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